Google CEO Larry Page says rivalries with Apple & Amazon hurt users

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  • Reply 41 of 159
    Larry: If you pay the other companies the money you make off them, I am sure that they will be more open to you. What does Apple or Amazon ask of you?
  • Reply 42 of 159
    Is that so Larry?
    Then why did u plant a mole in apple "(he scum scmidth) and copy ios and got onto the crell phone buisness?
    If what you preach is our that companies are in different buisness with different buisness models... Why did nt you stick to search and advertizing.... Why did u roam in apple territory and started competing head on.
    Hypocrisy at its best.
  • Reply 43 of 159
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,729member


    I don't feel I 'suffer' very much but it is beginning to bother me that more and more Google tries to claw me into their world when all I want is unbiased search. I like DuckDuckGo.com but still use Google. Maybe Apple should buy DDG.

  • Reply 44 of 159
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,095member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by rsdofny View Post



    Larry: If you pay the other companies the money you make off them, I am sure that they will be more open to you. What does Apple or Amazon ask of you?


    Google does share their advertising revenue with the sites that display the ads. . .


    like AppleInsider. 


     


    Google also pays for the privilege of being the default search provider. I forget how many millions they paid to Foxfire. Apple doesn't give that slot to Google for free either. They profit from Google services.

  • Reply 45 of 159
    I agree with "Tallest Skil", who suggested Google not start rivalries. Larry Page has finally realized that hiring Eric Schmidt who's a typical, greedy corporate type was a mistake. You didn't see Apple starting a search engine company. They were happy to let Google do what they do best. Had Eric Schmidt kept Google out of the device and operating system business, Apple would be excited to be more accommodating and willing to work with Google. Same goes for Samsung. Talk about two companies that "bit the hand that fed them". It all comes back to GREED. Samsung wants it all as well as Google. I think Apple does as good a job as any corporate entity at picking their battles, innovating and staying on track with quality product, unique ideas and quality design. When there is an opening they think about it, make sound decisions and go forward. Eric Schmidt, sat on the Apple board, pretended to be friends with Jobs and then ripped him off like nobody else. Can you imagine trusting someone enough to put them on your board then watch them take the ideas and technology and give it to your competitors for free. Larry Page is right, it's the public that pays the price but as a business man myself I can certainly understand Apple not trusting it's thieving rivals. 'I'm just saying" as we say in Minnesota.
  • Reply 46 of 159
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    anonymouse wrote: »
    Wow, I'm surprised you could fit so many misrepresentations of facts into a single post. It's a nice little fairy tale you present, but...
    I guess preaching his gospel over at MacRumors isn't enough... :lol:

    I'm waiting to hear more about how multitouch was all the rage in 2006 and Apple was just in the right place at the right time. Even though Eric Schmdit admits that Apple created the current smartphone revolution.
  • Reply 47 of 159
    While I was in Engineering, I used to have so much respect for Google. I lost it since 4 to 5 years. Happily sitting in Apple's board - bast*rd Schmidt had copied all Apple's Business plan and ideas. They have completely completely totally ripped off Apple iOS, giving opportunities to Samscum like companies. I hate you Google!

    Now, you are telling Welcome and let's not hurt users. Shame on you!

    Oh, yeah! You told "Don't be evil." First stop being stupid. You morons.
  • Reply 48 of 159
    shenshen Posts: 434member
    BS. Google did something well to get on top, they sell people. You and I are the product, and companies are the customer. I see no reason to lime or support that. I love Apple, and I like amazon. Google is about as evil a tech company as we have today, and taking that crown from ms took some struggle. I refuse to give a damn about what they say.
  • Reply 49 of 159
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,385member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Daekwan View Post


     


    Pretty much.


     


    I love some of google services, mainly because its usually the best "free" option in most cases.  But there's nothing "friendly" about the way the do business.



    Google wants business model based on everything they do is free, but not necessarily legal, and they don't want to spend the money on tech support.  They'll let ANYONE post content on YouTube, whether it's legal or not.  They just want to infuse your life with advertisements.   Google STILL has a crappy website.  The YouTube GUI STILL sucks.  For a company that supposed to be so forward thinking, their GUI for everything they do is about the silliest I've seen.   They just come up with catchy names and then market them.  I don't take Google seriously as a company.

  • Reply 50 of 159
    kerrybkerryb Posts: 270member


    Google the new Borg?


     

  • Reply 51 of 159
    Schmidt showed the iPhone prototype to his girlfriend at the time, while he was sitting on the Apple BoD. He claims he wasn't that interested in it personally.
  • Reply 52 of 159

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SockRolid View Post



    Re: "the three biggest technology companies"

    Really? Larry thinks that Amazon is a technology company?

    Wall Street seems to think it's a retail company. That's why Amazon's P/E is so big.

    Wall Street understands retail. Technology not so much.


    Amazon is most definitely a technology company. Amazon handles at least 1% of all consumer internet traffic. They host a metric shit ton of web sites.

  • Reply 53 of 159

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by KDarling View Post


     


    An oft-repeated claim that doesn't even make sense.


     


    First off, Jobs _NEVER_ accused Schmidt of stealing anything from board meetings.  He only went "thermonuclear" three years after the iPhone debut, when Google finally turned on multi-touch.   At that point, Jobs called Google copiers... as if Apple had invented multi-touch, which they did not.


     


    Google bought Android back in mid-2005.  Suddenly Apple became very interested in making a phone as well and started creating the first iPod based UI test mules.  A year later, Apple _invites_ Schmidt to their board.   Who was spying on whom?


     


    Finally, Schmidt was only in a few months' meetings (at which we don't even know if he was shown anything... heck, Apple didn't even show the iPhone to the CEO of Cingular until late December 2006) before the iPhone debut in 2007.   After that, anyone could copy it.  You sure didn't need someone invited to the Apple board to do that.


     


     


    It was symbiotic, as Apple needed Google's help.  By Nov 2006 the iPhone had no Maps app.  It sure didn't have cell location or YouTube, either.  They had to rush to add the Maps before the debut two months later, and that only happened because Google bent over backwards to help them.   No doubt Schmidt helped.   Can you imagine the debut without Maps?  It was a major feature.   So was YouTube and location services later that year.


     


     


     


    Everyone looks at others' stuff.   For example, it took a 7" Samsung tablet to convince Apple and Jobs to do the iPad Mini.


     


    image



    This is Larry Page trying to defend Google's position and legalise IP stealing. The interview is crock of crap and these opinions come from the same mindset. I wish I could be intelligent and rebuke every point, but this is so wrong, I do not want to waste my time!

  • Reply 54 of 159
    gatorguy wrote: »
    If your curious about the answer, listen to the interview, or read the synopsis over at Fortune. This was just the smallest and least important "click-bait" snippet from it.
    http://tech.fortune.cnn.com/2012/12/11/larry-page/

    Good read; thanks for the link!

    "How will you decide when to do a Motorola Nexus device, and what do you tell Samsung and LG?
    I think there's a lot of complexity in that question. Maybe I'll talk more generally about that area.
    The right way to think about it is how do we get amazing products into users' hands in the most cost-effective, highest quality way possible and to the most people. That's what we do as a business, and that's what we've done with Android."


    "One of the first instances of Plus being woven into other Google services was in search. There was a fair amount of criticism. In some cases where somebody is not an active user of Google Plus, you put their [Google Plus profile in search results]. That is not necessarily the best use of that real estate. And some people went as far as saying you were betraying the promise of always giving the best, unbiased search results. What's your reaction to that?
    What you should want us to do is to really build amazing products and to really do that with a long-term focus. Just like I mentioned we have to understand apps and we have to understand things you could buy, and we have to understand airline tickets. We have to understand anything you might search for. And people are a big thing you might search for."
  • Reply 55 of 159
    tzeshantzeshan Posts: 2,351member


    I used to hold respect for Google but no more.  Google has done evil to iPhone users.    iPhone users suffered three years without a free navigation built in app.

    Google purposely refused to provide navigation capabilities to iPhone Maps before iOS 6.  Google purposely degenerate iPhone users experience wrt to Android users. 

  • Reply 56 of 159
    kdarlingkdarling Posts: 1,640member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Bilbo63 View Post


    It's like Apple having their CEO on Google's board while planning to build a search engine to compete head to head with Google's. Google knew what they were doing and they kept Eric as close to Apple as they could until right before they went public with their iOS clone. Greasy and dishonest to say the least.



     


    Interestingly, Apple's current Chairman of the Board was also on both Apple and Google's board from 2004-2009.   Should people accuse him of stealing ideas from Google?    Hardly.  Board members are smarter than that.  If anything happened on either side, they would've been booted off and legal action taken.


     


    Quote:


    Originally Posted by jungmark View Post


    from Wired: It began back in 2002, soon after the iPod, when Jobs realized that the convergence of mobile phones and music players would force Apple to get into the mobile phone business.


     




     


    Thinking about making a phone isn't the same as actually doing a production project.  We know from multiple sources that the port of OSX into iOS didn't even start until early January 2006, for example.   Forestall's testimony at the recent California trial as that the hardware exploration only started in mid 2005.


     



    Quote:


    yes, they would show a third party an internal device before they show the Board. I don't know if you know anything about Boards, but they are involved at a high level at what the business goals are. I assume an iPhone fitted that criteria.




     


    Let's say they did show the board in late 2006 before it even fully worked (in the biography, Jobs said they didn't have a decently working product even by late Fall.  It wouldn't be like him to show that to the board until it was to his satisfaction).   What good would two months' notice have done for Google over the past five years?   He was only on the board for a very short time before EVERYONE saw the iPhone.  There was NO need to him to steal anything.


     


    Again, Jobs never claimed Schmidt stole inside info.  That's purely an internet fantasy of people who seem to need to hate something.


     


    Quote:


    can you imagine it without Maps? i know ,so tragic because other phones had maps at the time, what no?




     


    Well yes smartphones did.  Like many other people, at the time that the iPhone was first shown off, I had Google Maps on my WinMo touch smartphone, along with TomTom navigation.

  • Reply 57 of 159

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by KDarling View Post


     


    An oft-repeated claim that doesn't even make sense.


     


    First off, Jobs _NEVER_ accused Schmidt of stealing anything from board meetings.  He only went "thermonuclear" three years after the iPhone debut, when Google finally turned on multi-touch.   At that point, Jobs called Google copiers... as if Apple had invented multi-touch, which they did not.


     


    Google bought Android back in mid-2005.  Suddenly Apple became very interested in making a phone as well and started creating the first iPod based UI test mules.  A year later, Apple _invites_ Schmidt to their board.   Who was spying on whom?


     


    Finally, Schmidt was only in a few months' meetings (at which we don't even know if he was shown anything... heck, Apple didn't even show the iPhone to the CEO of Cingular until late December 2006) before the iPhone debut in 2007.   After that, anyone could copy it.  You sure didn't need someone invited to the Apple board to do that.


     


     


    It was symbiotic, as Apple needed Google's help.  By Nov 2006 the iPhone had no Maps app.  It sure didn't have cell location or YouTube, either.  They had to rush to add the Maps before the debut two months later, and that only happened because Google bent over backwards to help them.   No doubt Schmidt helped.   Can you imagine the debut without Maps?  It was a major feature.   So was YouTube and location services later that year.


     


     


     


    Everyone looks at others' stuff.   For example, it took a 7" Samsung tablet to convince Apple and Jobs to do the iPad Mini.


     


    image



    Regardless, if they were planning to go from a "partner" to competing "head on" with Apple in the exact same space, Eric should have resigned from Apple's board long before he did. The fact that he hung around as long as he possibly could before resigning from the board speaks pretty loudly. He was gathering intel. Any way you slice it, the way that Google handled this is greasy and no way to treat your "partner". As I said, if Apple's CEO sat on their board all the while planning compete head on with them in search, it would be equally greasy. Come on! Google basically cloned iOS for crying out loud.


     


    Jobs never PUBLICLY accused Eric of anything, but I would have loved to be a fly on the wall.

  • Reply 58 of 159
    tzeshantzeshan Posts: 2,351member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by KDarling View Post




    Thinking about making a phone isn't the same as actually doing a production project.  We know from multiple sources that the port of OSX into iOS didn't even start until early January 2006, for example.   Forestall's testimony at the recent California trial as that the hardware exploration only started in mid 2005.



     


     


    Not true.  I remember hearing Steve Jobs in an new iPod introduction event that Apple is working on even bigger things. 

  • Reply 59 of 159

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by KDarling View Post


     


    Interestingly, Apple's current Chairman of the Board was also on both Apple and Google's board from 2004-2009.   Should people accuse him of stealing ideas from Google?    Hardly.  Board members are smarter than that.  If anything happened on either side, they would've been booted off and legal action taken.


     



    Uh yeah, but Apple wasn't competing with them in head to head in search, so what's your point?


     


    Also, do you seriously expect people to believe that Google had next to no advanced knowledge of what Apple was doing with the iPhone? Google was writing apps for the iPhone! Of course they did!

  • Reply 60 of 159

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by KDarling View Post


     


    Interestingly, Apple's current Chairman of the Board was also on both Apple and Google's board from 2004-2009.   Should people accuse him of stealing ideas from Google?    Hardly.  Board members are smarter than that.  If anything happened on either side, they would've been booted off and legal action taken.


     



     


    Are you still trying to breathe life into your fairy tale? Given it up, pull the plug, it's brain dead.

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