WSJ has pre-release iPad kept 'under padlock and key' by Apple

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited January 2014
Apple's legendary secrecy around the iPad continues even though the company formally introduced the hardware over a month ago, as media mogul Rupert Murdoch revealed The Wall Street Journal, in developing an iPad edition, has a pre-release model that is checked in on nightly by the Cupertino, Calif., company.



Murdoch confirmed during a speech in New York on Tuesday that his News Corp. publication will be offered on Apple's forthcoming iPad. According to a report in the Journal, the executive also gave insight into Apple's secretive practices as the paper has had access to a pre-release iPad.



"In fact, we've been allowed to work on one, and it's under padlock and key. The key is turned by Apple every night," Murdoch was quoted as saying. "But we will be on that with The Wall Street Journal."



The Journal and Apple had an iPad-related altercation last month when editor Alan Murray posted to Twitter from the device when Apple co-founder Steve Jobs visited the paper to pitch its e-reader capabilities. That incident reportedly upset Jobs, who was said to be "furious" and allegedly had the editor delete the post. In a subsequent e-mail, Murray would not confirm the incident, but merely said that "Apple's general paranoia about news coverage is truly extraordinary."



The Journal is yet another high-profile publication confirmed for the iPad. At the device's unveiling in January, a New York Times application replicating the daily edition of the paper was prominently featured. And last week, the Associated Press revealed it too is building an app for the iPad based on a subscription model.



How much to charge for content on the iPad and other devices remains a point of contention. While reports have suggested that Times executives cannot agree whether to charge $10 per month or closer to $30 per month, the Journal began charging users of its iPhone application late last year. Murdoch has previously said that News Corp. intends to charge for all of its online news sites, noting that "quality journalism is not cheap."



The executive added Tuesday that he believes the iPad is just the first in a number of devices that many will use to read newspapers on a daily basis. He reportedly said there will be a "half dozen or more" introduced in the next year.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 69
    foo2foo2 Posts: 1,077member
    These are just the sort of safeguards necessary to protect the intellectual property, and who wouldn't be irate if a weak link in the chain of confidentiality was exposed?
  • Reply 2 of 69
    yesicanyesican Posts: 46member
    Quote:

    The executive added Tuesday that he believes the iPad is just the first in a number of devices that many will use to read newspapers on a daily basis. He reportedly said there will be a "half dozen or more" introduced in the next year.





    While every newpaper along with any other publication for that matter will be able to be read on the iPad , the question still remains: Will they be with or without flash content as were all the blank portions of the NY Times during iPad's unveiling by SJ?
  • Reply 3 of 69
    souliisoulsouliisoul Posts: 827member
    This is going to be interesting with concern to Flash not being available on iPad and majority of sites using Flash as standard at present.



    I wonder who is going to 'blink first' Apple or potential clients who use Flash. Believe me this is not simple answer, since Apple have massive presence in the media industry and have shown to be winner with majority of his media focused products (exception is Apple TV, which really just requires some focus by Apple and not just an hobby).



    I will see what happens before I purchase an iPad, since specs could change rather quickly depending on the customer interest, potential clients wiliness to accept no Flash approach and pricing of iPad and media content.
  • Reply 4 of 69
    adamiigsadamiigs Posts: 355member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by yesiCan View Post


    While every newpaper along with any other publication for that matter will be able to be read on the iPad , the question still remains: Will they be with or without flash content as were all the blank portions of the NY Times during iPad's unveiling by SJ?



    Companies are already proclaiming they are making versions of their media and sites without flash just for the iPhone / iPad, yesterday VIrgin said they are launch their various sites without flash just for that reason, and they have a damn lot of companies and media.
  • Reply 5 of 69
    kozchriskozchris Posts: 209member
    I bet this is going to open a whole new world to comic and comic book publishers. Can't wait to see what happens. To have the complete Calvin and Hobbs collection on an iPad would be nice.
  • Reply 6 of 69
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by yesiCan View Post


    While every newpaper along with any other publication for that matter will be able to be read on the iPad , the question still remains: Will they be with or without flash content as were all the blank portions of the NY Times during iPad's unveiling by SJ?



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by souliisoul View Post


    This is going to be interesting with concern to Flash not being available on iPad and majority of sites using Flash as standard at present.



    Have you two not seen the mobile version of websites that cater to mobiles? This is no different. You can still have a site with Flash for applicable systems.
  • Reply 7 of 69
    allblueallblue Posts: 393member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Murdoch has previously said that News Corp. intends to charge for all of its online news sites, noting that "quality journalism is not cheap."

    ]



    Surely that quote should read "cheap journalism is not quality"? It is Murdoch speaking after all.
  • Reply 8 of 69
    shadowshadow Posts: 373member
    WSJ needs a device to test it's application on it. A native app can do more than Flash, and way better. If they were to use flash there was no point having a device or make an app for that matter.



    The take away from this report (it's not a rumor, right?):



    Apple vs. Adobe Flash - 1 : 0
  • Reply 9 of 69
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AdamIIGS View Post


    Companies are already proclaiming they are making versions of their media and sites without flash just for the iPhone / iPad, yesterday VIrgin said they are launch their various sites without flash just for that reason, and they have a damn lot of companies and media.



    While the Virgin isn't some huge defeat for Adobe it's telling of things to come, like frogs crocking before a storm. Most sites that use Flash simply don't need to and there are plenty of web standards easily supported by IE7+ and others that make a page ender faster and be less crash prone. Add the cost savings from having to support Flash when you can use HTML, CSS, and JS, which you already pay for, and a potential saving on data usage.



    The first real wave won't likely start until we see video make the move. That means Hulu and others make the switch along with YouTube and Vimeo default to the HTML5 video (with Flash as a fallback) if you are using the appropriate browser, but there are still issues with the JS controls before that can happen.
  • Reply 10 of 69
    woohoo!woohoo! Posts: 291member
    I hope the prices for news content is inexpensive and no subscription is required (or optional), this way people can try before they buy and get a lot of good content at a reasonable total monthly costs.



    For instance I would like to receive the Wall Street Journal as a subscription; try the New York Times on a per day, Sunday only, to see if I like it; some other investment and trade newspapers, perhaps a few trade magazines and so on.



    I don't want to go broke doing it neither, and it has to be a nice seamless experience, auto-updating etc like iTunes does.



    One good thing about charging less to begin with, especially with something that's really not costing publishers anymore but transferring existing electronic files, is that they can always raise prices later.
  • Reply 11 of 69
    woohoo!woohoo! Posts: 291member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kozchris View Post


    I bet this is going to open a whole new world to comic and comic book publishers. Can't wait to see what happens. To have the complete Calvin and Hobbs collection on an iPad would be nice.





    Good point, the iPad is going to be very popular with the young at heart crowd (as games are on the iPod Touch) so comics would certainly make a good sell on the iPad.
  • Reply 12 of 69
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 18,748member
    WSJ? I don't think these guys would trust even the Fed or Fort Knox!
  • Reply 13 of 69
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Woohoo! View Post


    Good point, the iPad is going to be very popular with the young at heart crowd (as games are on the iPod Touch) so comics would certainly make a good sell on the iPad.



    Interactive comics. Imagine having a Burns Effect in certain panels or a very simple animation adding to the story. The trick will be to keep it subtle so it adds to the story without taking it over.
  • Reply 14 of 69
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Woohoo! View Post


    I hope the prices for news content is inexpensive and no subscription is required (or optional), this way people can try before they buy and get a lot of good content at a reasonable total monthly costs.



    For instance I would like to receive the Wall Street Journal as a subscription; try the New York Times on a per day, Sunday only, to see if I like it; some other investment and trade newspapers, perhaps a few trade magazines and so on.



    I don't want to go broke doing it neither, and it has to be a nice seamless experience, auto-updating etc like iTunes does.



    One good thing about charging less to begin with, especially with something that's really not costing publishers anymore but transferring existing electronic files, is that they can always raise prices later.



    I like the idea of buying a single issue of a magazine or a single edition of the newspaper or maybe a single-day's access to a newspaper site - just like a newsstand.
  • Reply 15 of 69
    cxc273cxc273 Posts: 46member
    I wonder if Stephen Colbert still has the iPad he was showing off at the Grammy Awards.



    Back to the iPad, I hope more publications embrace the iPad. I'd love to transition all of my print subscriptions to digital ones.
  • Reply 16 of 69
    ivladivlad Posts: 739member
    I think its because there are few features which hasn't been shown yet. They did same thing with first iPhone.
  • Reply 17 of 69
    ivladivlad Posts: 739member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cxc273 View Post


    I wonder if Stephen Colbert still has the iPad he was showing off at the Grammy Awards.



    Back to the iPad, I hope more publications embrace the iPad. I'd love to transition all of my print subscriptions to digital ones.



    HAHAAA, good point. I wonder how he managed to get that kind of deal. I doubt that he still has it. Maybe in his house in Apple's vault.
  • Reply 18 of 69
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    I wonder if Apple will reject apps if they use too much resources. ('too much' being subjective to SJ whim)



    Reason I mention it is that it is entirely possible that a stand alone app for rich media presentation could easily consume as much or more battery life than Flash. And to take this one step further: There is already a javascript swf interpreter out there so a developer could theoretically create an app that could import swf content onto an iPhone. To be honest, I have already done it however I have not submitted it as it is way too crude at the moment. Just a feasibility study.
  • Reply 19 of 69
    cu10cu10 Posts: 294member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    "...The key is turned by Apple every night,"



    Now THAT's security.
  • Reply 20 of 69
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by yesiCan View Post


    While every newpaper along with any other publication for that matter will be able to be read on the iPad , the question still remains: Will they be with or without flash content as were all the blank portions of the NY Times during iPad's unveiling by SJ?



    Yes - the flash ads won't be visible by default. It works just like my ad blocker in FireFox. It's neat!
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