iPad attracts developers to App Store, distracts from rival markets

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
The launch of the iPad is helping Apple's iTunes App Store to retain developers' interest while preventing them from exploring alternative marketplaces for mobile software.



A report by the Wall Street Journal cited Social Gaming Network, an App Store developer, as saying that 90% of its employees were currently working on iPhone OS apps.



The fact that RIM, Palm, Microsoft, and Google have also opened their own mobile application stores has not automatically created the same level of success. "You have to choose your battles wisely," SGN chief executive Shervin Pishewar told the Journal.



The new iPad, the Journal said, "is boosting developer interest in Apple's store because the device is set to expand the audience for apps and paves the way for developers to introduce new innovations."



iPad + iPod touch + iPhone



Analysts are estimating Apple will sell anywhere between 5 to 10 million iPad units in its first year. Those numbers will add to the existing installed base of iPhone OS devices, which now number more than 70 million.



Just as the iPod touch has served to bolster Apple's software position on the iPhone in a way that rival smartphones can't match, the iPad will also expand the App Store reach and level of sophistication in ways that rivals' tablet devices won't.



Google hopes to release tablet-form factor devices later this year using the Chrome OS, reliant upon both web apps and Flash content. But Chrome OS won't run today's existing Android apps.



Similarly, Microsoft has floated Tablet PC, UMPC and most recently Slate PC designs, but these are all based on its desktop Windows platform, and don't support either its now mothballed Windows Mobile 6.x platform of mobile apps nor its planned Windows Phone 7 devices designed to run Silverlight and Flash apps.



Microsoft's futuristic Courier product concept is expected to one day merge with WP7 and the Zune HD to result in a cohesive development strategy like the one Apple created with iPhone 2.0 back in 2008, but even if that can happen by early next year, it will be years late to the App Store party.



Problems facing alternative mobile software markets



Palm's webOS launched its mobile software Catalog last year, but that was still too late to attract enthusiasm from many developers. Google's Android Marketplace opened back in 2008 just a few months after Apple launched the App Store, but even it has seen a difficult time keeping pace with Apple's level of interested users and developers.



In addition to having failed to capitalize on the importance of building out an application strategy early and comprehensively, other platform vendors have also made it much more difficult for their developers to build apps that can run seamlessly on their products.



The Journal noted, "Apple's devices also have key features that help play up apps, such as high-quality color touch-screens, accelerometers and relatively fast processors." While many Android phones offer fancy hardware features, each new model introduces a new mix of specifications in terms of screen resolution, processor speed and available hardware features. This complicates the task of building apps that work and look good across all those devices.



Many Android phones (as well as smartphones from other alternative platforms) are also stuck running the version of the OS they shipped with, thanks to apathetic mobile operators who lose interest in supporting upgrades after making the sale, if not for actual limitations in the hardware that make upgrades impossible.



Even developers who sell their apps across a wide number of platforms focus their attention on the iPhone. The Journal cited Pandora Media's chief strategy officer Tim Westergren, who sells a version of his company's Internet radio app for Android, Palm's webOS, and RIM's BlackBerry in addition to the iPhone, as noting that his company gets almost a third of its new registrations from the iPhone, even though iPhone 3.0 currently prevents Pandora from running in the background.



Despite that hurdle and the interest other platforms are making for his attention, Westergren told the Journal, "if there's a new opportunity on the iPhone, we would prioritize it."
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 35
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,741member
    Apple has this market all figured out and locked up for the next 5 years, at least.
  • Reply 2 of 35
    Now if only we developers could trust Apple to not destroy our companies on a whim, using private APIs and their "War Chest" funding, then we'd all be a lot happier, and feel more secure.



    "Word Processing? *WHAM* MARKET DEAD! Spreadsheets? *WHAM* MARKET DEAD! Presentation Software? *WHAM* MARKET DEAD! Voice Memos? *WHAM* MARKET DEAD! eBooks? *WHAM* MARKET DEAD!" (And along with them go about a dozen+ startups each, along with their employees / jobs)
  • Reply 3 of 35
    spotonspoton Posts: 645member
    Quote:

    The launch of the iPad is helping Apple's iTunes App Store to retain developers' interest while preventing them from exploring alternative marketplaces for mobile software.





    Well Apple does cater to the high end of the computer user spectrum.



    Take a look at this:



    Quote:

    ?Thirty-six percent of Apple computer owners reported household incomes greater than $100,000, compared to 21 percent of all consumers. ?With a higher household income, though, it?s not a surprise that those consumers are making more electronics purchases,? Baker said. ?The average Apple household owns 48 CE devices whereas the average computer household owns about 24. Apple household owners? actions and purchases can be used by the industry as leading indicators for hot new products and adoption.?





    http://www.npd.com/press/releases/press_091005.html





    Phil Schiller stated that the consumer market is more than 50% of the total market, and that's why Apple is a consumer products company.



    It just makes sense for software developers of consumer software to spend their energies in the smaller, higher end market first, then take what's successful there and apply it to the rest.



    The rest of the consumer smart phone market in my opinion is rather fragmented. Apple makes just one iPhone, although I think it would be good if they made three models.
  • Reply 4 of 35
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Quadra 610 View Post


    Apple has this market all figured out and locked up for the next 5 years, at least.





    I agree, Apple will be one of the tablet heavyweights for many years to come. As with the iPhone, the iPad will be a homerun. It's not for everybody, but I know I want one.
  • Reply 5 of 35
    mdriftmeyermdriftmeyer Posts: 7,174member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by The Madcapper View Post


    Now if only we developers could trust Apple to not destroy our companies on a whim, using private APIs and their "War Chest" funding, then we'd all be a lot happier, and feel more secure.



    "Word Processing? *WHAM* MARKET DEAD! Spreadsheets? *WHAM* MARKET DEAD! Presentation Software? *WHAM* MARKET DEAD! Voice Memos? *WHAM* MARKET DEAD! eBooks? *WHAM* MARKET DEAD!" (And along with them go about a dozen+ startups each, along with their employees / jobs)



    Word Processing? MS Office. Spreadsheets? MS Office. Presentation Software? MS Office.



    All competing against iWorks for iPad.



    eBooks? Write a damn novel. Write a more media rich Reader. Work on a solution for Marvel or graphic novels.



    Do people have to give you business ideas in order for you to make a living?
  • Reply 6 of 35
    aaarrrggghaaarrrgggh Posts: 1,564member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by The Madcapper View Post


    Now if only we developers could trust Apple to not destroy our companies on a whim, using private APIs and their "War Chest" funding, then we'd all be a lot happier, and feel more secure.



    What do you think Apple should do? Customers want it, aren't satisfied with 3rd party solutions (or can't find them). Apple does it less for the software sales and more for device sales.



    If an idea is truly novel, that is another ball game, but many of your examples are more beating apple to the punch.
  • Reply 7 of 35
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by The Madcapper View Post




    "Word Processing? *WHAM* MARKET DEAD! Spreadsheets? *WHAM* MARKET DEAD! Presentation Software? *WHAM* MARKET DEAD! Voice Memos? *WHAM* MARKET DEAD! eBooks? *WHAM* MARKET DEAD!" (And along with them go about a dozen+ startups each, along with their employees / jobs)



    Why do you say all these markets are dead? Apple has every right to sell its software on the iPad and as they are separate downloads. No one is forcing anyone to buy or download them. Just because Apple has produced software in each of these markets doesn't mean the market is dead. It just means you as a developer have to work that little bit harder to make us want your product.



    That said, I will be buying Pages and Keynote for the iPad as they are on my Mac. But, there is nothing to stop any developer from producing those products for the Mac and iPad and providing some competition. I agree, it would be an uphill battle in that market but how would you fair in any other market. You would still have fight with the big boys.



    BTW, iWork for iPad was announced at the launch, so I'm not sure how many companies would have been working on producing productivity apps for it as there was no real knowledge of the device and definitely no SDK.



    As for ebooks, I don't live in the US so iBooks is of no consequence to me. Give me something that doesn't restrict the the type of format that is used. I can then buy ebooks from wherever I like and read them. I can't see why this category is dead.



    I can't comment on voice memo apps as I'm just not sure why that market would be dead.



    Even if all the markets you have mentioned are dead, put some better products into other exiting markets or better still invent new ones, be creative and make us, the consumer, want your product. If you can't do that, don't whinge as you shouldn't be in the business to start with.
  • Reply 8 of 35
    zc456zc456 Posts: 96member
    Apple found they're market.
  • Reply 9 of 35
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Zc456 View Post


    Apple found they're market.



    Huh?
  • Reply 10 of 35
    mactelmactel Posts: 1,275member
    Once the iPad takes off then the next logical step is for Apple is updating the AppleTV to run iPad applications. However that will mean that Apple will need to develop a wireless controller.
  • Reply 11 of 35
    jmmxjmmx Posts: 341member
    All this sounds exactly like the predictions that Apple aficionados were making two years ago.
  • Reply 12 of 35
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacTel View Post


    Once the iPad takes off then the next logical step is for Apple is updating the AppleTV to run iPad applications. However that will mean that Apple will need to develop a wireless controller.



    And a way for all the direct-multi-touch inputs to be interpreted on a "sideways" mounted display with a different display ratio. I don't see that happening. That is just a money pit of an idea.



    However, I do feel that the iPhone OS, sans Cocoa Touch, and the A4 chip used in the iPad would be a great foundation for the next AppleTV, AirPort Extreme Base Station , Time Capsule, and a new product category for an Apple Home Server with 3-5 3.5" HDDs.
  • Reply 13 of 35
    jmmxjmmx Posts: 341member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacTel View Post


    Once the iPad takes off then the next logical step is for Apple is updating the AppleTV to run iPad applications. However that will mean that Apple will need to develop a wireless controller.



    Controller exists:

    today - iPhone/iPod touch

    tomorrow - iPad.
  • Reply 14 of 35
    zc456zc456 Posts: 96member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by The-Steve View Post


    Huh?



    Think about. They practically monopolized phone industry. Something the Macs haven't been able to do since Windows became dominant. Apple even said they become more a mobile device company then desktop in recent years.
  • Reply 15 of 35
    hill60hill60 Posts: 6,989member
    I thought developers wanted a free and open environment where they can give away their products for free under Open Source Licenses.



    Maybe I've been hanging out at too many Tech sites where it is assumed that the love and adoration of the geek community outweighs mere money.
  • Reply 16 of 35
    richlrichl Posts: 2,213member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Prince McLean


    Many Android phones (as well as smartphones from other alternative platforms) are also stuck running the version of the OS they shipped with, thanks to apathetic mobile operators who lose interest in supporting upgrades after making the sale,



    Care to name a few examples?



    Every Android smartphone from a major manufacturer that I can name has either had its software upgraded at least once since shipping or is running 1.6 (which is, as far as I'm aware, the latest version available non-Google Experience devices at the moment).
  • Reply 17 of 35
    hill60hill60 Posts: 6,989member
    This one:-



    http://www.htc.com/europe/product/magic/gallery.html



    Take note of the "with Google" on the back, indicating a Google experience phone.



    Malware is an optional extra.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by RichL View Post


    Care to name a few examples?



    Every Android smartphone from a major manufacturer that I can name has either had its software upgraded at least once since shipping or is running 1.6 (which is, as far as I'm aware, the latest version available non-Google Experience devices at the moment).



  • Reply 18 of 35
    blastdoorblastdoor Posts: 1,884member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by RichL View Post


    Care to name a few examples?



    Every Android smartphone from a major manufacturer that I can name has either had its software upgraded at least once since shipping or is running 1.6 (which is, as far as I'm aware, the latest version available non-Google Experience devices at the moment).



    This is the problem with some AppleInsider articles (and the problem appears greatest with two particular authors) -- factish sounding assertions that are either completely untrue or are really just speculation. I generally like this site, but this tendency towards dishonesty does not help me as a reader.
  • Reply 19 of 35
    abster2coreabster2core Posts: 2,501member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by RichL View Post


    Care to name a few examples?



    Every Android smartphone from a major manufacturer that I can name has either had its software upgraded at least once since shipping or is running 1.6 (which is, as far as I'm aware, the latest version available non-Google Experience devices at the moment).



    Unfortunately, not everyone is so cognizant.



    Quote:

    ?The larger the company is and larger the installed base of phones, the more time it takes to get out those updates,?And nine of out 10 times, when the company has to make a decision on whether they are going to update the firmware or not, they will say they won?t do it because people already have their product.?



    http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2010/...ion-confusion/



  • Reply 20 of 35
    caljomaccaljomac Posts: 122member
    Well....it's completely unlikely for apple to manipulate markets.....
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