NYC mayor blames increase in crime on demand for Apple products

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Comments

  • Reply 61 of 102
    philboogie wrote: »

    Trouble is that not all carriers support it.
  • Reply 62 of 102
    Everyone who owns an iPhone should be allowed to carry gun.
  • Reply 63 of 102
    hmmhmm Posts: 3,405member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post


     


    Times Square was better before. It was interesting, it was shady, there were many porn shops and funny characters there. It certainly had a vibe. It wasn't family friendly, but screw families. 


     


    Now, it's sanitized, it's sterile, it's boring, it's all commercialized, taken over by big name chains, everything is over-priced and it's where tourists walk around way too slowly as if they're in some sort of Disneyland. I tend to avoid Times Square if I can help it.





    I remember it being the way you're describing it at least a decade ago. How far back are we talking?

  • Reply 64 of 102
    And I blame my iPhone being stolen on the police being more worried about towing cars than stopping crime occurring in the streets.
  • Reply 65 of 102
    How about blaming crime on all the sleazeball perpetrators? Stop making excuses for the thugs who commit crimes, please.
  • Reply 66 of 102

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by PhilBoogie View Post





    That's already in place

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_Equipment_Identity_Register


    I wrote SOLID tracking system for a reason. if CEIR and IMEI were effective who would activate the thousands of stolen phones?

  • Reply 67 of 102
    Crime is on increase because of Obama! Not apple
  • Reply 68 of 102
    asciiascii Posts: 5,941member
    Don't blame crime on the fact that people have nice things. It's up to the authorities to protect your things whether they're nice or not.
  • Reply 69 of 102
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    r1sko wrote: »
    I wrote SOLID tracking system for a reason. if CEIR and IMEI were effective who would activate the thousands of stolen phones?

    From what I recall about S. Korea the IMEI is a great measure you just need to have laws that require the carriers to verify an IMEI is clear and register it with the user prior to activation.
  • Reply 70 of 102
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    philgar wrote: »
    I think people aren't really listening to the real message of this story.  It looks like NYC wants to help stop the stealing of apple devices, however they need help from apple owners.  A big part of the blame is likely the huge subsidies that phone makers pay for phones, but another part of the problem is how easy it is to sell stolen apple products.  Most people who have a phone think of it as costing $200 at most, and don't consider the $500 that the carriers are putting toward it.  If they realized they were holding a $700 device, they might be more careful about flashing it around in public.  People know better than to flash around expensive jewelry on a subway, or show that you're carrying a bunch of money etc.  Why shouldn't they be equally careful with their phones?  And the city is trying to convince people to do that. Phones and tablets should be guarded more carefully.  Throwing a phone in a loose coat pocket while on the subway is not a smart idea.

    As far as what apple has to do with it, it's all due to apple's popularity.  It's not that an iphone is inherently that much more valuable than an android phone, but rather that it's SO easy to unload a stolen iphone because there are so many used iphones for sale.  If a particular model of an android phone gets stolen, checking craigslist and pawn shops for that particular model might be an effective strategy, as there likely aren't too many used models for sale.  iPhones are so popular, and have so few models that unloading one is a breeze.  Likely with no questions asked whatsoever.  

    Really, the people who should take the most away from this are A: apple product owners who need to be more careful, and B: insurance agencies who should looking into charging apple product owners more because of the increased crime associated with apple products.

    Phil

    The bolded part is true.

    The italicized part is nonsense (other than, of course, the fact that insurance companies set your premiums based at least partially on the value of what they're insuring).
  • Reply 71 of 102

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by charlituna View Post



    I suspect that it isn't skewed due to apple being more stolen but rather android and flip phones are generally so cheap it's not worth the time and effort to file a police report etc to get your insurance to pay to replace. Folks just buy a new one out of their pocket.




    Why would a criminal steal something that they know was nearly worthless vs something they know is worth over $200?  They are not stealing junk phones so they can take them to radio shack and recycle them, they are specifically stealing more valuable Apple products for resale.

  • Reply 72 of 102
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,980member
    What kind of bacon!!!? C'mon, there's only one kind of real bacon (note my user tag). Now pour some maple syrup on that!

    It's not called Canadian bacon in Canada, I don't even think it's called bacon at all. It's really just ham.
  • Reply 73 of 102
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,980member
    jragosta wrote: »
    The bolded part is true.
    The italicized part is nonsense (other than, of course, the fact that insurance companies set your premiums based at least partially on the value of what they're insuring).

    It's not totally that far fetched. Bike locks with guarantees that your bicycle won't get stolen are exempt if you live in NYC.
  • Reply 74 of 102
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,980member
    hmm wrote: »

    I remember it being the way you're describing it at least a decade ago. How far back are we talking?

    Up until the mid 90s before then it was sleaze bag city and much more fun.
  • Reply 75 of 102
    Typical Bloomberg. Don't blame the criminals, blame the victims.
  • Reply 76 of 102
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,980member
    Typical Bloomberg. Don't blame the criminals, blame the victims.

    I would say a good amount of the thefts are crimes of opportunity, kinda like leaving your car running unattended. You'd be surprised how many people will commit a crime when given the chance to do so very easily
  • Reply 77 of 102
    dasanman69 wrote: »
    It's not called Canadian bacon in Canada, I don't even think it's called bacon at all. It's really just ham.

    You're half or 33% right. Most Canadians won't understand this, ironically.
  • Reply 78 of 102


    My iPhone 5 stole my heart. I sentenced it to execution of my apps and iForgave it.

  • Reply 79 of 102


    What?? Breast feeding is required by law in New York?? I hope there is no age limit!!!!


     


    The solution to the theft in iPhones can be solved by Apple. They need to get away from the thinner iPhone 5 and go back to the thicker form factor of the iPhone 4. In the extra space inside they need to fill it with plastic explosive. On the "Find My Phone" app they need to make the choices "Play Sound", "Lost Mode"(lock), "Erase My iPhone" and "Detonate".

  • Reply 80 of 102
    Not satisfied with taking away citizens' Second Amendment rights, Bloomberg has gone after the First Amendment's guarantees of freedom of expression. Register your electronic devices. Then monitoring what you do with those devices. Finally, bans and confiscation. Limiting your access to advanced communications will be rationalized by pointing out the vast problems caused by Internet fraud, identity theft, flash mobs, etc. The mainstream media, eager to regain absolute control over everything you see and hear, will gleefully report every crime committed on an unregulated information marketplace. Horror stories will abound. Perverts. Invasions of privacy. Cell phones causing gas stations to explode.

    Soviet communism could not withstand the fax machine. They could not restrict access to fax machines without falling behind the West technologically. But allowing access to fax machines meant that it was much harder to hide the failings of the communist system. Between a rock and a hard place, communism was unsustainable. It fell.

    The first successful revolution by texting was in the Philippines. And it happened more than once there.

    You think Bloomberg has not noticed this? He wants dissent shut down. This is but one of many tactics that he will use to do it.
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