Demand for Apple's 13" MacBook Pro may be outpacing supply

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  • Reply 81 of 146
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,551member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by faithfulFrank View Post


    I do regular backups from my 12" powerbook to a WD portable harddrive that plugs into my 12" powerbook with a firewire connection. I planned on just using that to transfer to my new 13" macbookPro. Will that work?



    Sure it will.



    Or you can do what I did when I got my 15" MBP - start the 12" PowerBook in Firewire Target mode (Hold down the T key while booting it until the firewire symbol appears on the screen) then cable it to your new computer and use Migration Assistant to move over your accounts.



    Worked like a champ! I was very pleased at how easily it worked (and the PowerPC to Intel thing didn't even seem to be an issue for my programs as they apparently were all universal binaries).
  • Reply 82 of 146
    bregaladbregalad Posts: 816member
    I find glossy screens force me to look at them from an angle where the background is relatively dark with low contrast. I can't use my iPod touch when it's facing directly at me. I've always got it tilted 10-20% away from me. Doing that with a larger screen, particularly one with an attached keyboard is simply unacceptable. Covering glare with increased brightness is also unacceptable. I do a lot of work with text and need the background white to be soft on my eyes. On many displays that means setting the brightness to less than 30 and I've used one that was too bright to use for more than a few minutes at a time when brightness was set to zero.



    I do understand the problems with matte screens too. Surely there's some sort of happy medium that doesn't cut down the sharpness too much, but gets rid of most of the glare.
  • Reply 83 of 146
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DocNo42 View Post


    Sure it will.



    Or you can do what I did when I got my 15" MBP - start the 12" PowerBook in Firewire Target mode (Hold down the T key while booting it until the firewire symbol appears on the screen) then cable it to your new computer and use Migration Assistant to move over your accounts.



    Isn't the old computer Firewire 400? Can you connect Firewire 400 on one computer to Firewire 800 on the other (no Firewire 400 on the new MBPs)?



    If not, you can accomplish the same thing over the network - either Ethernet or wireless.
  • Reply 84 of 146
    knownikkoknownikko Posts: 29member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jragosta View Post


    Isn't the old computer Firewire 400? Can you connect Firewire 400 on one computer to Firewire 800 on the other (no Firewire 400 on the new MBPs)?



    800 is backward compatible. You just need a 800->400 adapter or cable.
  • Reply 85 of 146
    hobbithobbit Posts: 532member
    I'm not sure if people are aware of this.



    You can order a 13" MBP from ColorWare (those paintjob guys).

    If you get it painted by them they offer all kinds of customizations (coloring different parts in different colors). As a new feature they now also offer a 'Matte Screen' as 'Screen Finish' option.



    This is probably the same as the 17" matte MBP: they simply remove the glass at the front and don't replace it.



    Because of the paintjob options you could still have the aluminium bezel painted shiny black for a similar look - minus the glossy glass in front of the screen. I'd probably chose that.



    Although I have not tried ColorWare, so can't really vouch for them either way. And it seems quite expensive (adds $799 to your 13" MBP price tag for the matte screen and painting).

    But for people considering even the 17" just for the matte option, this might still be a viable solution.



    ColorWare 13" MBP Link





    Maybe helpful for some...
  • Reply 86 of 146
    ddubres79ddubres79 Posts: 101member
    Out of curiosity I would love a detailed demographic breakdown between the 13, 15 and 17 'Pro' models as such:



    1. Professionals who bought one as their business machine. (Not just creatives but anyone who uses it on a daily basis to make money)



    2. K-12 & University students



    3. Adult consumers for home and entertainment (age 21+)



    If it turns out that #1 is the majority of sales for any of the line then apparently Apple has found the perfect balance of power, design and "features". (or lack thereof). But if #2 and #3 turn out to be the top demographics (which I believe they are) then take off the stupid "Pro" nomenclature if that isn't your target audience. It would be like tacking on "pro" to a Dell Mini just to do it.



    My guess would be the 13in model is mainly K-12 + Uni, 15in split between all groups and 17in mostly #1. Of course I'm pulling stats out of my rear but isn't that what forums are good for?
  • Reply 87 of 146
    teckstudteckstud Posts: 6,476member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Bregalad View Post


    I do understand the problems with matte screens too. Surely there's some sort of happy medium that doesn't cut down the sharpness too much, but gets rid of most of the glare.



    There is. Unfortunately SONY uses them- they are a hybrid of both-called XBRITE and they are gorgeous- bright and matte.



    I thought SONY had a patent but now see it's a TM.
  • Reply 88 of 146
    ddubres79ddubres79 Posts: 101member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Bregalad View Post


    I do understand the problems with matte screens too. Surely there's some sort of happy medium that doesn't cut down the sharpness too much, but gets rid of most of the glare.



    They had a middle ground and it was called 'glossy'. The new Apple products are 'glassy' with a sheet of what seems to be untreated glass which is a lot more reflective than a plastic glossy screen. If you live near a best buy or something check out a normal plastic glossy then go check out a Macbook, there is a difference.
  • Reply 89 of 146
    capnbobcapnbob Posts: 388member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by macmatte View Post


    I would argue differently. In sales & marketing, the Pareto principle ? 80/20 Rule ? applies, namely that most sales come from a core of users. Equal sales are not generated equally across the population. The 80/20 Rule says that 80% of your sales come from 20% of your clients. Therefore, I would argue that people who post comments on Mac websites are more representative of this minority that generates the most sales. Why do we read Mac websites? So we can buy the stuff that interests us. ?..



    I would suggest that the reality of an 80:20 rule was the historical problem for Apple and what Steve Job's entire strategy for 12 years has been designed to break. When Apple was at its nadir, only the hardcore fans and "pro" users were really keeping Apple afloat. 80:20 probably applied. The massive expansion into the high-end consumer market I believe has been an attempt to reverse this position. What is replacing the traditionally dominant logic of Pareto theory these days is the "Long Tail" where you efficiently sell/market to tap the many more but less frequent/hardcore customers in the long tail of a frequency curve. Apple has done this brilliantly through its products, stores and marketing. I would very much doubt that 80:20 applies to Apple these days, especially since "bulk/fleet" orders are not as significant for Apple (except for the odd Education deal), compared to Dell/HP. They were built on a hybrid model - 80:20 applied to the corporate business, but direct consumer/small biz sales could tap the long tail. Now corp buyers are cutting back, the impacts are massive on the Dell/HP bottom line - much bigger than for Apple.



    "Pros" are still significant because of their higher average spend/$ margin per head but there is no growth there - that is mostly in the tail. Thus, I don't think your math works on the $s given up for not doing a matte screen. It is obviously something but I would think it would be an order of magnitude smaller than your estimate. Can't prove it obviously... ;-)
  • Reply 90 of 146
    brucepbrucep Posts: 2,823member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by teckstud View Post


    I plan to get that 13" MBP next. Right now I'm having a blast with my new iPhone.



    My 15' MBP 3.02 GHz 500g 7400 rpm is awaiting me when i return from vacation. Its sitting in the fed ex office .



    Why not get the 15' yourself. You get 2 chips .



    9
  • Reply 91 of 146
    brucepbrucep Posts: 2,823member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ghostface147 View Post


    Well I would think that the wireless antenna has improved recently, but there are other outside influences that can affect your Wi-Fi signal. If too many people are using the same channel, that could interfere. 2.4 Ghz devices could also interfere, so in reality, YMMV. I have had no Wi-Fi issues with my 2007 MBP in regards to signal strength. As far as buyer's remorse, I think you have 30 days to return the product if you are not happy with it.



    If he uses the <n> system and has an airport extreme and and a airport express somewhere else in the same location he should a have a far range no matter what. But the setup can be tricky. BEST that he reads up first on apple site.
  • Reply 92 of 146
    brucepbrucep Posts: 2,823member
    edit

    9
  • Reply 93 of 146
    brucepbrucep Posts: 2,823member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Carmissimo View Post


    Exactly. Apple is offering a choice.



    Based on the premise that some pros might need X, Y, or Z, one could argue that any computer that doesn't meet the needs of the most demanding pro customer out there should not be labelled a MacBook Pro. As such, it could be claimed the 15" Pro shouldn't be classified as a pro machine, especially in base form with a slower processor.



    And what of the 17" MacBook Pro sporting in base form a 5400 RPM drive? How could Apple call that machine a pro machine if there are pros out there who have to have at least a 7,200 RPM drive? And what's with that glossy screen? Apple's standards, clearly, are far too low if they dare to use the Pro label on that abomination.



    The whole MBP line up are the finest laptops ever made,

    From the uni-body to the software to the powerful insides



    Even the MBA is very high class.



    Your Complaints are silly and ill-informed.

    PRO denotes a powerful device that is seamless in all ways .



    9
  • Reply 94 of 146
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,475member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Lancelot9201 View Post


    i'm so surprised to hear that any of the MBP line is selling well. I never would have thought that anyone would want an internal battery, which guarantee's a service need at some point, & the totally unacceptable Glossy screen. I've been waiting & had planned to upgrade soon until I saw Apple's new MBP offerings. I'm so disappointed that i"m going to a "hackintosh" when my current 15" MBP dies. I guess you could say that my 12 yr. love affair with Apple has finally ended..



    Do us a favor will you. Instead of building a hackintosh just make a clean break and go Windows PC. Then we won't have to read your drivel here anymore.
  • Reply 95 of 146
    zandroszandros Posts: 537member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mstone View Post


    Ok I was replying to someone who commented that the 2006 MBP batteries were failing. Just in case you were wondering, LI-poly is still LI-ion technology although the density and substrate is different. The aging issue is not documented as being any better to my knowledge. You do get more power because the density is greater.



    There are, to my knowledge, no difference between the 2006 MBP batteries and the 2008 MBP batteries, so assuming that he got old batteries when he replaced the malfunctioning ones is probably not a good answer to the problem. After all, he's gone through multiple replacements.



    Also, since Apple differentiates between Li-ion (Powerbooks/iBooks) and Li-polymer (Intel notebooks, iPods, etc.), and battery care for the types differ, it would be helpful to do the same.
  • Reply 96 of 146
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,756member
    delete.
  • Reply 97 of 146
    carmissimocarmissimo Posts: 837member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by brucep View Post


    The whole MBP line up are the finest laptops ever made,

    From the uni-body to the software to the powerful insides



    Even the MBA is very high class.



    Your Complaints are silly and ill-informed.

    PRO denotes a powerful device that is seamless in all ways .



    9



    I don't have the least bit of a problem with Apple's latest laptop offerings. They are excellent and my point, which you seem to have missed, is that one size doesn't fit all.



    Not every potential buyer has the same needs and even professionals have different situations in which one offering in the Mac laptop line-up is better suited than another.



    Pro, really, is a term that Apple uses to denote a certain calibre of machine and every one of their Pro laptops are justifiably being marketed by Apple as top-end devices. I was responding, evidently a little too flippantly to be understood, to the notion that if a member of the Pro family isn't ideal for every imaginable professional customer that it shouldn't be called a Pro.



    The bottom line is, different strokes for different folks. Apple is offering a laptop pro line-up that covers a lot of bases. This is a good thing.
  • Reply 98 of 146
    mr. hmr. h Posts: 4,819member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by brucep View Post


    Your Complaints are silly and ill-informed.

    PRO denotes a powerful device that is seamless in all ways .



    He was being sarcastic, brucep.
  • Reply 99 of 146
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,756member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Lancelot9201 View Post


    i'm so surprised to hear that any of the MBP line is selling well. I never would have thought that anyone would want an internal battery, which guarantee's a service need at some point, & the totally unacceptable Glossy screen. I've been waiting & had planned to upgrade soon until I saw Apple's new MBP offerings. I'm so disappointed that i"m going to a "hackintosh" when my current 15" MBP dies. I guess you could say that my 12 yr. love affair with Apple has finally ended..



    I never would have thought that anyone would want an internal battery, which guarantee's a service need at some point.



    Nope. Apple's internal batteries are designed to last for the life of the machine.



    the totally unacceptable Glossy screen.



    Not according to demand. In fact, Macbooks have always sold very well, glossy or not. Seems it's only a small minority on internet forums that are making a fuss over it. It is acknowledged that Macbooks set the bar for the rest of the industry. They sell like crazy, especially now. I doubt anyone outside of the forums knows what a hackintosh is, and I seriously doubt the average consumer wants those. In fact, the Psystar fiasco is proving they don't!
  • Reply 100 of 146
    teckstudteckstud Posts: 6,476member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by brucep View Post


    My 15' MBP 3.02 GHz 500g 7400 rpm is awaiting me when i return from vacation. Its sitting in the fed ex office .



    Why not get the 15' yourself. You get 2 chips .



    9



    Well I want to get the 13". Can I still get my chip?
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