Adobe continues assault on Apple's Final Cut Pro X with 'switcher program'

Posted:
in Mac Software edited January 2014
Adobe has continued its attempt to capitalize on discontent over Apple's new Final Cut Pro X, courting video professionals to convert to its competing Premiere Pro with 50 percent savings.



Through Sept. 30, anyone who has purchased any version of Final Cut Pro, or even Avid Media Composer, will be able to switch to Adobe's Creative Suite 5.5 Production Premium or Premiere Pro CS5.5 with a 50 percent discount. Both CS5.5 Production Premium and Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 launched in April of 2011.



"We?re hearing from video professionals that they want pro level tools that address cutting edge work but also allow them to use legacy footage and workflows," said Jim Guerard, general manager and vice president of professional video and audio, Adobe. "At Adobe we?ve been in the trenches with video pros for years and with Adobe Premiere Pro CS5.5 and CS5.5 Production Premium we?ve delivered professional-grade tools that are already being battle-tested by some of the most innovative filmmakers, broadcasters and video pros."



Adobe highlighted the features of Premiere Pro CS5.5, including the fact that it is compatible with the latest Mac hardware, namely Thunderbolt ports, 64-bit processors and multicore CPUs. Premiere Pro CS 5.5 is native 64-bit, and provides graphics processor unit acceleration for real-time effects, color correction/grading, and accelerated rendering.



The aggressive discount from Adobe is the latest attempt from the software company to capitalize on the unhappiness some video professionals have expressed over Apple's new Final Cut Pro X.



Earlier this week, Adobe launched a public relations offensive attempting to drum up support for Premiere Pro. PR representatives for Adobe have called attention to documents in assisting users in switching from Final Cut Pro to Premiere Pro.



Adobe now has a dedicated website on switching to Premiere Pro. The main graphic on the page even reads "You're a pro. Make sure your toolset is too," perhaps a reference to some outspoken critics of Final Cut Pro X who have suggested the latest update is not a "pro" application.







Last May, AppleInsider was first to report that Apple was scaling its Final Cut Pro software to better fit the "prosumer" market, rather than high-end professionals. Final Cut Pro X was eventually released earlier this month.



The new software was quickly met with condemnation from some video professionals who believe Apple's new product is vastly inferior to its predecessor. They have also expressed discontent that Final Cut Pro 7 and Final Cut Pro are no longer available for purchase, having been declared "end of life" with the launch of Final Cut Pro X on June 21.



Apple has even been providing refunds to dissatisfied customers who purchased Final Cut Pro X from the Mac App Store. Product managers have also spoken publicly on the matter, revealing that some important features like multicam editing will be added in a future release.



This week, Apple also posted a series of questions and answers on its website, in which it explained that drastic changes to Final Cu Pro X made it impossible to "translate" old projects from Final Cut Pro 7 without changing or losing data. As a result, the ability to import projects from older versions of Final Cut will not be coming to the latest release.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 150
    And Adobe falls all over themselves to try and take advantage. This speaks volumes about the culture at Adobe I think...



    Why can't they produce a version of Flash that is truly mobile ready? Probably because they spend more on marketing and executive salaries than they do on development.



  • Reply 2 of 150
    caliminiuscaliminius Posts: 944member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by fecklesstechguy View Post


    And Adobe falls all over themselves to try and take advantage. This speaks volumes about the culture at Adobe I think...



    Yeah, because Apple didn't spend years doing the same crap with the "I'm a Mac" commercials.
  • Reply 3 of 150
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by caliminius View Post


    Yeah, because Apple didn't spend years doing the same crap with the "I'm a Mac" commercials.



    Implying that's the same in any way.
  • Reply 4 of 150
    srangersranger Posts: 469member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by fecklesstechguy View Post


    And Adobe falls all over themselves to try and take advantage. This speaks volumes about the culture at Adobe I think...



    Why can't they produce a version of Flash that is truly mobile ready? Probably because they spend more on marketing and executive salaries than they do on development.







    They would be extremely stupid not to take advantage of the situation as ANY company would....
  • Reply 5 of 150
    alien987alien987 Posts: 2member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by fecklesstechguy View Post


    And Adobe falls all over themselves to try and take advantage. This speaks volumes about the culture at Adobe I think...



    Why can't they produce a version of Flash that is truly mobile ready? Probably because they spend more on marketing and executive salaries than they do on development.







    So Apple deliberately blocking Flash in iPhones and iPads is a better culture? People should be able to choose whatever they want, no what one person wants.
  • Reply 6 of 150
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by fecklesstechguy View Post


    And Adobe falls all over themselves to try and take advantage. This speaks volumes about the culture at Adobe I think...



    Why can't they produce a version of Flash that is truly mobile ready? Probably because they spend more on marketing and executive salaries than they do on development.







    This is exactly what they should do. They are acting like a well run company with this move. As both a capitalist and opportunist I applaud them.
  • Reply 7 of 150
    jakevin.jakevin. Posts: 71member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by fecklesstechguy View Post


    And Adobe falls all over themselves to try and take advantage. This speaks volumes about the culture at Adobe I think...



    Why can't they produce a version of Flash that is truly mobile ready? Probably because they spend more on marketing and executive salaries than they do on development.







    It's a brilliant opportunity for Adobe and one they're really taking seriously. It is indeed exactly like the "I'm a Mac" campaign - as soon as Vista came out and was trashed those ads attacked it and gave users an alternative: to upgrade to a Mac. It's fair marketing on Adobe's part and I think Apple's attacks on its products such as Flash over the year warrant it even further.



    I don't like that Apple is falling victim to Adobe for inferior software because it's not true to Apple's form but it's an opportunity Adobe have taken and who could blame them. Plus 50% is great for competition and hence consumers.



    Side note: Can't wait to see Steve Jobs mention this whole debacle publicly for the first time. Should be like MobileMe all over again, or perhaps his "Stop me if you've seen it" remark at the iPhone 4 keynote when unveiling the design - always a good laugh.
  • Reply 8 of 150
    smiles77smiles77 Posts: 668member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Alien987 View Post


    So Apple deliberately blocking Flash in iPhones and iPads is a better culture? People should be able to choose whatever they want, no what one person wants.



    Yes, it's better--for most. We pay Apple to do the research and decision making for us in creating a great product; and because we like their work, we purchase their products.



    Many Android fans love the fact that Google and (most) handset makers let them make the phone into what they want. That is their advantage; and because they like that culture, they purchase those products.



    Your choice is in what you choose to buy--not how the companies choose to implement their respective operating systems and handset strategy.
  • Reply 9 of 150
    benroethigbenroethig Posts: 2,782member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by fecklesstechguy View Post


    And Adobe falls all over themselves to try and take advantage. This speaks volumes about the culture at Adobe I think...



    They are are business who sees an opening to bring in disgruntled users of a competitor product make money. Apple would be doing the same under similar circumstances.
  • Reply 10 of 150
    ivladivlad Posts: 739member
    I wouldn't even consider this as news or site worthy. Corporations really do a great circus and full of themselves all the time. And I think a "pro" might be full of it too if he/she falls for these marketing tricks.
  • Reply 11 of 150
    mr. memr. me Posts: 3,219member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Alien987 View Post


    So Apple deliberately blocking Flash in iPhones and iPads is a better culture? People should be able to choose whatever they want, no what one person wants.



    OK, troll. Flash does not work properly on any mobile platform. So I guess Apple is so evil that it fouled-up Flash for its competitors as well as its own platform? Is that your position?
  • Reply 12 of 150
    dick applebaumdick applebaum Posts: 12,506member
    One of the advantages Adobe is extolling is the ability to open FCP7 XML and import sequences in Premiere -- actually as a best effort with a log of any problems. It looks good!



    I found an article that says the FCP7 import is already built into FCPX -- just not activated. Here's the translation from Mac Magazine Brazil (scroll down to the second article):



    http://translate.google.com/translat...%26prmd%3Divns



    ping
  • Reply 13 of 150
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Smiles77 View Post


    Your choice is in what you choose to buy--not how the companies choose to implement their respective operating systems and handset strategy.



    Very true! And I will gladly support any company that is trying to rid the internet of Flash and encourages the development of HTML5 alternatives.



    The internet is a place for open standards that can used by everyone. Even If I did have an Android device, I shouldn't have to wait for Adobe to make a stable version of Flash Player to visit a website! I should just be able to open a browser!
  • Reply 14 of 150
    samwellsamwell Posts: 78member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by fecklesstechguy View Post


    And Adobe falls all over themselves to try and take advantage. This speaks volumes about the culture at Adobe I think...



    Why can't they produce a version of Flash that is truly mobile ready? Probably because they spend more on marketing and executive salaries than they do on development.







    You really should be heeding your own signature.
  • Reply 15 of 150
    welshdogwelshdog Posts: 1,662member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    This week, Apple also posted a series of questions and answers on its website, in which it explained that drastic changes to Final Cu Pro X made it impossible to "translate" old projects from Final Cut Pro 7 without changing or losing data. As a result, the ability to import projects from older versions of Final Cut will not be coming to the latest release.



    Yeah this little item right here is what Abobe will make the most of. Premiere reads FCP 7 projects and FCP X does not. And Apple says they are not going to bother with it. All most editors would want is a way to import an EDL or XML of their timeline with cuts and dissolves and maybe layers without effects. If Apple could manage to offer this simple path a lot of people would be more open to X.
  • Reply 16 of 150
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,946member
    I wonder if Apple would have been better off if they just said from the start that it was a paid preview of some sort.
  • Reply 17 of 150
    djintxdjintx Posts: 454member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jakevin. View Post


    It's a brilliant opportunity for Adobe and one they're really taking seriously. It is indeed exactly like the "I'm a Mac" campaign - as soon as Vista came out and was trashed those ads attacked it and gave users an alternative: to upgrade to a Mac. It's fair marketing on Adobe's part and I think Apple's attacks on its products such as Flash over the year warrant it even further.



    I don't like that Apple is falling victim to Adobe for inferior software because it's not true to Apple's form but it's an opportunity Adobe have taken and who could blame them. Plus 50% is great for competition and hence consumers.



    Side note: Can't wait to see Steve Jobs mention this whole debacle publicly for the first time. Should be like MobileMe all over again, or perhaps his "Stop me if you've seen it" remark at the iPhone 4 keynote when unveiling the design - always a good laugh.



    It is a ridiculous notion to suggest Apple has been attacking Adobe. Since when does opting not to support an inferior product count as an attack? And yes Steve has made public statements including his open letter regarding flash, but this is not an attack either. Tech journalists and consumers wanted to know the situation, so of course Steve is going to give Apple's answer to the situation. Saying that Flash is inefficient and obsolete and crash-happy is not a lie, nor an attack. It is simply the truth. He didn't spew venom at Adobe, and has given them so many opportunities to fix their product. But for some reason they refuse to spend time improving this product. I think they probably could improve it if they wanted to. So either they do not want to, or they cannot. Either way, who would want this on their iPad or iPhone. Not me. I am extremely happy in my flashless mobile existence. Good riddance.
  • Reply 18 of 150
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,165member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post


    One of the advantages Adobe is extolling is the ability to open FCP7 XML and import sequences in Premiere -- actually as a best effort with a log of any problems. It looks good!



    I found an article that says the FCP7 import is already built into FCPX -- just not activated. Here's the translation from Mac Magazine Brazil (scroll down to the second article):



    http://translate.google.com/translat...%26prmd%3Divns



    ping



    This is excellent news. Apple really need to get their PR act in order on this one as well as remove the EOL on 7 for now at least.
  • Reply 19 of 150
    conrailconrail Posts: 489member
    The discounted price for the Production suite is $150 cheaper than the retail price for either After Effects or Photoshop. Even if you're staying with FCP 7 or are completely thrilled with FCP X, this is a great deal.
  • Reply 20 of 150
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Damn! I'm definitely taking them up on it. As long as I can keep all the FCP software I'm going to get a bunch of CS5.5 for 50% off!. Whatever, about Premiere, it is useful to have I guess but the rest of the suite is a total bargain at that price.



    EDIT: Actually maybe not. I just reread that it is the Production Premium version which is not what I want after all
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