Millions of Android users hit by malicious data theft app

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 216
    gwydiongwydion Posts: 1,083member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by davesw View Post


    well we (iPhone owners) wouldn't know. ask DaHarder



    I though you wouldn't know.



    By the way, with those permissions an app can't read most of the thing the reports says.
  • Reply 42 of 216
    daveswdavesw Posts: 406member
    Be safe. Use an iPhone.
  • Reply 43 of 216
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    It?s interesting, for the past decade we?ve been hearing that Macs don?t get viruses because their marketshare is too small to be a concern.



    Yet, Macs had viruses well before Mac OS X was introduced, back when they sold a lot less units and had even less marketshare. That doesn?t consider the fact that Mac sales are about double that of the average PC sale which indicates that Mac users may be a better target for thieves due to more disposable income to access.



    This completely shatters that pejorative security through obscurity mantra that since Android has less marketshare than iOS devices.



    Well, at least Norton has a chance to make some money on smartphones now.





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mike Fix View Post


    This can/will happen to the iPhone one day. It's inevitable. But I do like the fact that there's a company doing their best to prevent such a thing from happening.



    Sure, anything can happen. There are exploits in code and brilliant though unethical coders that find other ingenious ways to circumvent security, but Apple did conceive and implement a foundation that makes this harder.
  • Reply 44 of 216
    "When theres no limit to what Droid gets, theres no limit to what Droid does"



    enough said. lol
  • Reply 45 of 216
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Chopper View Post


    The schadenfreude being expressed here may well haunt a few posters in the future ...



    Let's be careful out there.



    True enough.
  • Reply 46 of 216
    daveswdavesw Posts: 406member
    The android os, the entire android market, and the whole android philosophy Are All By Design insecure.
  • Reply 47 of 216
    firefly7475firefly7475 Posts: 1,502member
    Hmmm... Using fear to justify draconian control and censorship... I wonder if that has ever been used in the past...



  • Reply 48 of 216
    daveswdavesw Posts: 406member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Firefly7475 View Post


    Hmmm... Using fear to justify draconian control and censorship... I wonder if that has ever been used in the past...







    Have fun with your spyware and leave us alone.
  • Reply 49 of 216
    povilaspovilas Posts: 473member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Firefly7475 View Post


    Hmmm... Using fear to justify draconian control and censorship... I wonder if that has ever been used in the past...







    Yep it's better just to leave users alone in the dark like google does and call it open market, open source and so on? What are you smoking?
  • Reply 50 of 216
    matrix07matrix07 Posts: 1,993member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post


    Love to see the fandroids response to this...



    It's overblown.
  • Reply 51 of 216
    gwydiongwydion Posts: 1,083member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by davesw View Post


    The android os, the entire android market, and the whole android philosophy Are All By Design insecure.



    Why? Any argument for that?
  • Reply 52 of 216
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by matrix07 View Post


    It's overblown.



    How do you say that is Mandarin?





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gwydion View Post


    Why? Any argument for that?



    Here?s an argument that backs up his point.
  • Reply 53 of 216
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 6,083member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nvidia2008 View Post


    Love to see the fandroids response to this...



    "They were just using it wrong..."



    Sorry... I just couldn't help it!
  • Reply 54 of 216
    gristangristan Posts: 25member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DaHarder View Post


    No issues with the 3 Android phones and two Android tablets in my home, but the spouse's iPhone 4 appears to be dropping calls a bit more than usual today (as indicated by her angrily exclaiming as much upon walking through the door this evening), and the old iPhone 3g didn't take too kindly to that last firmware update.



    Oh Well... I guess we're just Android-Lucky















    EVEN HERE IN JAPAN, ANDROID Apps Store ARE NOTRIOUS FOR



    " FULL OF TRASHES, JUNKIES AND ILLEGAL COPY THINGS "!!!!!!!!!!!!!



    EVEN THAT GIZMODO JAPAN POINTED OUT AND WARNED THE SITUATION JUST A MONTH AGO!!!!!!!!!
  • Reply 55 of 216
    gwydiongwydion Posts: 1,083member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    Here?s an argument that backs up his point.



    No, this thread proves nothing, mainly because is full of wrong facts. An app with that permission can't read any personal data (SMS's, bookmarks, history, voice mail passwords, etc)
  • Reply 56 of 216
    firefly7475firefly7475 Posts: 1,502member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by davesw View Post


    Have fun with your spyware and leave us alone.



    But I've got the one with the Gee Bees!
  • Reply 57 of 216
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gwydion View Post


    No, this thread proves nothing, mainly because is full of wrong facts. An app with that permission can't read any personal data (SMS's, bookmarks, history, voice mail passwords, etc)



    You don?t consider SMS messages you?ve written, bookmarks you?ve saved, history of your browser, or the actual password to access your private voicemail messages as personal? I certainly do. What if your VM password, usually a PIN number, isn?t also the same as your ATM PIN number?
  • Reply 58 of 216
    gwydiongwydion Posts: 1,083member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    You don?t consider SMS messages you?ve written, bookmarks you?ve saved, history of your browser, or the actual password to access your private voicemail messages as personal? I certainly do. What if your VM password, usually a PIN number, isn?t also the same as your ATM PIN number?



    No, I consider this personal and important data. But this data CAN'T BE READ with the permissions that this app has.
  • Reply 59 of 216
    shadashshadash Posts: 470member
    Well, I hate to agree with you, but there is no upside for Android on this one. Google needs to take a more hands-on approach to vetting apps. But since they are making nothing on the software or hardware, they have no incentive to do what Apple does, which sounds like a huge headache.



    Microsoft has apparently adopted an Apple-like approach to their app store for WM7. It will be interesting to see if WM7 displaces Android over time if problems like this continue. MS could carve out a niche in which they are less restrictive than Apple (Google Voice, more carriers than just asstastic AT&T, etc.) but curate their app store to a much greater extent than Google. It will be interesting to watch how this plays out.





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    I?m looking forward to the counterargument. I can?t think of a single angle that is pro-Android on this one.







    It is amazing that one modern mobile OS gets denigrate for even the simplest slip up and the other modern mobile OS can make huge errors in design that are well known to fail and barely anyone will ever know it existed despite the number of people it affects.



  • Reply 60 of 216
    chopperchopper Posts: 246member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gwydion View Post


    No, I consider this personal and important data. But this data CAN'T BE READ with the permissions that this app has.



    So you're saying, obviously, that the people who reported the app as sending this sensitive data to somebody in China are making it up. Lying, in fact. Interesting, but surprising that nobody at the black hat conference called them on it.



    Unless the report was bogus and the security guys never claimed the wallpaper app actually did what's been attributed to it.



    What makes you certain that the app cannot access the data claimed? Not that I'm doubting your knowledge - but thus far you're the only voice stating that position. And excuse my ignorance, Android is foreign to my experience.
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