Another leak from Vietnam reveals Apple's 13-inch MacBook refresh

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 167
    chiachia Posts: 710member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by justflybob View Post


    Wow. You're going to fit in here really well.



    Better yet: You can tune a piano, but you cannot Tuna Fish.



    What was that saying about sarcasm and humour again?



    Well it just haddock be you to bring in the fish joke
  • Reply 42 of 167
    sippincidersippincider Posts: 410member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bloggerblog View Post


    Vietnam again?!!!

    Boys, we're movin in...



    Apple has ties with the US government, no?



    Apple's already demonstrated their restraint (or lack of) for kicking down journalists' doors.

    I'm surprised forces haven't paid this journalist a friendly visit as well.
  • Reply 43 of 167
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sflocal View Post


    As an AAPL owner, I'm concerned about the leaks that are coming out.



    Leaks?



    Or just an example of how much spying Vietnam is doing on their neighbors.
  • Reply 44 of 167
    spotonspoton Posts: 645member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by technohermit View Post


    Roadmaps are important for business reasons. If Apple wants to enter into the corporate world, they definitely need to ease up on the secrecy.





    Apple, under Steve Jobs, no longer cares about the corporate market. They are a consumer products company.



    The corporate market has too many demands for labor intensive, specialized hardware specs and according to Phil Schiller, the consumer market is more than 50% of the total market and Apple can stamp out virtually the same hardware for everyone to use equally, saving money.



    Also they can include hardware by default, ensuring a margin on those components as well.



    Think about it, if you were running a company would you rather have the 50% market buying whatever you made with little changes, or the other 50% of cheap corporate customers who want computers with no hard drives, DVD drives, no memory, keyboards or mice and then expect you to support them when they install shoddy third party hardware and software in those computers and shredding those thin margins?



    Apple will of course take corporate orders for their hardware, but don´t expect them to make drastic changes to meet the needs of that market except in special circumstances, like the Virginia Tech ¨Big Mac¨ or the Army´s ¨System 10¨.
  • Reply 45 of 167
    rbonnerrbonner Posts: 635member
    It's interesting that the leaks are coming in video form now.



    Also, I have not purchased a macbook in some time, do they come in that protective bag? I thought part of opening the box was seeing the unit when you opened it up with a protective plastic on the top. This is the only thing that seems fake to me.
  • Reply 46 of 167
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,666member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by technohermit View Post


    Roadmaps are important for business reasons. If Apple wants to enter into the corporate world, they definitely need to ease up on the secrecy.



    I am not sure Apple are desperate to enter into the corporate world in the same way Dell and others are in the corporate world. Nonetheless, roadmaps are important but the value Apple gets from its secrecy and consequently the rumor mill fervor I suspect is worth many many millions of dollars and so it is not a straight forward thing.



    Personally I love the rumors and speculation but I find the whole experience cheapened by leaks such as this one and the iPhone one. Mind you, this leak is hardly worth anything as far as buzz is concerned. Just another spec improving iteration.
  • Reply 47 of 167
    macnycmacnyc Posts: 342member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by harleighquinn View Post


    More than likely he knows this because he is either an IT admistrator or a director of Technology, or a COO of a corporation.....and you have just shown how old you actually are by even asking that question.



    Go play WOW and let the adults discuss real life.



    I'm sorry but I agree with him. Apple has $40 billion in the bank because they know what they are doing.



    You have no clue whether the guy works in IT or not. Anyway that's irrelevant.



    I defer to Steve Jobs as to knowing what makes the most sense for Apple, not some "maybe" IT guy.
  • Reply 48 of 167
    robin huberrobin huber Posts: 3,457member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ChiA View Post


    You've made six times as many posts as I have on Appleinsider yet I knew that all I needed to answer your question was to refer to Appleinsider's earlier reviews.



    I'm the relative newcomer yet the new student is educating the teacher.



    As for chiding, I was stating the fact- something that I found out for you in twenty seconds.

    I helpfully informed you where to find the answer and I hope it's no longer beyond your ability to do your own research.



    I commend you for asking for help but the best help we can give others is that which helps them to help themselves!



    Give someone a fish versus teaching them to fish etc...



    Homework for student: since you enjoy research, look up "gratuitous," "passive aggressive," and "presumptuous."
  • Reply 49 of 167
    markkmarkk Posts: 13member
    need a leak of the next ipod touch to help me decide between an ipad or waiting
  • Reply 50 of 167
    robin huberrobin huber Posts: 3,457member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by macnyc View Post


    I'm sorry but I agree with him. Apple has $40 billion in the bank because they know what they are doing.



    You have no clue whether the guy works in IT or not. Anyway that's irrelevant.



    I defer to Steve Jobs as to knowing what makes the most sense for Apple, not some "maybe" IT guy.



    Me too. Besides, "roadmaps" may be essential for corps like Intel who create products that don't stand on their own, but must be included in the products of others. Apple's products stand on their own. Businesses who buy phones use them as an adjunct to their main business, not a part in their product.
  • Reply 51 of 167
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by macnyc View Post


    I'm sorry but I agree with him. Apple has $40 billion in the bank because they know what they are doing.



    You have no clue whether the guy works in IT or not. Anyway that's irrelevant.



    I defer to Steve Jobs as to knowing what makes the most sense for Apple, not some "maybe" IT guy.



    But as chief accountant for an IT firm I DO have a clue on the mentality.



    As for Apple not caring about the corporate sector, then why the foray into enterprise services?



    ....if only some people thought before speaking.....



    The last few keynotes have been specifically highlighting their support for enterprise.
  • Reply 52 of 167
    charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,217member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sflocal View Post


    As an AAPL owner, I'm concerned about the leaks that are coming out.



    I wouldn't be too worried. there are several points noted that call into question whether the iphone was real

    and this laptop is totally fake. he blanked out the part number, which would have actually validated that it was a new item and left the model number which confirms that it's the Fall 2009 version.
  • Reply 53 of 167
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by robin huber View Post


    homework for student: Since you enjoy research, look up "gratuitous," "passive aggressive," and "presumptuous."



    +1...
  • Reply 54 of 167
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,478moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleGreen View Post


    A Mac mini with 2.4Ghz processor, 4GB, and Nvidia 320M, at the current price point of $599 would be great.



    It would be great at $499 but it's decent at $599. I would doubt a Mini update will come along with the Macbook, though it may have done so in the past. The entry iMac needs to go to the 320M too so I reckon the Mini will tag along with it. If all 3 updates were to arrive soon, that would be nice as updates usually are when they eventually arrive.
  • Reply 55 of 167
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by technohermit View Post


    Roadmaps are important for business reasons. If Apple wants to enter into the corporate world, they definitely need to ease up on the secrecy.



    I'm not denying that some corporations end up with wet panties over road maps. The problem is you can't rely on those road maps in a rapidly changing technology. I'm sure companies like Compaq, Data General, DEC, Prime, Commodore, the S100 community, Heathkit, and many others all had plans, roadmaps and a twinkle in their eyes, but such does the user no good when the company is gone.



    In the end roadmaps are only security blankets for companies that don't understand market dynamics. Lets face it Dell could be gone tomorrow along with any number of other computer companies. As long as new tech can be leveraged to compete against old you will have a turn over as to whom is king of the hill.





    Dave
  • Reply 56 of 167
    dcj001dcj001 Posts: 301member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by LtKaffee View Post


    How is it that the refresh "gives" the Macbook an LED-backlit screen if it already had one? Also, what is a 2.$ GHz processor?



    Does anyone proofread these articles?



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by doyourownthing View Post


    thanks...i was going to write that as well



    very strange article



    It is a 2.4 GHz processor while pressing the Shift key when the 4 is pressed.



    Does anyone think about answering a question before asking the question to everyone else??
  • Reply 57 of 167
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpotOn View Post


    Apple, under Steve Jobs, no longer cares about the corporate market. They are a consumer products company.



    The corporate market has too many demands for labor intensive, specialized hardware specs and according to Phil Schiller, the consumer market is more than 50% of the total market and Apple can stamp out virtually the same hardware for everyone to use equally, saving money.



    Also they can include hardware by default, ensuring a margin on those components as well.



    Think about it, if you were running a company would you rather have the 50% market buying whatever you made with little changes, or the other 50% of cheap corporate customers who want computers with no hard drives, DVD drives, no memory, keyboards or mice and then expect you to support them when they install shoddy third party hardware and software in those computers and shredding those thin margins?



    Apple will of course take corporate orders for their hardware, but don´t expect them to make drastic changes to meet the needs of that market except in special circumstances, like the Virginia Tech ¨Big Mac¨ or the Army´s ¨System 10¨.



    In my business I target everyone that I can, regardless of commercial or residential. Money goes to money, as they say.



    While you make good points, the bulk of corporations like Dell do not support certain equipment in an SLA if it is running third party hardware, much like Apple would do as well. Not saying all third party hardware, but some. (RAM comes to mind as once a non-supported addition, but I think those days are all but gone.)



    Apple does, however, stand to make a great deal on corporate SLAs, especially given the fact that they do both hardware and software. It's not just about who makes what, but who supports it. This is the shortfall of not knowing where Apple is going, and back to my original point.
  • Reply 58 of 167
    jetlawjetlaw Posts: 156member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by macnyc

    I'm sorry but I agree with him. Apple has $40 billion in the bank because they know what they are doing.



    You have no clue whether the guy works in IT or not. Anyway that's irrelevant.



    I defer to Steve Jobs as to knowing what makes the most sense for Apple, not some "maybe" IT guy



    .



    The original person who made this comment never suggested that Apple didn't know what they were doing, only that Apple has chosen a business strategy that is designed to to maximize revenue from the consumer market, potentially at the expense of the corporate market.
  • Reply 59 of 167
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ChiA View Post


    You've made six times as many posts as I have on Appleinsider yet I knew that all I needed to answer your question was to refer to Appleinsider's earlier reviews.



    I'm the relative newcomer yet the new student is educating the teacher.



    As for chiding, I was stating the fact- something that I found out for you in twenty seconds.

    I helpfully informed you where to find the answer and I hope it's no longer beyond your ability to do your own research.



    I commend you for asking for help but the best help we can give others is that which helps them to help themselves!



    Give someone a fish versus teaching them to fish etc...



    Teaching someone to fish is different than acting like a jerk.



    Physician heal thyself
  • Reply 60 of 167
    isaidsoisaidso Posts: 750member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by technohermit View Post


    Roadmaps are important for business reasons. If Apple wants to enter into the corporate world, they definitely need to ease up on the secrecy.



    Bus. tech roadmaps and Apple's marketing "style" of secrecy have nothing to do with one another. Apple's secrecy has been part and parcel of it's growth (ie, it has only helped the company; not hurt it) Further; it is common knowledge that Apple's primary focus is not on "business". (though that has certainly not stopped many businesses from adopting or integrating Apple technologies).



    As to Apple's own roadmaps (where it would be of interest to IT); that's one of the reasons why Apple has WWDC.
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