No 'Sir:' UK government denied Apple's Steve Jobs knighthood in 2009

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
Apple Chief Executive Steve Jobs was close to being knighted by the Queen of the United Kingdom in 2009, but the plans were reportedly scrapped by the U.K. government because of Jobs' absence at a political conference.



Former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown blocked the proposed knighthood of Jobs in 2009, according to The Telegraph, because the Apple co-founder apparently turned down an invitation to speak at a Labour Party conference. Jobs was said to be knighted for his services to technology.



The plans were apparently so far along that Apple was aware of the proposal and it reached the final stages of approval. But Jobs was apparently denied the honor because Brown and other officials reportedly felt snubbed by Jobs' absence.



"The former MP was told by Downing Street that the decision was related to a failed attempt to attract Mr. Jobs to Labour's annual conference," the report said. "Given his status as a superstar of business and technology, such an appearance would have been viewed as a coup for Mr. Brown."



Bill Gates, former CEO of Apple's rival Microsoft, was named an honorary Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire by Queen Elizabeth II in 2005. Because he is not a citizen of Britain's Commonwealth realms, Gates does not carry the title of "Sir." Jobs, too, would not have been eligible to be a "Sir."



Though Jobs was not knighted, he can boast many other accolades and titles bestowed upon him. In recent years alone, he was named "CEO of the Decade" by both Fortune and MarketWatch. He was also named the Financial Times Person of the Year, in a profile that called his presentation unveiling the iPad a cap to "the most remarkable comeback in modern business history."
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 129
    I didn’t realize being knighted had become an even sillier concept. I can’t imagine Jobs is losing sleep over Brown’s decision.
  • Reply 2 of 129
    2 cents2 cents Posts: 307member
    This is a plus in my book. Who needs a BS title from the queen mum? It's about time that British Royalty face its irrelevancy.
  • Reply 3 of 129
    irelandireland Posts: 17,796member
    They are knighting so many idiots at this stage it's beginning to lose its meaning. I'm not defining Jobs here - it's true.
  • Reply 4 of 129
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ireland View Post


    They are knighting so many idiots at this stage it's beginning to lose its meaning. I'm not defining Jobs here - it's true.



    Like Charlie Sheen being given two & a half knighthoods last week?
  • Reply 5 of 129
    aplnubaplnub Posts: 2,605member
    Can any of the British on here please define the purpose of the Royal Family?
  • Reply 6 of 129
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by aplnub View Post


    Can any of the British on here please define the purpose of the Royal Family?



    All cultures have symbolic references to their past, they just manifest themselves differently.
  • Reply 7 of 129
    ashjashj Posts: 2member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by aplnub View Post


    Can any of the British on here please define the purpose of the Royal Family?



    To make money out of tourists
  • Reply 8 of 129
    pembrokepembroke Posts: 228member
    Meh, a Knighthood ain't what it used to be.



    1. No Round-table invites

    2. No complimentary sword

    3. Little deference from the mass unwashed

    4. No apportionment of huge tracts o' land

    5. Some Civil servants can get them for simply staying in their job long enough.



    yeah, I'm definitely gonna think twice before accepting when my knighthood offer comes through the post.



    Besides, Jobs has his top business credibility to retain. Going to a Labour Party conference would surely damage that credibility. Jobs on stage with Brown? Er, no.
  • Reply 9 of 129
    asciiascii Posts: 5,936member
    I'm surprised the Prime Minister *can* block it, I would have thought it would be entirely up to the Queen.
  • Reply 10 of 129
    ghostface147ghostface147 Posts: 1,629member
    I thought that only English citizens or anyone that was in English territories was allowed to be knighted.
  • Reply 11 of 129
    darendinodarendino Posts: 126member
    If Jobs was an illegal immigrant, he would have got his knighthood, benefits,a house, a car and job for life at the taxpayers expense.
  • Reply 12 of 129
    dr_lhadr_lha Posts: 236member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ascii View Post


    I'm surprised the Prime Minister *can* block it, I would have thought it would be entirely up to the Queen.



    The Queen's role here, much like everything else she does, is entirely ceremonial. The list of those to be knighted are picked by the government, and handed to the Queen to dole out. She doesn't pick them herself.
  • Reply 13 of 129
    kerrybkerryb Posts: 270member
    don't understand how you can be knighted by England's queen if you are not subject to her rule? Is this the UK's version of a Nobel prize? Can anyone explain this?
  • Reply 14 of 129
    allblueallblue Posts: 393member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by aplnub View Post


    Can any of the British on here please define the purpose of the Royal Family?



    You do realise that nearly all US Presidents have been related to the British royal bloodline? And therefore by extension to all the European royal bloodlines as they all hail from the same shallow incestuous gene puddle. As to why these people are our monarchs, well that truly is the proverbial can of worms.
  • Reply 15 of 129
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kerryb View Post


    don't understand how you can be knighted by England's queen if you are not subject to her rule? Is this the UK's version of a Nobel prize? Can anyone explain this?



    The sun never sets on the British Empire?s web servers.
  • Reply 16 of 129
    g_warreng_warren Posts: 713member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kerryb View Post


    don't understand how you can be knighted by England's queen if you are not subject to her rule? Is this the UK's version of a Nobel prize? Can anyone explain this?



    You might want to check the difference between England/Britain/United Kingdom/Commonwealth. The terms are not interchangeable.



    Knighthoods can be given to Commonwealth citizens, but as the original article (Telegraph) points out, a sort of honorary knighthood can be granted to citizens of other countries.
  • Reply 17 of 129
    stuffestuffe Posts: 394member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by aplnub View Post


    Can any of the British on here please define the purpose of the Royal Family?



    History, heritage, tradition, the fact that we managed to keep our Monarchy and have them cede powers to parliament without needing a bloody revolution like we are seeing all over the world (less so these days, as there are less and less monarchies kicking around) should really make our system the envy of the world, not one for sneering at.



    Because they are faced with generic scorn over their place in the world, many have had to re-invent themselves with charitable work which is genuinely quite useful, so while I think Prince Charles is a tit, I know he works hard for a lot of things that I respect, so I respect him in turn.



    Plus, they earn us a boatload of income from Japs and Septics, and we get a wedding/coronation/jubilee every few years for a bonus day off work. The Civil List is worth if FOR THAT ALONE - awesome value for money.
  • Reply 18 of 129
    asciiascii Posts: 5,936member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dr_lha View Post


    The Queen's role here, much like everything else she does, is entirely ceremonial. The list of those to be knighted are picked by the government, and handed to the Queen to dole out. She doesn't pick them herself.



    Well maybe if she did pick them it would be less political. Hmm... I bet Jony Ive would have designed him a kick ass suit of armor.
  • Reply 19 of 129
    chiachia Posts: 713member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ghostface147 View Post


    I thought that only English citizens or anyone that was in English territories was allowed to be knighted.



    I think Sir Sean Connery from Scotland would disagree with you.
  • Reply 20 of 129
    ksecksec Posts: 1,569member
    LOL, in the cult of Apple, It is an honour to UK to be able to name SJ as Sir, not the other way round.



    Anyway, if SJ wanted, all he has to do is to meet whoever responsible and turn on RDF. How hard is that?
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