Hackers release 'jailbreak' of iOS 4 for Apple's iPhone 3GS

1234579

Comments

  • Reply 121 of 180
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hezetation View Post


    There is, it's called Android. I love how everyone singles out app theft. Guilty by association eh?



    I don't like Android OS nor the phones it is for. You were the first person to single out app theft as the "prime reason" people jailbreak, I don't get why you're trying to make it sound like I singled it out in my post which was a response to your claims.
  • Reply 122 of 180
    cmf2cmf2 Posts: 1,427member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hezetation View Post


    It's pretty clear I believe the greatest motivation for hacking the iPhone was to gain unauthorized apps (including theft of legit apps) or to tether illegally. It's pretty clear I believe that is the greatest motivation behind it.



    Can I be any more clear? Should I write an essay on the matter?



    Actually you said it was the only reason. You're only changing your tune because you've been proven wrong and you're trying to save face. Pirated apps could be a major motivating factor for many, perhaps even a majority of jailbreakers, but lumping everyone together is doing many many people a major disservice.



    Ignorance like yours is what allows corporations to slowly erode away our consumer rights. Apparently everything they do is okay as long as they are doing it to fight those dirty pirates, which of course includes all jailbreakers. Canada has a bill in legislature that would make it illegal to break digital locks, and some people think that's fine because they have the same mindset as you. If this bill passes, I'll think of you every time I break the law by copying one of my purchased DVD's to my computer.
  • Reply 123 of 180
    hezetationhezetation Posts: 674member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by seek3r View Post


    I can't decide if you're trolling or not, but I'll bite.



    My ipod touch is jail broken because I want to be able to compile and run any app I want, without it being vetted by apple first. I want to be able to retain apps that apple has pulled from the app store. I want to be able to run a full dev tool-chain on my ipod if I want to, have full directory access, and full control over *my device*. I want to be able to customize my UI more than apple's anemic built-in abilities. I don't want to get an android device because there are a lot of things I really like about iOS, but I do want to customize it a bit.





    2 other points:



    a) I don't need the warranty as much as I want these features, and you can sure as hell bet there are a lot of others like me!



    but also, b) in respect to , some people also happen to like to hack their devices, make them work in ways they werent marketed to.



    My xbox at home serves as a streaming media center more than as a game console, and it used to function as server before being retired in favor of a mac mini (both btw running debian linux). Back when I lived a college house my beer fridge had temp sensors purloined from a broken imac. The list goes on



    Hacking is fun, mate!



    True, it can be fun, though the few times I've altered a device to open features I was using packaged tools or instructions so I don't consider myself a hacker. I just think as much as it can bring to a device there is much more bad that comes along with it.



    You can hack other devices like an AppleTV or PS3 but in the end most of the reasons you hack them could be done with more elegance on a cheap linux box running something like XBMC or Boxee. The big issue with hacking is the doors it opens and the general abuse of it with a mindset that, "what I'm doing is not really that bad, really."



    People share mp3s all the time without a second thought because the culture has already embraced it as no big deal. Call me a prude but theft is theft and when people hack and then try to justify it with 1 or 2 minor legitimacies while also using it to do things like tether illegally or share apps with friends they are already guilty of stealing.



    I have been guilty of it, and have seen others get ruined by it when they casually walk into a fed trap. Fortunately I've gotten my wake-up call by the misfortune of others, learned my lesson by observation instead of experience. Companies have a right to protect their products, afterall Apple wouldn't make an iPhone if there was no business in it.
  • Reply 124 of 180
    hezetationhezetation Posts: 674member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Masterz1337 View Post


    I don't like Android OS nor the phones it is for. You were the first person to single out app theft as the "prime reason" people jailbreak, I don't get why you're trying to make it sound like I singled it out in my post which was a response to your claims.



    Single it out from tethering, which is also illegal. There are other things jailbreaking ahs been used for as well.



    I didn't single it out, I made a general statement which included it. There is a difference.
  • Reply 125 of 180
    saareksaarek Posts: 1,531member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by IronHeadSlim View Post


    He is a thief.



    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tulkas

    What the fuck, man?!!?

    he pays for tethering, what hell is so hard for you to understand that? He didn't want to pay an extra $100 for the 3G iPad. His plan allows him to use his phone to provide an IP to other devices, not just his laptop and not excluding his iPad. So he jailbreaks so he can use his paid for tethering service to provide an IP to his iPad.



    he isn't a thief. You calling him, especially when it clearly isn't true should rightfully get you an infraction. If not, why not start making unsubstantiated, ignorant, libelous accusations of criminal activity against you?



    Surely this isn't someone else calling me a thief? For goodness sake, I pay for my iPhone contract and on top of that contract I pay a monthly fee to tether said device, as i pay for what I use and incidentally what I use is not even a lot (on average 250-300mb a month) how on earth do people get off calling me a thief?
  • Reply 126 of 180
    macslutmacslut Posts: 514member
    Most, but not all of us are in the U.S. here, but even some of us in the U.S. use our phones internationally.



    Without unlocking your iPhone, you can use it throughout Europe by using a SIM from iPhoneTrip.com. Included in the SIM rental is unlimited data regardless of how you use the data connection. Tethering doesn't break your agreement. There is a weekly cap (It's huge, like 7GB a week or something ridiculously large).



    However, the software on your U.S. iPhone, prior to iOS 4, didn't allow you to tether with the rented SIM unless you jailbroke.



    It's not illegal. It's not theft of service. It's not wrong. Nobody loses. Etc...



    Additionally as others have pointed out, there are MANY reasons left for still wanting to jailbreak in iOS 4. For me SBSettings tops the list. Customizations is a close second. General tweaks and hacks, etc...



    As far as piracy, it should be noted that Cydia does have commercial apps in it now, and some of them are quite good.



    I find it funny that people here are using Macs to pass judgment on jailbreakers as being thieves and pirates. Turn that back on yourselves and ask yourself why you're using Macs...is it just to be thieves and pirates? Doesn't iOS 4 provide you with everything you want legally as is?
  • Reply 127 of 180
    cmf2cmf2 Posts: 1,427member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hezetation View Post


    Single it out from tethering, which is also illegal. There are other things jailbreaking ahs been used for as well.



    I didn't single it out, I made a general statement which included it. There is a difference.



    Mind backing up your statement that tethering is illegal? With the appropriate clauses from the contract or service agreement, along with proof that those are legally binding?



    Even if it is illegal, it shouldn't be. Laws are only laws because they are supported by the population (in theory) and enforced by the government. I'd like to know why you feel AT&T should have the right to tell you what you can do with your limited data.
  • Reply 128 of 180
    hezetationhezetation Posts: 674member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cmf2 View Post


    Actually you said it was the only reason. You're only changing your tune because you've been proven wrong and you're trying to save face. Pirated apps could be a major motivating factor for many, perhaps even a majority of jailbreakers, but lumping everyone together is doing many many people a major disservice.



    Ignorance like yours is what allows corporations to slowly erode away our consumer rights. Apparently everything they do is okay as long as they are doing it to fight those dirty pirates, which of course includes all jailbreakers. Canada has a bill in legislature that would make it illegal to break digital locks, and some people think that's fine because they have the same mindset as you. If this bill passes, I'll think of you every time I break the law by copying one of my purchased DVD's to my computer.



    My original statement:

    Geesh, so now that there is multitasking I wonder what their excuse is now. Once tethering is official then there will be no masking their agenda to steal software and services.



    Some people work hard for what they get, others work hard to steal from those people.





    Yup, only isn't in there.



    Again with ignorance, so everyone who disagrees with your view must be ignorant. Oh wait, know what, I'm not going to put words in your mouth like others like to do.



    Companies are entities run by people. People like to pretend they are mindless machines that can only be defeated with regulation but that is not true. Companies are very fluid and respond much better to consumer purchase power than they do to pointless regulation.



    Most companies, including Apple, like to know they are making the world a better place. Whatever their shortfalls they aren't all just a bunch of money grubbing evildoers trying to crush all who get in their way. This is proven over and over in boycotts, where even a small number of deserters from a name brand gets big recognition from those at the top. They live in fear of customer revolt because without us they don't make money!



    By the way, when stuff is pirated it isn't the CEOs who lose money, they just take it out elsewhere (like the salary of the developers). Steve Jobs sees the same pay at the end of the day whether you nab apps illegally or not, so by going after people they are protecting the developers more than anyone else.



    It's up to the citizens of Canada to decide what laws are passed in their land, and if they choose to oppress themselves that is their choice. I don't live there so I can't pretend to know anything about the bill you speak of.



    By the way, from what I understand it is the distribution of copied DVDs that can bring about the unlawful part of the warning message they cary. At least in the US I don't think they can prohibit you from making a backup of your DVDs to "protect from damage". If you find a way to walk the line of legality without crossing it then more power to ya. Though sounds like if that Bill passes it will then definitely be illegal to make digital copies of your DVDs.
  • Reply 129 of 180
    Er... Steve Jobs actually does lose money at the end of the day when Apple loses money, you know he only receives a single dollar salary each year. Everything he ears is based on stocks.
  • Reply 130 of 180
    trumptmantrumptman Posts: 16,464member
    For the record you are all thieves. I want the time stolen out of my life to read this thread back now.
  • Reply 131 of 180
    hezetationhezetation Posts: 674member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Masterz1337 View Post


    Er... Steve Jobs actually does lose money at the end of the day when Apple loses money, you know he only receives a single dollar salary each year. Everything he ears is based on stocks.



    Oh yeah, k, he was a bad example.
  • Reply 132 of 180
    hezetationhezetation Posts: 674member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by trumptman View Post


    For the record you are all thieves. I want the time stolen out of my life to read this thread back now.



    Sorry man, I suppose it was pretty much all my fault too.
  • Reply 133 of 180
    cmf2cmf2 Posts: 1,427member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hezetation View Post


    My original statement:

    Geesh, so now that there is multitasking I wonder what their excuse is now. Once tethering is official then there will be no masking their agenda to steal software and services.



    Some people work hard for what they get, others work hard to steal from those people.





    Yup, only isn't in there.



    "No masking" excludes all other possible reasons. It means the same thing. I called you ignorant because your initial post clearly indicated that you saw no ethical reasons to jailbreak. The fact that there are such reasons means you are (or at least were) ignorant of them. Or trolling.
  • Reply 133 of 180
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 3,085member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MWahlman View Post




    The iPhone 3G is my lawful property...



    Ownership has nothing to do with authorized usage.
  • Reply 135 of 180
    aiaddictaiaddict Posts: 487member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hezetation View Post


    Promise I'm not. My first post was perhaps a little boisterous, a bit of a jab at the hackers knowing they would indeed bite. However, digital rights and contractual agreements deserve some lengthy discussion in this world as it seems more and more we care less about either.



    I have jailbroken my phone since day 1, and I have never once broken my carrier contract nor downloaded a single pirated app. Now, since you are Mr. moral and legal, I must isist that you either...



    1) Apologize to me and any other member of the community you grossly mischaracterized, or



    2) Please provide your real name and address so that we can sue you for libelous statements about us.



    I am sure you will understand.
  • Reply 136 of 180
    hezetationhezetation Posts: 674member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cmf2 View Post


    "No masking" excludes all other possible reasons. It means the same thing. I called you ignorant because your initial post clearly indicated that you saw no ethical reasons to jailbreak. The fact that there are such reasons, means you are (or at least were) ignorant of them. Or trolling.



    Well that's only if you prove that "their" literally means anyone and everyone who jailbreaks. I actually already clarified that the comment at the time was directed towards the hackers who created the jailbreak.
  • Reply 137 of 180
    aiaddictaiaddict Posts: 487member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hezetation View Post


    Well that's only if you prove that "their" literally means anyone and everyone who jailbreaks. I actually already clarified that the comment at the time was directed towards the hackers who created the jailbreak.



    Still libelous since the dev-team have been rather outspoken in their opposition to pirating. Why not admit that you mad an inaccurate defamatory statement without basis or provocation and say you are sorry and move on?
  • Reply 138 of 180
    cmf2cmf2 Posts: 1,427member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hezetation View Post


    Well that's only if you prove that "their" literally means anyone and everyone who jailbreaks. I actually already clarified that the comment at the time was directed towards the hackers who created the jailbreak.



    Wouldn't that make you more wrong? I'm pretty sure the challenge and the efame that comes with hacking a popular device has something to do with it, in addition to an above average desire to do more with every electronic device they own. All legitimate uses of jailbreaks would also apply to them. I'm not saying they are top notch individuals, I don't know them, but I guarantee you that piracy and tethering are not the only reasons they create these jailbreaks.



    For the record, you can edit posts if everyone is misinterpreting your intentions behind the post.
  • Reply 139 of 180
    aiaddictaiaddict Posts: 487member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cmf2 View Post


    Wouldn't that make you more wrong?



    If you find yourself in a hole, dig faster!
  • Reply 140 of 180
    seek3rseek3r Posts: 179member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hezetation View Post


    True, it can be fun, though the few times I've altered a device to open features I was using packaged tools or instructions so I don't consider myself a hacker. I just think as much as it can bring to a device there is much more bad that comes along with it.



    Hacking is such a broad thing that your statement is absurd. Hacking really is the act of taking something apart and changing it, or making it function differently than originally intended. Most engineers are hackers, many scientists are too.



    Creating a linking oscillatory gene control, like the "repressilator" (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10659856) is hacking.



    Using PS3s for scientific computation is hacking (http://www.af.mil/information/bios/bio.asp?bioID=7808).



    Exporting a ramdisk over NFS using infiniband, disabling and removing drive controllers, modifying fan layouts for better power usage distribution, and manually changing cpu core allocation is hacking (shamelessly plugging some of my own work here : http://commcgi.cc.stonybrook.edu/am2...petition.shtml)



    You hack things to get more function or specific function out of them, and the fact that some people see it as a negative bothers me. Why do I need to use a device specifically as a vendor intended it to be used? Think Different, dammit!





    Quote:

    You can hack other devices like an AppleTV or PS3 but in the end most of the reasons you hack them could be done with more elegance on a cheap linux box running something like XBMC or Boxee. The big issue with hacking is the doors it opens and the general abuse of it with a mindset that, "what I'm doing is not really that bad, really."



    You can hack *anything* (see above), and it isnt bad, not at all. The view that's been gradually fostered in the US population about modifying their devices being bad is a dangerous one, and one I think threatens US ingenuity in the long run. Using a hacked, or unhacked, device for illegal or immoral purposes may be bad, but the hacking is not.



    Quote:

    People share mp3s all the time without a second thought because the culture has already embraced it as no big deal. Call me a prude but theft is theft and when people hack and then try to justify it with 1 or 2 minor legitimacies while also using it to do things like tether illegally or share apps with friends they are already guilty of stealing.



    What does sharing MP3s have to do with hacking? That's copyright violation, and not related to hacking except tangentially.



    Quote:

    I have been guilty of it, and have seen others get ruined by it when they casually walk into a fed trap. Fortunately I've gotten my wake-up call by the misfortune of others, learned my lesson by observation instead of experience. Companies have a right to protect their products, afterall Apple wouldn't make an iPhone if there was no business in it.



    Consumer rights are very important too, something that seems to be getting further and further lost these days...
Sign In or Register to comment.