HP exec: 'Apple may like to think they own silver, but they don't'

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited January 2014
When asked about similarities between the design of HP's new Ultrabook and Apple's MacBook Air, an HP executive dismissed concerns that Apple could sue.

Stacy Wolff, vice president of Industrial Design at Hewlett-Packard, did admit that there are similarities between his company's new Envy Spectre XT laptop and Apple's MacBook Air. But according to Engadget, he said that's more due to the way technology has developed than Apple driving design in the industry.

"Apple may like to think they own silver, but they don't," Wolff said. "In no way did HP try to mimic Apple. In life there are a lot of similarities."

Speaking at the Global Influencer Summit in Shanghai, China, Wolff highlighted what he feels are some key differences between the Spectre XT and the MacBook Air. He noted that HP's new Ultrabook is rubber-coated at the bottom, and it is made of magnesium, compared to Apple's use of CNC aluminum.

He also highlighted a brush pattern on the Spectre XT that isn't found on the MacBook Air. And HP's Spectre line also includes dedicated Beats Audio processing, for higher quality sound.

"If you want to look at a macro level, there are a lot of similarities to everything in the market that's an Ultrabook today," he said. "It is not because those guys (Apple) did it first. It's just that's where the form factor is leading it."

Spectre XT


In April, it was said that Intel hopes to see shipments of as many as 30 million Ultrabooks this year. The company designed the Ultrabook specification for Windows PC makers after Apple found great success with its new MacBook Air.

Ultrabooks feature many of the same defining features as the MacBook Air: solid-state storage, instant-on capabilities, and super-thin design thanks to the lack of an optical drive.

Apple is expected to take design cues from its MacBook Air and bring them to the MacBook Pro lineup in the coming months. Apple's updated MacBook Pros will be powered by Intel's latest-generation Ivy Bridge processors, which began shipping in April.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 166
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member


    Blah, blah, blah.


     


    Explain this, CEO-man.

  • Reply 2 of 166
    True, but Apple came to it first.
  • Reply 3 of 166
    esummersesummers Posts: 887member


    I disagree with HP.  I think that form factor is lead by Apple.  Apple is the only company these days that is an early adopter of technology.  It may be the next logical step, but everyone else would still be putting out big plastic boxes if not for Apple's pushing the limits and forcing their component suppliers to produce the parts needed to make the next step.  The only other company I've seen advance anything might be Amazon for advancing the eInk form factor.  It is obvious, but they were the company to mass produce it to take it to the next step.  It is easier to follow then to lead.

  • Reply 4 of 166
    So is Beats Audio the new Bose? Can anyone actually hear a difference in ABX tests?
  • Reply 5 of 166
    tcaseytcasey Posts: 199member


    HP just admitted they follow and don't lead...Clearly to follow you need someone to follow and maybe he's follow samsung and samsung is copying apple..so thats ok then...lets hope copying does not lead to rewards.

  • Reply 6 of 166
    dualiedualie Posts: 331member


    Meh, so what. It looks somewhat similar to a MBP, but the similarity ends at the operating system. The chances of anybody getting confused and buying an HP when they really wanted a Mac are next to nil I'd say.

     

  • Reply 7 of 166
    gprovidagprovida Posts: 247member


    When you don't or can't innovate, then copy, is works for SAMSUNG.  However, as usual, companies try to copy the facade not the deeper content that Apple addresses.  They may fool some customers, but in the end this doesn't succeed.  It either fails by "skating to where the puck is vs where it will be" and so huge effort is invested in trying to guess Apple's next move [ergo Apple's secrecy] or fails to deliver the full "job to be done" that Apple provides in its eco system.  Recall companies have been trying to copy Apple's MacBook Airs since they first came out and failed and/or overpriced.   


     


    My bet like phones, tablets, and other Macs they will be indistinguishable and compete on price to race to the bottom with little to no margins and corner cutting to save money.  A real to strategy for success.  


     


    Ironically, INTEL's concerns are not Ultras but trying the delay the Post-PC world until their processes can really compete in mobile space.  Again not a formula or a long term strategic and competitive advantage for PC makers.


     


    I wonder how long before Horace Diedu starts showing the decline and disappearance of PC makers as he has so dramatically illustrated on cell phones for essentially the same reasons?

  • Reply 8 of 166


    I think he thinks we're all daft. That keyboard... that's a mac styled keyboard. Just because they made the rest of the computer ugly, doesn't mean they didn't steal design cues from Apple. Be real, HP. Don't be hating.  

  • Reply 9 of 166

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by gprovida View Post


    When you don't or can't innovate, then copy, is works for SAMSUNG.  However, as usual, companies try to copy the facade not the deeper content that Apple addresses.  They may fool some customers, but in the end this doesn't succeed.  It either fails by "skating to where the puck is vs where it will be" and so huge effort is invested in trying to guess Apple's next move [ergo Apple's secrecy] or fails to deliver the full "job to be done" that Apple provides in its eco system.  Recall companies have been trying to copy Apple's MacBook Airs since they first came out and failed and/or overpriced.   


     


    My bet like phones, tablets, and other Macs they will be indistinguishable and compete on price to race to the bottom with little to no margins and corner cutting to save money.  A real to strategy for success.  


     


    Ironically, INTEL's concerns are not Ultras but trying the delay the Post-PC world until their processes can really compete in mobile space.  Again not a formula or a long term strategic and competitive advantage for PC makers.


     


    I wonder how long before Horace Diedu starts showing the decline and disappearance of PC makers as he has so dramatically illustrated on cell phones for essentially the same reasons?



     


      Before samsung, it worked for panasonic. They made a mint copying and improving on sony and then undercutting them on price. The world keeps on spinnin.

  • Reply 10 of 166
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 2,432member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

    "In no way did HP try to mimic Apple. In life there are a lot of similarities."


    To quote Yoda, "Do or do not. There is no try." And that's why we can build evolutionary trees of MP3 players, smartphones, tablets and laptops that are all rooted at Apple.

  • Reply 11 of 166
    jollypauljollypaul Posts: 328member


    "Apple may like to think they own XXX, but they don't,"


     


    Better hang on to that phrase, Mr. VP of Industrial "Design". When you copy Apple's next new look, you will need to repeat it.

  • Reply 12 of 166
    dualie wrote: »
    Meh, so what. It looks somewhat similar to a MBP, but the similarity ends at the operating system. The chances of anybody getting confused and buying an HP when they really wanted a Mac are next to nil I'd say.

     

    The point isn't that someone will mistakenly buy this when they wanted an MBA or MBP. It's that another company who is apeing industrial design from Apple is using the tired argument of how this design was 'obvious' and 'just the way things were going'. Yet, no one was doing it until after Apple.
  • Reply 13 of 166
    yensid98yensid98 Posts: 302member


    "It is not because those guys (Apple) did it first. It's just that's where the form factor is leading it."


     


    Has anyone else ever heard of a form factor leading an industry over a company?  Doesn't a company need to design the form factor?  He talks as if form factors are entities unto themselves.  What fantasy world does he live in?  Still, in spite of them copying the MBA as closely as possible to hopefully get people confused, it still won't run OSX, but a MBA will run Windows.


     


    Side Note:


    I really dislike the new AppleInsider forums.  I click the link to reply and as expected I am taken to the sign in page.  After I sign in I expect to be taken to the post I was reading with an active "reply" field, but instead I'm taken to a forum list of all posts.  This has happened time and time again.  Also, quoting is not as good as it was and I can no longer double click a word and correct the spelling.  Ugh!

  • Reply 14 of 166
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,090member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    Blah, blah, blah.


     


    Explain this, CEO-man.



    It's just the 'natural evolution', 'natural development', or whatever other bullshit so phrased. Somehow, whatever Apple is is only the 'natural evolution' of things, and only after Apple does them. 

  • Reply 15 of 166
    htoellehtoelle Posts: 89member


    Dear HP


    There are some things  you and your company do very well. I have had printers and scanners over the years and even 1 Computer before I learned that living without the Windows OS was better for one's personal health (mentally speaking) and for the heath of one's wallet.  However judging from the foregoing article , I must compliment you and your Company on your grasp of BS and the skills  required in its delivery. Well done !!


     


    Respectfully Yours


     


    A. Macuser

  • Reply 16 of 166
    snovasnova Posts: 1,281member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by gprovida View Post


    When you don't or can't innovate, then copy, is works for SAMSUNG.  However, as usual, companies try to copy the facade not the deeper content that Apple addresses.  They may fool some customers, but in the end this doesn't succeed.  It either fails by "skating to where the puck is vs where it will be" and so huge effort is invested in trying to guess Apple's next move [ergo Apple's secrecy] or fails to deliver the full "job to be done" that Apple provides in its eco system.  Recall companies have been trying to copy Apple's MacBook Airs since they first came out and failed and/or overpriced.   


     


    My bet like phones, tablets, and other Macs they will be indistinguishable and compete on price to race to the bottom with little to no margins and corner cutting to save money.  A real to strategy for success.  


     


    Ironically, INTEL's concerns are not Ultras but trying the delay the Post-PC world until their processes can really compete in mobile space.  Again not a formula or a long term strategic and competitive advantage for PC makers.


     


    I wonder how long before Horace Diedu starts showing the decline and disappearance of PC makers as he has so dramatically illustrated on cell phones for essentially the same reasons?



    great post!  I was sitting on a plane next to a guy responsible for promoting the Ultrabooks design.  I asked him, why are you trying so hard to promote Windows ultra books instead of MacBooks Airs?  Why must Macbook Air fail for Ultrabooks to succeed? Doesnt the Macbook Air have Intel chips in it anyways? Why are you guys doing this? He keep trying to avoid answering this question. Finally it he admitted to me, "we think Apple will move to ARM Macbook Airs'.

  • Reply 17 of 166
    yensid98 wrote: »
    He talks as if form factors are entities unto themselves.  What fantasy world does he live in?

    Maybe the ultrabook design is a Platonic form?
  • Reply 18 of 166
    yensid98 wrote: »
    He talks as if form factors are entities unto themselves.  What fantasy world does he live in?

    Maybe the ultrabook design is a Platonic form?
  • Reply 19 of 166
    christophbchristophb Posts: 1,438member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


    Blah, blah, blah.


     


    Explain this, CEO-man.



     


    Yep, it's pretty blatant.  It's ridiculous that he can, with a straight face, pretend that being first is no big deal and sluff it off as just natural progression.  I'd bet he wouldn't be so generous if it was his work that's being practically mimicked.  HP takes no risk here since Apple has already proven the design in the marketplace.

  • Reply 20 of 166
    yensid98yensid98 Posts: 302member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post


    It's just the 'natural evolution', 'natural development', or whatever other bullshit so phrased. Somehow, whatever Apple is is only the 'natural evolution' of things, and only after Apple does them. 



    So true.  I don't really mind HP copying Apple's MBA.  What really bugs me is that they try to make it like their design ideas aren't influenced at all by Apple when it's So obvious that they are.  Just stop lying to us HP.

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