iPad iBooks app US-only, McGraw-Hill absent from Apple event

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited January 2014
In unveiling its new iBook application and iBookstore for the iPad, Apple highlighted a number of publishers with which it has content agreements. But those deals, for now, are U.S.-only, and one glaring omission stood out from the list: McGraw-Hill [updated with comments from the publisher].



Apple has begun launching international Web sites to promote the iPad, and the Australian page comes with a small footnote that reads: "iBooks available in the U.S. only."



iBooks is a new application unveiled by Apple Wednesday that features a 3D virtual bookshelf with a user's personal collection. It also contains a link to the iBookstore, which allows users to purchase and download books from a variety of publishers.



"We've got five of the largest publishers in the world that are supporting us in this and are going to have all of their books on the store," CEO Steve Jobs said during Wednesday's keynote. "And we're going to open up the floodgates for the rest of the publishers in the world starting this afternoon."



Highlighted in the presentation were HarperCollins, Penguin, Simon & Schuster, Macmillan and Hachette Book Group. Many of those companies were revealed weeks ago to be in talks with Apple.







But absent Wednesday was one major publisher that claims to have a part in the iBookstore: McGraw-Hill.



Appearing on television Tuesday, Terry McGraw, CEO of publisher McGraw-Hill, revealed that the iPad would run the iPhone OS and would allow software to be "transferrable" between the iPad and the iPhone.



McGraw's comments came as speculation over the iPad, then simply known as a forthcoming tablet from Apple, was at a fever pitch, less than 24 hours before Apple's planned product unveiling. McGraw also gave the first official confirmation that the iPad would run the iPhone OS, revealing a crucial element of the then-secret device prior to Jobs' presentation.



Update: Contacted by DigitalDaily, a McGraw-Hill spokesperson said the CEO's comments about the iPad were merely speculative, and the company had no prior information on the device.



Some other publications have outright stated that McGraw-Hill was ousted from Wednesday's event due to McGraw's comments. But the company noted Wednesday that Apple featured only the products of trade publishers during the keynote. McGraw-Hill's education programs were never a part of the negotiations.



"(McGraw's) speculative comments about Apple’s pending launch, which he shared earlier in the day in a call with investors, were simply intended to suggest that if the new device were to use iPhone applications, many of our education products would be compatible with the technology and could be made easily available on it," the statement said. "Unfortunately, it seems that many mistakenly interpreted his comments as being more specific to yesterday’s announcement."







The iPad runs iPhone OS 3.2, a new version of the mobile operating system that, for the moment, is iPad-only. On Wednesday, Apple released a new software development kit that allows developers to test their existing iPhone applications or create new iPad-specific ones in a new iPad "simulator."
«1345

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 96
    estyleestyle Posts: 201member
    They could have just agreed a day or two before - no malice in the situation between Apple, Steve, and McGraw, just late in the game.

    The leak was their consolation prize for not being able to get on the slide that close to presentation.
  • Reply 2 of 96
    These people need Apple desperately.



    If Apple isn't distributing your content, your content won't get very far.
  • Reply 3 of 96
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,787member
    Probably a snub at the event for breaking the non-disclosure but I doubt Apple would literally drop them as it would lose them revenue.



    Meanwhile I simply cannot fathom why AAPL isn't through the roof!
  • Reply 4 of 96
    So what major publishers are missing? Is there a list of top publishers somewhere?



    EDIT:



    Random House (15.9% market share)

    *Pearson (Penguin) (11%)

    *HarperCollins (10.6%)

    *Simon & Schuster (9.3%)

    *Hachette (6.2%)

    Scholastic (5.2%)

    Thomas Nelson (4.7%)

    Holtzbrinck (4.4%)

    Tyndale House (1.9%)

    Wiley (1.9%)



    So Random House is really the missing piece of the puzzle.
  • Reply 5 of 96
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by petertemplar View Post


    So what major publishers are missing? Is there a list of top publishers somewhere?



    EDIT:



    Random House (15.9% market share)

    *Pearson (Penguin) (11%)

    *HarperCollins (10.6%)

    *Simon & Schuster (9.3%)

    *Hachette (6.2%)

    Scholastic (5.2%)

    Thomas Nelson (4.7%)

    Holtzbrinck (4.4%)

    Tyndale House (1.9%)

    Wiley (1.9%)



    So Random House is really the missing piece of the puzzle.



    Indeed. Puts the lack of McGraw Hill into perspective. They probably weren't mentioned because they are not that big.



    I think most publishers will see this as a good opportunity, but it's the newspapers who really stand to gain.
  • Reply 6 of 96
    ivladivlad Posts: 742member
    And we're surprised because...?
  • Reply 7 of 96
    So this article is simply stating that, since the CEO McGraw-Hill prematurely divulged what OS the iPad would be running during his interview (with the BEAUTIFUL ERIN BURNETT) on CNBC, Jobs in-return decided to omit the company during the keynote presentation as a type of reprove measure for that fortuitous slip up???



    If that's what the article is saying then it sounds Arbitrary IMO.
  • Reply 8 of 96
    This REALLY sucks. I was all for the iPad before they decided that the UK doesn't want to read. Nutters.



    I bet they'll use the excuse that "the UK market isn't ready yet" which is rubbish. It's they who aren't ready.
  • Reply 9 of 96
    That was such an rookie move by a CEO.
  • Reply 10 of 96
    estyleestyle Posts: 201member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


    Probably a snub at the event for breaking the non-disclosure but I doubt Apple would literally drop them as it would lose them revenue.



    Meanwhile I simply cannot fathom why AAPL isn't through the roof!



    You must not have watched the State of the Union address. The market is far unhappier with the President than it is excited by Steve the Wunderkind.
  • Reply 11 of 96
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GlynC View Post


    This REALLY sucks. I was all for the iPad before they decided that the UK doesn't want to read. Nutters.



    I bet they'll use the excuse that "the UK market isn't ready yet" which is rubbish. It's they who aren't ready.



    Right. I don´t understand this reluctance to open up to other markets. What does ready mean anyway?
  • Reply 12 of 96
    estyleestyle Posts: 201member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by slapppy View Post


    That was such an rookie move by a CEO.



    or it might be the fact that McGraw hill gets half its revenue from S&P and the comment would be worth more than selling ebooks.
  • Reply 13 of 96
    Hell hath no fury like a pissed off Steve Jobs!
  • Reply 14 of 96
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


    Probably a snub at the event for breaking the non-disclosure but I doubt Apple would literally drop them as it would lose them revenue.



    Meanwhile I simply cannot fathom why AAPL isn't through the roof!



    Maybe because the reception has been lukewarm?
  • Reply 15 of 96
    estyleestyle Posts: 201member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hal 9000 View Post


    Right. I don´t understand this reluctance to open up to other markets. What does ready mean anyway?



    is this limited by Apple, publishers, or trade laws?



    I remember it took a while for apple to get the music industry to allow international sales, and it still is fairly restricted.



    but Steve did say that they are engaging international publishing market currently. England will read again!
  • Reply 16 of 96
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post


    Probably a snub at the event for breaking the non-disclosure but I doubt Apple would literally drop them as it would lose them revenue.



    Meanwhile I simply cannot fathom why AAPL isn't through the roof!



    Maybe because the reception has been lukewarm? The market is not as compulsive a fanboy buyers.
  • Reply 17 of 96
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hal 9000 View Post


    Right. I don´t understand this reluctance to open up to other markets. What does ready mean anyway?



    Like everything else dealing with the EU is far different then dealing 'at home', even canada has to wait longer for products and features. Hell you still can't watch HULU in canada, it's all about money ... fees / taxes / royalties etc., boys.
  • Reply 18 of 96
    estyleestyle Posts: 201member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TEKSTUD View Post


    Maybe because the reception has been lukewarm?



    I sold my AAPL stock in the last week of 2009 for tax purposes, planning to buy it back after the transaction cleared. I had no idea that was going to be the 52-week high and that it would drop 15$/share four weeks later.
  • Reply 19 of 96
    US only is ridiculous! you have the app store everywhere, how is an e-book store different? i live in PR and am not sure if we are counted as US or not, just because of this doubt i probably wont buy. I am probably going to move to the states within the next 6 months but i would be constantly traveling back, does that mean i have to purchase books in the states and not be able to back home?????? i was seriously considering buying the ipad as a compliment to my mbp15 for college, as its the perfect size to lay on a desk and take notes on the new pages app without disrupting your view forward, and its alot better to carry around a 600 32gb tablet than a 2000 laptop, i would die if they stole my mbp or if it broke in some freak accident. an ipad by contrast, i can save some more money and buy a new one, sync with my computer and vuala! same ipad as before. I definately would have been happier if the store was international because i really was considering transfering back to a college in PR, now if I do transfer back I could only use the ipad for play, might as well get an ipod touch for half the price

    and almost forgot the biggest perk would have been carrying around one tablet vs a stack of heavy text books and random novels for my spanish and english classes: broken back vs 1.5 pound tablet
  • Reply 20 of 96
    antkm1antkm1 Posts: 1,441member
    i think the reason for no McGraw/Hill is basically because MH didn't buy into the iPad concept at launch. I think that guy was trying to toot his proverbial horn even though his company hadn't yet adopted the business model. Perhaps because they wanted to see the reaction to the iPad before spending the time and money into it. I'm guessing more publishers will come after the iPad goes on said and we start to see real numbers. Kind of like the Kindle.



    The real questions we should ask here are:

    1. will iBooks be available to the rest of the world anytime soon?

    2. Will iBooks App be available for download on the iPhone/Touch?

    3. What will they cost? We've heard rumor that they will be between $12-$15 each. Amazon sells for around $9.99 and less.

    4. Will other e-book formats be supported on the iPad?



    Amazon already has a really strong lead on Apple. If they want to start competing, they need an edge that Amazon doesn't. Amazon already has an App for the kindle on the iPhone and Touch. So i'd safely say the Kindle Store is up +2 already.
Sign In or Register to comment.