Corporate IT departments relax rules to allow Apple's iPad

Posted:
in iPad edited January 2014
Because it is based on the established iOS mobile operating system -- and because it is relatively cheap and increases productivity -- the iPad has found uncharacteristically quick approval from many information-technology managers at U.S. corporations.



Highlighting the success of the iPad in the business world, The Wall Street Journal on Tuesday noted that while many companies would not approve the iPhone for corporate use when it debuted in 2007, the iPad has quickly found acceptance with IT departments at companies. Part of that is because the iOS mobile operating system, previously only available for the iPhone and iPod touch, has been updated with business-friendly features such as Exchange e-mail and remote erase capabilities.



"Apple has addressed these and other issues, including the ability for companies to encrypt information on iPhones and set up secure ways for employees to connect to corporate networks," author Ben Worthen wrote. "The latest version of the operating system used by the iPhone and iPad adds features that make the devices easier for a tech department to manage, including the ability for businesses to distribute internally developed apps without going through Apple's App Store."



The report noted that more than 500 of the more than 11,000 applications currently available for the iPad are business-oriented. One free application from Citrix, which allows employees to access corporate programs on the iPad, has seen more than 145,000 downloads.



Other advantages to the iPad: its $499 starting price makes it less expensive than a traditional business laptop, and more functional for activities like working standing up or giving a presentation.



The paper recalled that Mercedes-Benz dealers have been equipping employees with iPads to help them sell cars. The car maker began using the iPad at 40 dealerships in May, and earlier this summer said it was considering using the iPad at all 350 of its U.S. locations.



Other specific corporate uses of the iPad mentioned in the Journal's report include:



Baush & Lomb Inc., maker of eye-care products, had about 50 employees using an iPad soon after its launch. The company built its own application for salespeople. The company likes the fact that the device starts quickly and has a long battery life.



Kaiser Permanente, an Oakland, Calif., health-care organization, has been testing the iPad in a 37,000-square-foot technology lab for viewing medical images such as X-rays and CT scans.



Though Chicago law firm Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal LLP banned the iPhone when it first came out, it preordered 10 iPads before it was released. The company now has more than 50 attorneys equipped with iPads, and plans to issue them as an alternative to laptops next year.

Earlier this summer, Apple revealed that the iPad is at use in more than 50 percent of Fortune 100 companies. Companies such as SAP and Wells Fargo
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 77
    See! The iPad is so completely useless for productivity.

    Nobody want's it, nobody can find a purpose for it. it's piling up in the stores.

    Apple is going down.
  • Reply 2 of 77
    crees!crees! Posts: 501member
    I can tell you that the largest defense contractor in the U.S. has not approved the iPad for connecting to the company intranet and won't have a policy in place until sometime next year.
  • Reply 3 of 77
    This is merely a fluke. People will see how useless the iPad is once all of the iPad killers come out and take over Apple's stranglehold on the tablet market.



    </sarcasm>
  • Reply 4 of 77
    shobizshobiz Posts: 207member
    For one strategic partner it still requires 5th level approval to even think about getting one. That is after you get a boards approval first...

    Even then you better be one of the good ole boys to get one.
  • Reply 5 of 77
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ElmCityWeb View Post


    This is merely a fluke. People will see how useless the iPad is once all of the iPad killers come out and take over Apple's stranglehold on the tablet market.



    </sarcasm>



    Will the iPad killers strike at night, when everybody is asleep?

    Do I have to be afraid for my iPad??? Should I take preventive actions????

    I am so scared!



    BEWARE OF THE iPAD KILLER
  • Reply 6 of 77
    The only reason, and I mean only reason any IT department would allow an IPAD on the network would be because some gadget happy executives mandated it.
  • Reply 7 of 77
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by rockridder;


    The only reason, and I mean only reason any IT department would allow an IPAD on the network would be because some gadget happy executives mandated it.



    I know! How can anybody use this thing? I mean, it doesn't make me coffee, so how can it be productive in a business environment? I respect your deductions on the matter, do you have a newsletter I can subscribe to?
  • Reply 8 of 77
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,141member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by crees! View Post


    I can tell you that the largest defense contractor in the U.S. has not approved the iPad for connecting to the company intranet and won't have a policy in place until sometime next year.



    Any idea what OS they use on their computers ...?
  • Reply 9 of 77
    It needs a full OSX.

    No flash. Internet is crippled.

    No OLED, front-face camera, HDMI, SD Card slot, multitasking.

    You can't put it in your pocket.

    You can't make calls on it.

    It just a big iPod touch.

    iPad is a failure, barely sell a million.

    It will be the next Newton.

    Apple is doomed?



    ..etc etc.
  • Reply 10 of 77
    aaarrrggghaaarrrgggh Posts: 1,572member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by crees! View Post


    I can tell you that the largest defense contractor in the U.S. has not approved the iPad for connecting to the company intranet and won't have a policy in place until sometime next year.



    Of course not; you can't access classified data from WiFi. You cant even have wifi enabled devices on during classified activities.



    You will see some administrative and possibly unclassified applications before too long though, as long as the lines aren't blurred.
  • Reply 11 of 77
    I know some of the IC security folks and they are not risk takers, if it is not written with invisible ink on invisible paper it is not secure

    Wireless and secure are not 2 words they would ever put together. I remember them having a fit over IP addressing and still pushing point to point connections



    PS: "you want to bring in a cell phone with a camera in it!!!"
  • Reply 12 of 77
    pmmkpmmk Posts: 1member
    "relatively inexpensive" ? I can go get a mini laptop that actually does Flash, has a keyboard, a USB port and a webcam for half. And it's already supported by IT departments.



    It's not compact, it's not quick to type on, it's overpriced for what it is.
  • Reply 13 of 77
    I'm not sure I understand how the rules are any different from the ones for an iPhone?
  • Reply 14 of 77
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by pmmk View Post


    "relatively inexpensive" ? I can go get a mini laptop that actually does Flash, has a keyboard, a USB port and a webcam for half. And it's already supported by IT departments.



    It's not compact, it's not quick to type on, it's overpriced for what it is.



    The trolls are sure coming out of the woodwork. Two "one" posters for this story so far.



    It must really hurt some people to see the iPad's success.



    ** on edit: Make that three "one" posters and counting... **
  • Reply 15 of 77
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by rockridder View Post


    The only reason, and I mean only reason any IT department would allow an IPAD on the network would be because some gadget happy executives mandated it.



    If IT department allows Blackberry and Windows Mobile devices and I assume the iPhone what would be the rational for now allowing the iPad? Or are you thinking that the bigger screen somehow makes the device less secure?
  • Reply 16 of 77
    It is amazing how articles like this come out without the mention about perks in the workplace. I will now go on to make a statement that will make all other IT professionals shake in their boots. I guess I am like the masked magician but for IT. If it's a toy and it's electronic and if it?s new and cool, we will find a way or make a way for items like this to work. I can tell you that most VPs and CEOs demand their toys, and they are always asking me how we as IT professionals can make it happen. When the new iphone came out I was told I had to find a reason for our COO to get rid of his old 3Gs so he could have the latest and greatest. Most accountants need a reason and we always get stuck with the bag. Just because a couple of high priced lawyers ordered iPads doesn't mean that they make good sense in the workplace. Is the iPad a great toy, heck yes! Is it a great tool in the workplace, not really.
  • Reply 17 of 77
    benicebenice Posts: 382member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by aaarrrgggh View Post


    Of course not; you can't access classified data from WiFi. You cant even have wifi enabled devices on during classified activities.



    You will see some administrative and possibly unclassified applications before too long though, as long as the lines aren't blurred.



    This is still one of the big things which Blackberry really has over it's competitors. Not so much Wi-Fi but when it comes to data security over phone networks there is real trust in their encryption technology that iPads and iPhones do not and probably will not have.
  • Reply 18 of 77
    nhtnht Posts: 4,429member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by aaarrrgggh View Post


    Of course not; you can't access classified data from WiFi. You cant even have wifi enabled devices on during classified activities.



    You will see some administrative and possibly unclassified applications before too long though, as long as the lines aren't blurred.



    Corporate intranets aren't classified.

    You can use wireless on classified networks. It's just expensive and a pain in the ass.

    The iPad could have wireless disabled and dock to get information updates. Whether a software lockout is sufficient, I dunno.
  • Reply 19 of 77
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by andalou View Post


    It is amazing how articles like this come out without the mention about perks in the workplace. I will now go on to make a statement that will make all other IT professionals shake in their boots. I guess I am like the masked magician but for IT. If it's a toy and it's electronic and if it?s new and cool, we will find a way or make a way for items like this to work. I can tell you that most VPs and CEOs demand their toys, and they are always asking me how we as IT professionals can make it happen. When the new iphone came out I was told I had to find a reason for our COO to get rid of his old 3Gs so he could have the latest and greatest. Most accountants need a reason and we always get stuck with the bag. Just because a couple of high priced lawyers ordered iPads doesn't mean that they make good sense in the workplace. Is the iPad a great toy, heck yes! Is it a great tool in the workplace, not really.



    Shorter andalou:



    "If I can't be productive with it, no one else can. Because everyone works exactly like me and has exactly the same needs as me".
  • Reply 20 of 77
    pmmk … and then go to this site and read the poem http://holyjoe.org/poetry/foss3.htm
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