Low-end Retina MacBook Pro now available with 512GB, 768GB drives

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited January 2014
Apple's base model MacBook Pro with Retina display can now be custom built with solid-state hard drives of 512 and 768 gigabytes.

The new build-to-order configurations first appeared in Apple's online store on Wednesday, when they were noticed by MacRumors. Users who select the low-end 2.3-gigahertz quad-core Intel Core i7 processor can have a 512-gigabyte flash storage drive for an additional $500, or 768 gigabytes for an extra $1,000.

In addition, users can also choose to upgrade the base model to a faster 2.6-gigahertz quad-core Intel Core i7 chip for an extra $100. Previously, that chip was only available with a 512-gigabyte flash storage drive for $600 more than the base price of $2,199.

Users can also upgrade the processor to a 2.7-gigahertz quad-core Intel Core i7 processor for $350. Build-to-order configurations also come with 16 gigabytes of 1600MHz DDR3L SDRAM for an extra $200.

Shipping times for the new MacBook Pro with Retina display remain estimated at one to two weeks as Apple works to catch up with demand for its latest notebook computer.

MacBook


The 15-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display can also be found in standard configurations from third-party resellers. It is available with 8 or 16 gigabytes of RAM and a 256-gigabyte solid-state drive with the 2.3-gigahertz processor, while the 2.6- and 2.7-gigahertz configurations come with 512 gigabytes of storage. Prices from resellers can be found in AppleInsider's Mac Price Guide, included below:

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 53
    Well, I like that the BTO option is there on the entry-level model, but I didn't realize it would cost that much.
  • Reply 2 of 53
    Well, I like that the BTO option is there on the entry-level model, but I didn't realize it would cost that much.

    What did you think it would cost?
  • Reply 3 of 53
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,141member
    If anyone can drive down costs of SSD Apple can by adoption on this scale.

    I installed SSD as my boot drive in a 2010 MBP i7 (Replaced the optical, added Trim Enabler) and it is like using an iPad now for speed, it totally shocked me how fast it is now. HDs are the new floppy, they have to go!
  • Reply 4 of 53


    Why would I want to buy a lower end Retina Macbook with soldered RAM that I can't upgrade later? Such a configuration feels like a big win for Apple, but not for the consumer. 

  • Reply 5 of 53
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member


    Originally Posted by tikiman View Post

    Why would I want to buy a lower end Retina Macbook with soldered RAM that I can't upgrade later?


     


    Because you're buying the RAM upgrades at purchase?

  • Reply 6 of 53


    It looks like the SSD upgrades aren't the only thing new to the lower-priced option—the 1GB GT650M used to be relegated to the 2.7GHz model, but is now standard on all Retina Display models:


     


     


    image

  • Reply 7 of 53
    smiles77smiles77 Posts: 668member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Avelino Maestas View Post


    It looks like the SSD upgrades aren't the only thing new to the lower-priced option—the 1GB GT650M used to be relegated to the 2.7GHz model, but is now standard on all Retina Display models:


     


     


    image





    Now that is big news.


     


    Edit: My mistake. It appears the lower-end model has always come with that GPU. Nothing new to see here.

  • Reply 8 of 53

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


     


    Because you're buying the RAM upgrades at purchase?



     


    Right, but that wasn't my point. They have an 8GB and a 16GB option for soldered RAM. Why would I want to take the 8GB? Wouldn't I want to take the highest amount of RAM possible since I'll be stuck with that amount for the life of the product I own and we all know how memory consumption seems to creep up over time?

  • Reply 9 of 53


    Good to see the usual US -> UK Mark-up applies to the processor upgrades , ie the 2.6Ghz upgrade is $100 which is £100 according to apple


     


    Allowing for VAT, this is still a fairly large "Apple tax" for being in the UK, $100 = £64.16 at current exchange rates, add VAT, thats  £76.99, a clear £23 profit for apple


     


    Given "Build to orders" are not stocked in the shop, this is a nice little earner for Apple


     


    For reference the 512MB SSD, its $500 --> £400 ($500  = £320.77, add VAT = £384.92, a profit of £15)


     


    Still, I'm happy we finally get some custom options ... though I'd preferr the 500MB SSD to be a lot cheaper (£200/$200 would have been a nice uplift from the base price)

  • Reply 10 of 53
    Is the 2.3GHZ, 16GB, 256GB for $3,004.00 under Apple Education a typo?
  • Reply 11 of 53


    No, I bought my low-end MBPr on launch day, and I have the GT 650M with 1 gig of ram in mine.


     


    image

  • Reply 12 of 53
    conrailconrail Posts: 489member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post



    If anyone can drive down costs of SSD Apple can by adoption on this scale.

    I installed SSD as my boot drive in a 2010 MBP i7 (Replaced the optical, added Trim Enabler) and it is like using an iPad now for speed, it totally shocked me how fast it is now. HDs are the new floppy, they have to go!


    I usually don't buy into hype like this, but I agree 100% with this sentiment!

  • Reply 13 of 53

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Smiles77 View Post




    Now that is big news.



    Can you explain why, for us lay people?

  • Reply 14 of 53
    lwslws Posts: 9member


    Basically, there is no need for a pre-configured "high end" model anymore, at a quick glance it looks like the upgrade options come at the same price as the faster model costs. Or am I missing some important difference?

  • Reply 15 of 53


    I haven't bought one yet, but when they came out I was sad because I don't need the extra processing but wanted the extra graphics oomph. The Apple website where I pulled the earlier image still says this: 


     


     


     


    image


     


    But I'm glad you got hooked up. 

  • Reply 16 of 53
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,208moderator
    Well, I like that the BTO option is there on the entry-level model, but I didn't realize it would cost that much.

    It shouldn't really cost that much but for some reason Apple don't deduct the cost of parts they take out to do the upgrade. $500 is a good price for 512GB as that's less than $1/GB and even some of the cheapest SSDs aren't much less:

    http://www.amazon.com/Crucial-2-5-Inch-Desktop-Install-CT512M4SSD2BAA/dp/B005V19AG8/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1343835507&sr=8-5&keywords=crucial+v4

    but the machine ships with 256GB so the upgrade is really $500 for 256GB, which is quite expensive. They should really be able to offer the 512GB upgrade for $300. It's interesting that they can even offer a 768GB option - that's on a blade form factor. Even 2.5" drive manufacturers tend not to go that high and when they do, they cost loads:

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820227797&Tpk=ocz octane 1tb
  • Reply 17 of 53


    I was more than ready to embrace a retina display for iPhone and iPad. I really have no desire to have a retina display iMac or MacBook Air though. I am more than satisfied with the resolution of my desktop and laptop for now. 

  • Reply 18 of 53
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    I'm glad they changed this. System speed and system capacity don't seem to scale the same way. But Apple would know this so why the change now? I wonder if they simply didn't have the supply before they put it with the high-end model to help push those sales with the BTO SSD cards.

    Marvin wrote: »
    It shouldn't really cost that much but for some reason Apple don't deduct the cost of parts they take out to do the upgrade. $500 is a good price for 512GB as that's less than $1/GB and even some of the cheapest SSDs aren't much less:
    http://www.amazon.com/Crucial-2-5-Inch-Desktop-Install-CT512M4SSD2BAA/dp/B005V19AG8/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1343835507&sr=8-5&keywords=crucial+v4
    but the machine ships with 256GB so the upgrade is really $500 for 256GB, which is quite expensive. They should really be able to offer the 512GB upgrade for $300. It's interesting that they can even offer a 768GB option - that's on a blade form factor. Even 2.5" drive manufacturers tend not to go that high and when they do, they cost loads:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820227797&Tpk=ocz octane 1tb

    Is the price difference for 256GB and 512GB really linear in this case? I don't know if they have the room to use double the chips which would make it linear but if they have to use denser chips for that setup the cost per GB change will be unbalanced for Apple.
  • Reply 19 of 53
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 2,449member


    Why should it cost $50 less ($60 less in the education store) to upgrade a low-end configuration than to start with the better-configured system?

  • Reply 20 of 53
    lwslws Posts: 9member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by lws View Post


    Basically, there is no need for a pre-configured "high end" model anymore, at a quick glance it looks like the upgrade options come at the same price as the faster model costs. Or am I missing some important difference?



     


    Answering my own question: The prices are indeed the same, but the store websites for BTO for both models look slightly different and, I dare say, better for the "high end" model.


     


    Observe!


     


     


    image   vs   image


     


    Look at the far right column and the top column that lets you select from the categories (MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, ...)


     


    /sarcasm

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