iOS 6 Maps, Lightning connector have no effect on iPhone 5 demand, survey finds

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
Negative headlines haven't suppressed consumer interest in the iPhone 5, which is seeing "unprecedented" demand, according to the latest survey from ChangeWave Research.

The poll of 4,270 primarily North American consumers was conducted in September, and found that 19 percent of consumers considered themselves "very likeLy" to buy an iPhone 5, while 13 percent said they were "somewhat likely."

The numbers show a significant increase in demand for the iPhone 5 over the iPhone 4S from a year ago. Last year, 10 percent of consumers said they were "very likely" to buy an iPhone 4S, while another 11.5 percent considered themselves "somewhat likely."

The stats show that consumers who indicated they are "very likely" to buy the iPhone 5 has nearly doubled from that of the iPhone 4S. Until now, Apple's iPhone 4S has been the most successful smartphone in history, but the iPhone 5 is expected to surpass it.

ChangeWave


"Despite the media attention surrounding both the Apple Maps issue and the Apple Lightning port issue, neither has had an impact on the massive numbers of buyers queuing up to buy the iPhone 5," said Dr. Paul Carton, ChangeWave's vice president of Research. "Rather, the survey results show both issues hardly rank as bumps in the road."

ChangeWave also asked respondents running iOS 6 if they had experienced problems with Apple Maps, and the survey found that the new mapping software has not been a major issue for users. Among those polled, 90 percent reported "no problem at all," while 3 percent said iOS 6 Maps are a "very big problem," while 6 percent said the issue is "somewhat of a problem."

The data shows that any perceived issues with iOS 6 Maps are less of a concern than the "antenna-gate" controversy with the iPhone 4. In 2010, ChangeWave's polling found 7 percent of new iPhone 4 owners characterized the reception issue as a "very big problem," while another 14 percent said it was "somewhat of a problem." Nearly two thirds reported they "hadn't experienced any problem."

ChangeWave 2


As for the new, smaller Lightning port on the iPhone 5, customers likely to buy Apple's latest handset were asked for their thoughts on the change that makes it more difficult, and in some cases impossible, to use legacy accessories. Nearly a third ? 31 percent ? said the change to the Lightning port is "not much of a problem," while 26 percent said it's "no problem at all.

However, 6 percent characterized the Lightning port switch as a "very big problem," and 31 percent said they felt it was "somewhat of a problem."

Even though more than two-thirds of respondents expressed some level of concern over the Lightning port, the survey found it will not stop consumers from buying the iPhone 5. Among those who said they are unlikely to buy the iPhone 5, 0 percent said their decision was made because of the Lightning adapter.

The iPhone 5 had the strongest launch yet of any iPhone, as Apple announced the device sold 5 million units in its first three days of availability. It's believed that Apple could have sold many more handsets over the launch window, but sales are believed to have been held back by limited supply.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 90
    It's possible that there are some people who never use maps on their phone... and who don't own any 30-pin speaker docks.
  • Reply 2 of 90
    Apple is doomed.™
  • Reply 3 of 90
    Do American carriers have some kind of reservation system in place for getting an iPhone? My friend was put in queue two and a half weeks ago at #2000+ and only now is he at #10 with Rogers in Canada. He's in Toronto so I'd figure we have more people wanting to buy than anywhere else in the country (you know, centre of the universe and all). So are people getting their phones some other way, or is supply actually that problematic? Like the article says the demand should be there, ordering now puts you at 6000 in queue I've heard, but I've only seen a few out in public as well.
  • Reply 4 of 90
    I love the Lightning connector. I hated the old 30-pin one, which was a pain to orient properly. I'm completely mystified by those who complain about what to me is a clear improvement.
  • Reply 5 of 90
    clemynxclemynx Posts: 1,510member
    The exact date of the surveys is important. The 4 came out in June 2010 so a July 2010 survey was potentially conducted weeks later. On the other hand, a september 2012 survey when the 5 came out on the 21st was conducted just after release.
  • Reply 6 of 90

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by nw3227 View Post



    I love the Lightning connector. I hated the old 30-pin one, which was a pain to orient properly. I'm completely mystified by those who complain about what to me is a clear improvement.


     


    I completely agree that the Lightning connector is a massive improvement and was a much needed change but I can also understand the complaints of people with older docks / car connectors that only support the 30 pin dock port who are now having to shell out at least $30 on an adapter assuming they can even get away with only having one of them.


     


    The other issue is the loss of analog and "iPod Out" support through lightning which will completely break very old docks whether you have an adapter or not. That's not so bad if it's only a $50 speaker dock you have to replace, but is a bit more of an expensive problem if it is your car that is no longer supported...

  • Reply 7 of 90

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by nw3227 View Post



    I love the Lightning connector. I hated the old 30-pin one, which was a pain to orient properly. I'm completely mystified by those who complain about what to me is a clear improvement.


    +1

  • Reply 8 of 90

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DaveMcM76 View Post


     


    I completely agree that the Lightning connector is a massive improvement and was a much needed change but I can also understand the complaints of people with older docks / car connectors that only support the 30 pin dock port who are now having to shell out at least $30 on an adapter assuming they can even get away with only having one of them.


     


    The other issue is the loss of analog and "iPod Out" support through lightning which will completely break very old docks whether you have an adapter or not. That's not so bad if it's only a $50 speaker dock you have to replace, but is a bit more of an expensive problem if it is your car that is no longer supported...



    I am sure there will be 3rd Party accessories that are able to port the iPhone's headphone jack through a 30-Pin adapter.

  • Reply 9 of 90
    vaelianvaelian Posts: 446member
    Well, if the music app wasn't working properly on my iPhone I wouldn't notice it either, since I rarely use it to listen to music. I would even go as far as to state that many people barely use their iPhones for anything other than they'd otherwise use dumb phones, especially in the US, where the iPhone is heavily subsidized. Ask the same question to people buying an unlocked version from Aple and I bet your findings will be a lot different.

    For instance, I told a friend of mine who was complaining about the iPhone 4S' battery problems to disable Location Services (because the problem was caused by a defective GPS unit) temporarily and ask for a replacement, and she was all happy about the former solving her problem because she didn't care about the latter, so a year later she's still using a defective iPhone 4S. Might be anecdotal, but doesn't go far from most people's mentality.
  • Reply 10 of 90
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 1,999member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by ClemyNX View Post



    The exact date of the surveys is important. The 4 came out in June 2010 so a July 2010 survey was potentially conducted weeks later. On the other hand, a september 2012 survey when the 5 came out on the 21st was conducted just after release.


     


    The dates aren't when the surveys were taken, the dates are when the "issues" blew up.


     


    I've found that most of the issues we read online, aren't issues at all to most everyone else. I've also noticed issues with Apple products are usually brought up by those who do not own the device. Possibly in some weird attempt to justify their decision to not buy Apple and keep them from "ruling the world." Yes, I've actually had people say that to me. LOL

  • Reply 11 of 90
    sricesrice Posts: 115member
    Apple customers know that Apple products (almost always? always?) exceed their expectations, so they are willing to buy a new Apple product sigh unseen.

    In fact, the leaks act as a "pre-availability review" for buyers -- by the time the product is available for launch, most of the important details are known.

    I love the lightening adapter -- so much so I wish micro/mini-USB would be dropped by the world in favor of it.

    Maps is a non-issue. I paid $30 for the TomTom app 3 years ago -- it's always been my default mapping app on my iPhone, since Google maps sucks pretty hard on the iPhone.

    Once again, Apple wins -- and I win. I love my IP5.
  • Reply 12 of 90
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 1,999member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Vaelian View Post



     I would even go as far as to state that many people barely use their iPhones for anything other than they'd otherwise use dumb phones for


     


    I'd have to disagree with that comment and so would most statistics. Given the fact that iOS has by far the largest web usage statistics and app sales, most iOS users use their devices for a lot more than just a phone. Tim Cook has even stated that the average iOS user now downloads 100 apps.

  • Reply 13 of 90
    christophbchristophb Posts: 1,461member
    nw3227 wrote: »
    I love the Lightning connector. I hated the old 30-pin one, which was a pain to orient properly. I'm completely mystified by those who complain about what to me is a clear improvement.

    Agree. Looking forward to it on The New iPad 2. My only disappointment is the lack of availability of lighting to USB cables and the 30pin to Lightning adapters until a week or so into Oct.

    And iOS 6 Maps has served me well so far.
  • Reply 14 of 90
    vaelianvaelian Posts: 446member
    mjtomlin wrote: »
    vaelian wrote: »
     I would even go as far as to state that many people barely use their iPhones for anything other than they'd otherwise use dumb phones for

    I'd have to disagree with that comment and so would most statistics. Given the fact that iOS has by far the largest web usage statistics and app sales, most iOS users use their devices for a lot more than just a phone. Tim Cook has even stated that the average iOS user now downloads 100 apps.

    I don't think you can conclude anything from that other than that iOS users use their browsers more than other mobile phone users, which doesn't in any way tackle what I suggested, not to mention that the iOS web share has a lot of iPads in there.
  • Reply 15 of 90

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by OriginalG View Post



    Do American carriers have some kind of reservation system in place for getting an iPhone? My friend was put in queue two and a half weeks ago at #2000+ and only now is he at #10 with Rogers in Canada. He's in Toronto so I'd figure we have more people wanting to buy than anywhere else in the country (you know, centre of the universe and all). So are people getting their phones some other way, or is supply actually that problematic? Like the article says the demand should be there, ordering now puts you at 6000 in queue I've heard, but I've only seen a few out in public as well.




    I don't know I generally order mine directly from Apple

  • Reply 16 of 90
    So far Maps has been excellent for me. I haven't done anything real taxing with it but it's been great having turn by turn and having Siri set up a travel route. As far as the connector goes I don't have any devices that directly connect to the old 30 pin so I'm good there too. Still can't believe what an improvement the 5 is over my old iPhone 4.
  • Reply 17 of 90



    #next_pages_container { width: 5px; hight: 5px; position: absolute; top: -100px; left: -100px; z-index: 2147483647 !important; }
    I've had Zero problems with Apple Maps in and around Philadelphia. And I've been praying for for the 30-pin's death for years.


     


    Lighting is fantastic.


     


     


     
  • Reply 18 of 90
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,715member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post





    ChangeWave also asked respondents running iOS 6 if they had experienced problems with Apple Maps, and the survey found that the new mapping software has not been a major issue for users. Among those polled, 90 percent reported "no problem at all," while 3 percent said iOS 6 Maps are a "very big problem," while 6 percent said the issue is "somewhat of a problem."




     



     


     


    wait, the media made a mountain out of a mole hill? Tell me it ain't so.


    It's obvious that 90% of all those surveyed are fanbois. iOS 6 Maps is the biggest problem since the cold war. /s

  • Reply 19 of 90
    vaelianvaelian Posts: 446member
    Oh, forgot to mention: why do people survey the US market about products when that market is known to be the first to receive coverage on everything? Why not ask The Rest Of The World what we think about Apple Maps?
  • Reply 20 of 90
    jupiteronejupiterone Posts: 1,564member
    davemcm76 wrote: »
    I completely agree that the Lightning connector is a massive improvement and was a much needed change but I can also understand the complaints of people with older docks / car connectors that only support the 30 pin dock port who are now having to shell out at least $30 on an adapter assuming they can even get away with only having one of them.

    The other issue is the loss of analog and "iPod Out" support through lightning which will completely break very old docks whether you have an adapter or not. That's not so bad if it's only a $50 speaker dock you have to replace, but is a bit more of an expensive problem if it is your car that is no longer supported...

    Well I can't understand the complaints. Every single one of these people bought the product knowing exactly what they were getting as far as the new connector was concerned. For the few that were surprised when they opened the box, they had 14 days to return it. If it is really THAT bad for them to buy an adapter, then why in the world would they buy the new phone? There are two other models that are cheaper that could have been purchased if they needed a phone. No, I really think that for the folks that are complaining, it is really just a minor inconvenience that they chose to put up with....but hey, complaining on the internet is free so have at it!
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