Apple says purple fringing is normal for iPhone 5 camera

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 94
    tylerk36tylerk36 Posts: 1,037member


    I can create the same thing on my iPhone 4s.  Why is this such a big deal now?

  • Reply 22 of 94
    macrulezmacrulez Posts: 2,455member


    deleted

  • Reply 23 of 94
    shompashompa Posts: 343member


    Everyone with an iPhone5 I know have this problem. 



    Purple haze on ordinary pictures. Something that does not appear on other cameras/phones including the iPhone4S. 


     


    Many of the Apple fans/users I know are returning their iphones. Something I have not seen in over 12 years following Apple products. This is huge. 

    Antenna gate (that was really a non issue, since it was a USA/AT&T problem) can't compare to this. Lens covers solves the problem. Maybe Apple will release free lens covers? 

    Otherwise: this is a flawed design. Steve would fire Tim on the spot. 

  • Reply 24 of 94
    muppetrymuppetry Posts: 3,331member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DESuserIGN View Post




    Quote:



    Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post


    . . .


    2. I've taken a couple hundred photos with the iPhone 5, many which include the sun, and not once have I experienced this purple fringing. 


    . . .



    If it's not a common occurrence, great. I don't see it as a problem.


    But what I see in the example image in the article is very unusual. I've never seen flaring like that from a headlight!


    If it routinely occurs in that kind of a lighting situation, it's a glaring (no pun . . . ) camera design fault.



     


    I agree that is not the common purple fringing at edges that is often seen in digital images. My first question would be whether the phone was in a case. A reflective surface near the field of view of the lens might produce that kind of flare with strong off-axis light sources.

  • Reply 25 of 94
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,757member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tylerk36 View Post


    I can create the same thing on my iPhone 4s.  Why is this such a big deal now?



     


    Because the media have drawn attention to it. And now all of a sudden, everyone has this "problem." 

  • Reply 26 of 94
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,384member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by shompa View Post


    Everyone with an iPhone5 I know have this problem. 



    Purple haze on ordinary pictures. Something that does not appear on other cameras/phones including the iPhone4S. 


     


    Many of the Apple fans/users I know are returning their iphones. Something I have not seen in over 12 years following Apple products. This is huge. 

    Antenna gate (that was really a non issue, since it was a USA/AT&T problem) can't compare to this. Lens covers solves the problem. Maybe Apple will release free lens covers? 

    Otherwise: this is a flawed design. Steve would fire Tim on the spot. 



     


    'Everyone' you know with an iPhone 5 has this problem? Even when many (like me) have never experienced it once after a couple hundred photos?


    'Many of the Apple users you know' are returning the phones? Yeah, I call bullshit on that. Complete bullshit. It's so easy to say unlikely, trollish, lying garbage like this online when you don't need to back it up. And yes, you're a troll, your last statement confirms it. Really, 'Steve would fire Tim on the spot'? The guy who SJ decided to give the company to, after working with him for more than a decade and trusting him with the company during his leaves of absence,  this is who he would 'fire on the spot' for this non-issue that affects all cameras to some degree? Such catastrophic issue that somehow all reviews I've read proclaim this to be one of the best cameras on any phone, period? And that the phone itself is a remarkable feat in design and engineering, in so many ways? Yeah, ok. Go back and play with all your imaginary iPhone 5 owners who are returning this imaginary phones, and spare us the 'what Steve would do' drivel. 


     


    Not only do you know many people who bought the iPhone 5, *ALL* of them somehow encountered this problem (even though it only made blog headlines today), they were able to communicate to you the fact they encountered this problem, and in addition to this a large number of them already decided to rectify the situation by taking the most extreme measure possible, which is returning the phone. Yeah, not in the LEAST bit likely. You forgot to end your post with the requisite 'I've been an Apple fan since 1600 BC' mandatory line which is supposed to convey how much it pains you to speak negatively about Apple since you're such a giant Apple fan. 6.5/10. 


     


    Oh and re this appalling 'flawed design' of a phone.. (a review from a site that regularly trashes Apple)


     


    http://thenextweb.com/apple/2012/10/01/tnw-review-iphone-5-apple-creates-archetype/


    Quote:


    The iPhone 5 is the most capable and carefully designed smartphone ever. There is no other on the market that combines the best screen in the world with a completely custom processor and a wafer thin chassis to produce an LTE-fast device with industry standard or better battery life.


    The only way that the iPhone 5 could be unimpressive is if you’re the kind of person that thinks that the more aftermarket fiberglass fins that a car has, the faster it will go.


    This device is a tour de-force performance of a company firing on all cylinders. The internal components work together in concert to deliver one of the most pleasant and powerful experiences of any ever produced. If you’re reading these sentences and rolling your eyes, then you probably have an allergy to hyperbole, and I understand because I do too. But this isn’t hyperbole, it isn’t exaggeration.


    The more research I did into the construction of the iPhone 5, the more I put the pieces together about how they managed to combine these parts to deliver the product they did, the more insanely impressive this device is. 




     


    Yeah, what a catastrophe. 

  • Reply 27 of 94
    rkevwillrkevwill Posts: 224member


    Suggestion. Don't be an idiot, and try taking pics with bright lights, or sun in the background. My parents taught me that in the 50's, when they were using Hassies, Leicas, Contax's and Rolleiflex's, and I was using my Brownie Starflash.

  • Reply 28 of 94
    muppetrymuppetry Posts: 3,331member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by muppetry View Post




    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DESuserIGN View Post




    Quote:



    Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post


    . . .


    2. I've taken a couple hundred photos with the iPhone 5, many which include the sun, and not once have I experienced this purple fringing. 


    . . .



    If it's not a common occurrence, great. I don't see it as a problem.


    But what I see in the example image in the article is very unusual. I've never seen flaring like that from a headlight!


    If it routinely occurs in that kind of a lighting situation, it's a glaring (no pun . . . ) camera design fault.



     


    I agree that is not the common purple fringing at edges that is often seen in digital images. My first question would be whether the phone was in a case. A reflective surface near the field of view of the lens might produce that kind of flare with strong off-axis light sources.



     


    Not the case in fact. I reproduced approximately the lighting conditions and found the same effect on an IP4 and a similar effect on a couple of $400 consumer-level digital cameras. No sign of it on a Nikon D200 with high-quality glass. I suspect it might be down to the anti-reflection lens coatings that suppress multiple internal reflections in the lens assemblies.

  • Reply 29 of 94
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by muppetry View Post


    I agree that is not the common purple fringing at edges that is often seen in digital images. My first question would be whether the phone was in a case. A reflective surface near the field of view of the lens might produce that kind of flare with strong off-axis light sources.



    That is a good point. I just got a case for my iPhone 5 at Best Buy made by Griffin (named for the New iPhone which is why I think they are unavailable at the Apple store). This case has a huge opening around the camera lens and has a black color on the edge of the opening. I've seen some iP4 cases that have very little area opening around the lens.


     


    There is always going to be odd artifacts around the edges of a lens, sometimes just referred to as fall off by photographers, but it can include things like this flare as well. There are so many odd characteristics of different full SLR lenses costing hundreds of dollars, I can't imagine that a tiny little lens from a smartphone would be without any compromises.

  • Reply 30 of 94
    thomaspin wrote: »
    I have seen a little of this with my iPhone 5 in the transition from dark interiors to bright windows, as an example.

    This fringing (chromatic aberration) is easily removed in a vaiety of processing tools.  I use Lightroom which has excellent - and very simple - adjustments to correct this sort of thing.  Not a big deal.  Not FringeGate.

    Remove? There are Photoshop filters for ADDING lens artifacts. And Instagram for adding all kinds of color aberrations.

    Speaking of FringeGate, anyone else notice that the blue lens flare is back in Season 5 premiere of Fringe? Why would anyone want a perfect lens?
  • Reply 31 of 94
    shompa wrote: »
    Everyone with an iPhone5 I know have this problem. 


    Purple haze on ordinary pictures. Something that does not appear on other cameras/phones including the iPhone4S. 

    Many of the Apple fans/users I know are returning their iphones. Something I have not seen in over 12 years following Apple products. This is huge. 

    Antenna gate (that was really a non issue, since it was a USA/AT&T problem) can't compare to this. Lens covers solves the problem. Maybe Apple will release free lens covers? 

    Otherwise: this is a flawed design. Steve would fire Tim on the spot. 

    Use of hyperbole. It gave your parodist position away.
  • Reply 32 of 94


    Frankly whether this is real fault (i.e. a miss on the design folks hands) or not depends on how significant the purple fringing is - but there's two different things here - chromatic aberration (purple fringing) and lens flare.  


     


    On the photography sites (DPReview for example) they always check for purple fringing and how bad it is...normally you might see it with the edge of white building next to a dark background and you'd see a little purple edge running along the white (many folks wouldn't notice it without blowing the image to the max to see it and looking for it).  A small amount is somewhat expected, a large amount means the camera will be avoided by folks who are into photography and would be considered a design fault of the manufacturer (for not fixing that before releasing it to manufacturing since it can be minimized in design and post processing even).


     


    DPReview has their review up for the 5 now and here's their analysis overall of the 5's camera (they do a nice unbiased job reviewing cameras no matter the manufacturer):


     


    The iPhone 5 is a fine mobile device, with an excellent camera. In qualititative terms it's not the best camera out there, and nor is it the best camera on a smartphone (the Nokia 808 has that honor, for now) but it offers satisfying image quality, some neat functions like auto panorama and HDR mode, and - crucially - it is supremely easy to use. It isn't much better than the iPhone 4S, as far as its photographic performance is concerned, but it isn't any worse (notwithstanding a somewhat more noticeable propensity towards lens flare). When manufacturers employ pixel-binning to achieve higher ISO settings we don't normally celebrate the fact, but in the case of the iPhone 5, it gives you greater flexibility in poor light (i.e., you might actually get a picture now, where you just wouldn't with the iPhone 4S) and the drop in quality is unnoticeable when the images are used for sharing/web display. 


     


    http://www.dpreview.com/articles/6867454450/quick-review-apple-iphone-5-camera


     


    They have an entire page dedicated to dissecting the issue with Purple Haze / Fringe / Flare here:


     


    http://www.dpreview.com/articles/6867454450/quick-review-apple-iphone-5-camera/3


     


    So it appears there's some lens flare associated with the 5, but this is not a huge issue on the camera.  As the photography experts at DPReview say:


     


    Really, our advice is not to worry. Just do what you should do anyway, and avoid putting bright lights near the edge of the frame when shooting. 

  • Reply 33 of 94
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 9,233member


    Here's a 5 page thread about purple fringing on the Leica M9. For those who are unaware, the Leica M9 retails for about 7 grand, and that's just for the body. image


     


    http://www.l-camera-forum.com/leica-forum/leica-m9-forum/195456-purple-fringe-problems-leica-m9-5.html

  • Reply 34 of 94
    muppetrymuppetry Posts: 3,331member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post


    Here's a 5 page thread about purple fringing on the Leica M9. For those who are unaware, the Leica M9 retails for about 7 grand, and that's just for the body. image


     


    http://www.l-camera-forum.com/leica-forum/leica-m9-forum/195456-purple-fringe-problems-leica-m9-5.html



     


    This isn't fringing though.

  • Reply 35 of 94

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by muppetry View Post





    This isn't fringing though.


     


    Right this is lens flare and only happens when you put a bright light on the edge of the frame, keep them from the edge of the frame (as you're supposed to do with all camera's) and you're good.

  • Reply 36 of 94


    Crappy Map, terrible camera, buggy cellular.... Apple is doom!


     


    Meanwhile, Google, MS, HP and Samsung are banging their heads against the porta johns to figure out how to sell 5 million crapware per weekend.

  • Reply 37 of 94
    pkaypkay Posts: 2member


    Thank you thank you thank you.  I have really had it with stupid, entitled, ignorant people who aren't continually amazed at what the iPhone (and other miniaturized technology) can do. Yes, some purple fringing is normal for digital sensors. It is a spec in most professional reviews: ALL sensors have it, or something like it. Given the givens, Apple (and everyone else out there with customers) has to be very patient and be very nice, even when they act like spoiled brats, hiding behind the anonymity of the web.

  • Reply 38 of 94
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    I can assure you that you have no idea what you are talking about. You can introduce lens flare in any lens ever made. The characteristic of which will vary with the lens design.
    desuserign wrote: »
    OK, I take the "outraged people" role.
    There's no possible way that the "purple fringing," like in the example image above, is normal or acceptable. I can assure you that it isn't anything like "normal chromatic aberration" either (not proportianllay related to distance from the center of the lens.) I would describe it as pronounced "purple flaring" possibly caused by internal reflections in the lens or as an artifact of the design of the sensor. This is a camera design problem.
    If Apple thinks this is normal and acceptable, I would just see this as another reason (along with the aluminum case) to either stick with the 4S or wait for the next decently designed iPhone---a pretty difficult resolution to keep, in light of the other very real & tantalizing HW & SW improvements made with the iP5!
  • Reply 39 of 94
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    Your response here indicates a rather significant ignorance when it comes to optics and physics. It would be best to stop posting else you will convince everyone of your ignorance.
    desuserign wrote: »
    Well, that's a classic example of how people spin a bug into a "feature." Just because some people become nostalgic for the glaring faults of of old doesn't mean we all are. Apple could always just replace the Camera app with Instagram, but I wouldn't like it.
  • Reply 40 of 94
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 6,100member


    Freaking whiners and trolls are really infesting this thread as usual.



    My 2-1/2 year old iPhone has this problem, my BRAND NEW Canon S100 powershot camera I use for underwater photography exhibits a similar problem, an older Canon camera had the same problem, my professional photographer buddy with his $7K Nikon camera gets lens flare as well.



    But NO... Apple gets this problem so they should be held with its feet to the fire!!



    You guys are a bunch of iHating a$$hats simply hating for the sake of hating.  Buzz off to an Android site and spew your nonsense there.

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