GeorgeBMac

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GeorgeBMac
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  • Apple has made it clear how you should wear your Apple Watch

    Why would I have to turn off my water proof watch to clean it with water?   No, I won't put it under pressure washer, but it should be able to withstand a splash of water.
    cy_starkman
  • Editorial: Apple's American-made Mac Pro isn't an exit from China

    knowitall said:
    rob53 said:
    "It was the lack of any modern manufacturing culture, including the schools and apprenticeships needed to train specialized mechanical engineers. " I continue to say that this is the biggest problem and liability corporate American and the United States in general has. Because too much emphasis is placed on generalized testing, pushing students to worthless degrees like MBAs and JDs, and not enough emphasis is placed on teaching students starting in kindergarten how to use their hands and brains to build things is what's causing the USA to fall behind other countries in manufacturing. Americans are lazy and want an easy desk job without getting their hands dirty. Schools need to bring back the arts as well as vocational education. There's nothing wrong with being a plumber, contractor or laborer, except in the minds of lazy people who were never taught how to use a hammer, saw or even a paint roller. I can't see someone wanting to become an engineer is they've never been given the chance to play with toys they've made instead of simply watching TV or exercising their thumbs on their phones. Parents needs to introduce their kids to building things instead of simply buying prebuilt toys. I started out building my toys, learned how to work on a car, basically taught myself electronics and computerized systems (I'm older so we didn't have the classes kids have now) and was taught woodworking by my grandfather, which I really enjoy. 

    Before everyone blames Apple for going to China to have things built, look in the mirror and ask yourself whether you have the ability or desire to do it. For many on this forum the answer will be yes but ask your family and friends the same question and I bet the answers will overwhelmingly be NO.


    DED: what happened to your https://roughlydraftedbeta.com website? Is it in production?
    I agree completely.
    Only, I think the real question is can it currently be done in the USA and in a competitive way.
    And the answer is yes, as Musks Tesla mega factories demonstrate.  
    When you don't try the answer is always no.
    Skill sets can rapidly be generated, for example by hands-on training at the workplace and special learn/work classes.
    In general industry complains about the level and type of education and the answer is do it (educate) yourself. 
    With great result as is shown in Teslas case.
    How do you think China got is ‘skilled workforce’, this is a military style operation, factory's select the people actually already being able to do the tasks at hand. This is possible because they can choose from millions of people. So no education is involved at all ...

    That is quite obviously true. 
    But still, obstacles remain.   One is the 'tomato syndrome' (nobody wants to pick tomatoes).   Another is education (we graduated generations of workers from our schools who could barely read).  Another is corporate greed (where they do not want to divert money from their bonuses and buybacks to invest in their own workers), and another is the industrial infrastructure (the steel mills didn't stand by themselves, they had a network of satellite support operations).   Another is the health of the workforce (too many are fat and sick from pizza, beer and BigMacs).  Another is the switch to managed corporations owned by disinterested owners (Part of the cause of the Great Recession was investment banks had switched from partner owners running the business to remote stock holders putting their faith in managers who were mostly interested in their quarterly bonuses rather than growing the business).

    Yes, it CAN be done.
    But Tesla may not be the best example:  their ultra high selling prices can hide a lot of inefficiencies.   And, even if all cars were made here that way, to be able to afford the cars they make the factories would need to be paying exorbitant salaries.

    We have never really come to grips with WHY basic American industry died.   Essentially, Japan came in with better, newer factories, better management and better workers and not even protective tariffs could protect American industry from the competition.  Our answer to the superior competition was globalization (NAFTA, etc.) and competing with those things that we did best.   Globalization wasn't the cause of the demise of American industry, it was the response.    Instead of taking a good, hard look at ourselves and what we did wrong (and there were many things on all sides) we try to blame 'the other' (management blames the worker, the worker blames management and everybody blames the government) -- while continuing to believe we are the mightiest in the world.   I think like any addict we will need to hit rock bottom before seeking to pull ourselves up to once again reach our full potential.

    Added:  When was the last time you heard of a major Chinese corporation being shut down with a strike -- and having to pay out billions in pension costs?   And, even the settlement continues to shut down U.S. plants -- and then replace thousands of highly paid workers with hundreds of minimum wage (well, $15/hr) workers.   It's a sign that the U.S. is simply adjusting to the fact that it cannot have its cake and eat it to.
    knowitall
  • Editorial: Apple's American-made Mac Pro isn't an exit from China

    Despite all the Trumpian hoopla, American industry remains dead and has no realistic prospect of arising from its grave.   Successful industry requires investment:
    --  Instead of investing in the infrastructure required by industry our government is mostly concerned about cutting taxes and spending.  The last real infrastructure was the interstate system from 50-60 years ago -- which, ironically ended up taking down our vital railroad system.
    --  American businesses are more focused on providing share buybacks and dividends than investing in, growing and developing the business.
    --  The American public education system fell behind that of Asia long ago.   And, higher education has become a business focused on profit more than education.  The result is that American workers have been divided into 2 classes:   One is mostly unskilled and the other over-educated in things that don't help produce anything.

    Basically:
    -- Government stopped investing in the country
    --  Businesses stopped investing in themselves
    -- The work force is ineffective but overpaid.

    Until America ends its false pride and bravado and addresses its core problems, Apple is right in using the system that can do the job.
    bakedbananasFileMakerFeller
  • Editorial: Apple's American-made Mac Pro isn't an exit from China

    rob53 said:
    "It was the lack of any modern manufacturing culture, including the schools and apprenticeships needed to train specialized mechanical engineers. " I continue to say that this is the biggest problem and liability corporate American and the United States in general has. Because too much emphasis is placed on generalized testing, pushing students to worthless degrees like MBAs and JDs, and not enough emphasis is placed on teaching students starting in kindergarten how to use their hands and brains to build things is what's causing the USA to fall behind other countries in manufacturing. Americans are lazy and want an easy desk job without getting their hands dirty. Schools need to bring back the arts as well as vocational education. There's nothing wrong with being a plumber, contractor or laborer, except in the minds of lazy people who were never taught how to use a hammer, saw or even a paint roller. I can't see someone wanting to become an engineer is they've never been given the chance to play with toys they've made instead of simply watching TV or exercising their thumbs on their phones. Parents needs to introduce their kids to building things instead of simply buying prebuilt toys. I started out building my toys, learned how to work on a car, basically taught myself electronics and computerized systems (I'm older so we didn't have the classes kids have now) and was taught woodworking by my grandfather, which I really enjoy. 

    Before everyone blames Apple for going to China to have things built, look in the mirror and ask yourself whether you have the ability or desire to do it. For many on this forum the answer will be yes but ask your family and friends the same question and I bet the answers will overwhelmingly be NO.


    DED: what happened to your 
    https://roughlydraftedbeta.com website? Is it in production?
    A big part of the trouble is that the apprenticeships that built trained, experienced, professional level skilled workers have been replaced with trade schools pumping out unskilled or semi-skilled workers with a certificate.   Those semi-skilled workers end up getting hired by an MBA who knows about running the the finances of the business, but not the business of the business.

    Being a plumber for instance means knowing more than which end of a wrench to hold -- and it also involves knowing how and being willing to use a shovel.
    bakedbananas
  • AMC launches new video on demand platform to take on iTunes

    For myself, I have no desire to buy any movie online.   I'll rent them, but not buy them.
    The only reason for me to buy is if I want to watch it multiple times -- and I watch some (including concerts) that are 30 years old (and yes, I still have a VHS player hooked up!).   So, I don't want to have to depend on somebody else's cloud service to hold my movies -- and even storing them on home servers incurs its own issues and problems.

    No, I'll stick with DVDs (and/or VHS and BluRay) for the movies I want to buy.  It's cheap.  It works and its simple.
    davgreg