nht

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nht
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  • Should you upgrade to iPhone 11 Pro if you have an iPhone XS?

    dougd said:
    I have the 7+ and still have no plans to upgrade even though I could get the 11 for 499 with trade in.
    If it aint broke don't fix it.  Besides I like the home button.  Camera?? I have a Nikon D850 no comparison.
    You have your d850 with you every day?  Yes, there is no comparison between 0 pictures and many pictures of decent enough quality.
    watto_cobra
  • Compared: 2019 iPad 7th generation vs iPad Pro vs iPad Air & mini

    I've never understood why the differences in the A series chips is always downplayed with "you won't notice unless they're side by side" etc. when differences in Intel chips in laptops is rarely treated that way. Laptop chips always have the how-many-months-since-the-last-refresh attached to them like it's vitally important to get a next generation chip to run the exact same legacy software people have been running for years and years.
    It's incumbent upon the reader to separate the wheat info from the chaff marketing.    AI's axiom about not noticing without a direct comparison is true and can be applied to almost anything.  What you're describing with laptop chips happens with pretty much every product that has a yearly release cycle... including iPhones with A series chips.  Apple was just touting the %-age improvements of the A13 over the A12.  There's no mystery surrounding why the companies do it.  They want to sell their newest products.  Nothing wrong with that.

    A review or comparison is typically where you'll see the "you won't notice unless..." and it's entirely appropriate for it to be included there.  By and large, it's mostly true.  If I tell you my new app opens 15% faster than my old app it's not going to mean anything without proper context.  My old app opens in 0.5 sec.  So that would mean my new app opens in 0.425 sec.  Without a side by side comparison there'd be no way for you to gauge 15% faster.  More importantly, laptop reviews typically include benchmarks that show the side by side comparions so the argument really doesn't hold up.  
    specs matter now if you are a gamer or want to use multiple apps at a time.  The other spec not discussed is RAM.

    specs matter later when ios15 is slow on an A10 with 2GB RAM and ios16 is not supported for these iPads but are for the ones that have 3GB ram and an a12.

    The mini is likely far more future proof than the iPad.
    GeorgeBMacmontrosemacsmuthuk_vanalingamcgWerkswatto_cobra
  • Review: The BenQ PD3220U 4K HDR Thunderbolt 3 display is a good option for designers

    sirozha said:
    nht said:
    smack416 said:
    The trouble with basically any other monitor other than the 27" LG Ultrafine is the PPI. This BenQ is not retina resolution, nor is it well suited to MacOS as a non-retina display (reference: https://bjango.com/articles/macexternaldisplays/).

    With the 27" Ultrafine, you're sacrificing a few inches of screen largeness for a noticeable amount of clarity (218PPI vs 138PPI on the BenQ), many more pixels (5120 x 2880 vs 3840 x 2160 on the BenQ), and the LG costs you just $100 more. To me, there's no contest given the value, unless extreme response time is a deal breaker for you.

    The knock on the LG monitors is that they are not great in build quality, but the screens are as good as it gets. Simply put: the 27" LG Ultrafine monitor is the only option available today if you're looking for the clarity of a retina screen, and will be the only economical option when Apple releases their pro display. At least until a competitor else releases a +200 PPI monitor. In the meantime, this BenQ monitor doesn't compare.
    Enjoy your 27" 218 ppi display running a 2650x1440 desktop because running native 5120 x 2880 makes everything too small.  That why I have a 43" 4K monitor running 3200x1800.
    Only fonts and other screen elements are double pixeled. Any graphics editing software displays images in the pixel-for-pixel manner; hence, they are displayed in the 5k resolution even if you double pixel in macOS.
    Which doesn’t matter if you have to zoom in on the image to actually edit it because it’s otherwise too small.
    williamlondon
  • Review: The BenQ PD3220U 4K HDR Thunderbolt 3 display is a good option for designers

    nht said:
    smack416 said:
    The trouble with basically any other monitor other than the 27" LG Ultrafine is the PPI. This BenQ is not retina resolution, nor is it well suited to MacOS as a non-retina display (reference: https://bjango.com/articles/macexternaldisplays/).

    With the 27" Ultrafine, you're sacrificing a few inches of screen largeness for a noticeable amount of clarity (218PPI vs 138PPI on the BenQ), many more pixels (5120 x 2880 vs 3840 x 2160 on the BenQ), and the LG costs you just $100 more. To me, there's no contest given the value, unless extreme response time is a deal breaker for you.

    The knock on the LG monitors is that they are not great in build quality, but the screens are as good as it gets. Simply put: the 27" LG Ultrafine monitor is the only option available today if you're looking for the clarity of a retina screen, and will be the only economical option when Apple releases their pro display. At least until a competitor else releases a +200 PPI monitor. In the meantime, this BenQ monitor doesn't compare.
    Enjoy your 27" 218 ppi display running a 2650x1440 desktop because running native 5120 x 2880 makes everything too small.  That why I have a 43" 4K monitor running 3200x1800.
    It's called HiDPi scaling that is built into OS X, and actually works.
    And the desktop real estate still is smaller regardless of how well it renders.
    williamlondon
  • Review: The BenQ PD3220U 4K HDR Thunderbolt 3 display is a good option for designers

    smack416 said:
    The trouble with basically any other monitor other than the 27" LG Ultrafine is the PPI. This BenQ is not retina resolution, nor is it well suited to MacOS as a non-retina display (reference: https://bjango.com/articles/macexternaldisplays/).

    With the 27" Ultrafine, you're sacrificing a few inches of screen largeness for a noticeable amount of clarity (218PPI vs 138PPI on the BenQ), many more pixels (5120 x 2880 vs 3840 x 2160 on the BenQ), and the LG costs you just $100 more. To me, there's no contest given the value, unless extreme response time is a deal breaker for you.

    The knock on the LG monitors is that they are not great in build quality, but the screens are as good as it gets. Simply put: the 27" LG Ultrafine monitor is the only option available today if you're looking for the clarity of a retina screen, and will be the only economical option when Apple releases their pro display. At least until a competitor else releases a +200 PPI monitor. In the meantime, this BenQ monitor doesn't compare.
    Enjoy your 27" 218 ppi display running a 2650x1440 desktop because running native 5120 x 2880 makes everything too small.  That why I have a 43" 4K monitor running 3200x1800.
    williamlondonwatto_cobra