Rivals and partners comment on Apple's recent moves.

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
Google, Intel and Acer have commented on Apple recently, with comments ranging from praise for its revised App Store policies, to criticism from the co-founder of Acer, which called Apple's products "mutant viruses."



Google



Google Vice President of Product Management Omar Hamoui posted the comments on the Mobile Ads Blog, praising Apple's changes to its iOS Developer Program license. According to Hamoui, "these new terms ensure that Apple's developers have the choice of a variety of advertising solutions (including Google's and AdMob's)."



"This is great news for everyone in the community, as we believe that a competitive environment is the best way to drive innovation and growth in mobile advertising" wrote Hamoui.



Google is "pleased that Apple clarified its terms," continued Hamoui, "We're 100% committed to developing the best possible advertising solutions and formats for the iPhone - as well as for Android devices, BlackBerry devices, Palm devices, Windows mobile devices."



In April, Apple modified the terms of its mobile OS developer agreement to prevent outside advertising agencies from collecting user data. According to Apple CEO Steve Jobs, the changes were made to protect user privacy. The restriction was relaxed in June, but a clause was added that seemed to single out Google and its recent acquisition AdMob.



According to the developer agreement, "an independent advertising service provider whose primary business is serving mobile ads" would be allowed to collect user or device data. However, "an advertising service or provider owned or affiliated with a developer or distributor of mobile devices, mobile operating systems of development environments other than Apple would not qualify as independent."



Although Apple never actually blocked Google or AdMob, some developers were hesitant to implement their ad networks. Scott Dunlap, the chief executive of NearbyNow Inc., told the Wall Street Journal, "We stayed away from adding anything other than the iAd network."



Intel



In an interview with the Journal, Intel CEO Paul Otellini criticized the recently announced Apple TV, saying Jobs took a "step backward" with it. Intel is partnering with Google to launch a rival set top box platform, Google TV, which will begin shipping this month with units from Sony and Logitech.



Otellini promoted Google TV as having the "full internet," unlike Apple TV. He sees Apple TV as appealing to his mom because of its simplicity, while Google TV would appeal to his son.



When questioned about the growing popularity of the iPad, Otellini remarked that the industry would not "let Apple run away with this one."



Although Intel provide chips for all of Apple's Macs, the company has steadily lost ground in non-PC markets. The Apple TV, which used to use an Intel processor, now sports the same custom-built A4 ARM-based processor as the iPad, iPhone 4 and fourth-generation iPod touch.



In August, Intel bought the wireless unit of iPhone chipmaker Infineon for $1.4 billion as part of a play to regain lost ground in the wireless space. Infineon makes the baseband chip for the iPhone.



Acer



Acer founder Stan Shih in an interview compared Apple's products to "mutant viruses" which are hard to cure in the short-term. According to the Digitimes report, Shih believes that "PC vendors will eventually find a way to isolate Apple and become immune."



Shih admits that Apple deserves to be respected, but sees Apple's "closed" strategy as weaker in the longer-term than that of other PC brands. Drawing comparisons to the Windows versus Mac and Betamax versus VHS showdowns, Shih believes "open" eventually wins.



Apple's "culture of innovation" can be learned from, though, according to Shih. He believes Taiwan's industry focuses too much on hardware and should instead incorporate Apple-like creativity to go after the nascent Chinese market.



In August, Acer chairman JT Wang predicted that the market share of the iPad will drop from 100 percent to between 20 to 30 percent.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 89
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post




    He sees Apple TV as appealing to his mom because of its simplicity, while Google TV would appeal to his son.




    Very interesting quote. Apple does indeed seem to be wooing unsophisticated technophobes with their newest products.



    Will that strategy work in the long term, with a generation who used computers before they could read? Do they want simplicity or capability?
  • Reply 2 of 89
    aplnubaplnub Posts: 2,605member
    Intel needs to develop an A4 equivalent and get over the sour apples. If they don't shut the pie hole they may loose the business that is Mac to AMD.



    Acer is just out there. What a weird company PR team they have. Market share does not mean profitability.
  • Reply 3 of 89
    wow these boys are mad
  • Reply 4 of 89
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,447member
    Shih is full of Shit!







    <I just couldn't resist>



    Sorry
  • Reply 5 of 89
    rokradrokrad Posts: 143member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    He sees Apple TV as appealing to his mom because of its simplicity, while Google TV would appeal to his son.





    Hahah what teenager in their right mind would use the internet on such a big screen in front of everyone? hahaha
  • Reply 6 of 89
    nagrommenagromme Posts: 2,834member
    If “open” (meaning Acer + Windows??) always wins, then I take it that Linux defeated Microsoft and Apple alike?



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Newtron View Post


    Very interesting quote. Apple does indeed seem to be wooing unsophisticated technophobes with their newest products.



    Will that strategy work in the long term, with a generation who used computers before they could read? Do they want simplicity or capability?



    Look at cars: we all grew up with cars, but few of us need the “capability” to mod every aspect ourselves. People want the capability of what the thing will actually do for them.



    Ease of use will win over obscure customizations... and Apple will keep delivering on the capability front too
  • Reply 7 of 89
    Haters'll say and do haterlike shit. Can't be mad at that.
  • Reply 8 of 89
    kibitzerkibitzer Posts: 1,114member
    Can't you just feel the love?! One would have expected better from the executives at such major competitors. The quality of their sniping is somewhat pathetic.
  • Reply 9 of 89
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rokrad View Post


    Hahah what teenager in their right mind would use the internet on such a big screen in front of everyone? hahaha



    how old is his son?
  • Reply 10 of 89
    Quote:

    Acer founder Stan Shih in an interview compared Apple's products to "mutant viruses" which are hard to cure in the short-term. According to the Digitimes report, Shih believes that "PC vendors will eventually find a way to isolate Apple and become immune."



    This has got to be one of the most idiotic comments I've ever seen or heard. Did he ever think that Apple would simply evolve again and leave PC vendors in the dust again once they finally caught up? Or did he think that they were going to stand still, like his company? Mr. Shih, good luck on getting your CEO parachute compensation. You'll need it on your way out.
  • Reply 11 of 89
    I needed a windows laptop and I found an Acer with great specs. What a piece of crap that machine was and not because of OS that was on it. Acer probably has 0 credibility with anyone that has had to use one of their products.
  • Reply 12 of 89
    If Apple products are "mutant virii", then Acer products are a virulent case of gonorrhea.
  • Reply 13 of 89
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,951member
    I guess the real lesson is that everybody likes to thump their own chest. The IP TV concept is still in its infancy, we don't know what it's going to be like two years from now. I suppose anyone that has access to desirable content and a well-laid-out UI that doesn't require too much fiddling set up has a strong chance. The players really need to move beyond techie appeal to get market traction.



    We also don't know what the tablet market is going to be like two years from now any more than anyone had a real idea of what the smartphone market was going to be like when the iPhone was announced. The original model was pretty limited at first, but it later expanded into an ecosystem.
  • Reply 14 of 89
    Wow, that Acer guy is a clueless idiot. I'd think comments like that would mean he'd be replaced pretty fast.



    I mean on one hand, you have Apple which typically releases top quality products that people are fanatic about. Then you have some bozo who is the founder of some low to mid-end computer brand that is just PC maker that is not particularly thought of in high regard.



    Hmmmm, which company has credibility and why should we care what this Shih guy says about a brand he can't even come close to competing with in terms of public perception of quality.
  • Reply 15 of 89
    poochpooch Posts: 768member
    sorry, shih, apple is kicking your ass in all aspects of running a business. and i do mean kicking your ass. sounds like sour grapes to me.
  • Reply 16 of 89
    My initial reaction is that you'd have to be insane to think that the iPad's market share will drop to 20-30 percent. What, exactly, does he think is going to supplant it? What Apple has going for it - and it's obviously realized this - is a mature platform which it can now grow to serve an ever expanding market. For someone to legitimately compete, they'd not only have to create the hardware, which most companies remain hesitant to invest in, but the software as well. iOS already runs an enormous percentage of mobile devices. Windows Mobile couldn't even compete in a market it already owned. Android is the closest thing that iOS has to a competitor; though Google is limited by its inability to develop hardware that can maximize the potential of its software solutions. It's depending on companies who, up until this time, made their living by developing beige boxes and slide out keyboards, and asking them to innovate. They will continue to develop a competitive product, as in and of itself, Google is an innovative company. But they will likely continue to play catchup with iOS in many respects. I simply don't see this as a formula that unseats the iPad with David-and-Goliath like ease.
  • Reply 17 of 89
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by teejaysplace24 View Post


    My initial reaction is that you'd have to be insane to think that the iPad's market share will drop to 20-30 percent. What, exactly, does he think is going to supplant it? What Apple has going for it - and it's obviously realized this - is a mature platform which it can now grow to serve an ever expanding market. For someone to legitimately compete, they'd not only have to create the hardware, which most companies remain hesitant to invest in, but the software as well. iOS already runs an enormous percentage of mobile devices. Windows Mobile couldn't even compete in a market it already owned. Android is the closest thing that iOS has to a competitor; though Google is limited by its inability to develop hardware that can maximize the potential of its software solutions. It's depending on companies who, up until this time, made their living by developing beige boxes and slide out keyboards, and asking them to innovate. They will continue to develop a competitive product, as in and of itself, Google is an innovative company. But they will likely continue to play catchup with iOS in many respects. I simply don't see this as a formula that unseats the iPad with David-and-Goliath like ease.



    The other thing regarding Android... It's only free because Google sees it as their way to get more eyeballs on the web to support their advertising model. If other more effective methods of advertising unseat Google's model, no more Android. Apple already makes serious cash from every sale of their iOS devices.
  • Reply 18 of 89
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,670member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JeffDM View Post


    The IP TV concept is still in its infancy, we don't know what it's going to be like two years from now. I suppose anyone that has access to desirable content and a well-laid-out UI that doesn't require too much fiddling set up has a strong chance. The players really need to move beyond techie appeal to get market traction.



    Agree. The transition to a pervasive IP TV will be a protracted process because the cable co's will not lay down and die without a fight. They are becoming redundant middlemen and will eventually whither.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Newtron View Post


    Very interesting quote. Apple does indeed seem to be wooing unsophisticated technophobes with their newest products.



    Will that strategy work in the long term, with a generation who used computers before they could read? Do they want simplicity or capability?



    They will want simplicity and capability. These devices are for the living room - not a good place to geek out. What people want is easy access to content, period. Whoever can offer the most content with the easiest access will win the battle. Oh, and they will also need the best marketing. I'd say Apple is in an as good a place as Google or any other contender at this point.
  • Reply 19 of 89
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


    If Apple products are "mutant virii", then Acer products are a virulent case of gonorrhea.



    Latin plural of virus is viri, not virii. Extra I in radii is present in singular radIus.
  • Reply 20 of 89
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Shih believes "open" eventually wins.



    Morons always believe that. They're always wrong.
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