NYC mayor blames increase in crime on demand for Apple products

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  • Reply 81 of 102
    hmmhmm Posts: 3,405member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post





    Up until the mid 90s before then it was sleaze bag city and much more fun.




    That explains it. Thanks.

  • Reply 82 of 102
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,453member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by anonymouse View Post


     


    This is just part of Bloomberg's and Kelly's attempt to turn NYC into a surveillance state. Why anyone would hand over information about their cell phone to the NYPD with their history of Civil Rights violations is beyond understanding. 



     


    While I agree that the NYPD does violate personal liberties, simply taking the serial # of your iPhone is no big deal -- they do the same thing for bicycles for which they also provide a free engraving service.     However, why the police are targeting the line of people who haven't actually bought their iPhones yet doesn't quite makes sense to me.   Wouldn't it have made more sense to target the people coming out of the store with a new iPhone in their hands?


     


    Furthermore, unless they happen to catch the robber committing another crime the same day and he/she has stolen iPhones on them, the chances of getting back your iPhone is nil.    I had a car stolen about ten years ago and the cops laughed when I asked if there was any chance of getting it back.  I really don't think they make recovering your iPhone much of a priority.


     


    As for NYC, it's the safest large city in the United States.    The murder rate (414) is the lowest it's been since they started keeping detailed crime statistics in 1963, 70% of the victims had criminal records and the vast majority were between people who knew each other. 


     


    I see tons of people every day using all kinds of devices on the subways and elsewhere in plain sight.   I'm not sure I'd do that if I were riding the train at 2am, but at other times, I think it's pretty safe.   

  • Reply 83 of 102


    why are people stealing devices with built in location tracking?

  • Reply 84 of 102


    Originally Posted by alandail View Post

    why are people stealing devices with built in location tracking?


     


    Because thieves are idiots.


     


    Fortunately for the thieves, most of the people with the devices are also idiots and don't have the built-in location tracking turned on.

  • Reply 85 of 102
    A
    hmm wrote: »
    dasanman69 wrote: »
    Up until the mid 90s before then it was sleaze bag city and much more fun.


    That explains it. Thanks.
    Aces!
  • Reply 86 of 102
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    alandail wrote: »
    why are people stealing devices with built in location tracking?

    Because thieves are idiots.

    Fortunately for the thieves, most of the people with the devices are also idiots and don't have the built-in location tracking turned on.

    Very easy to turn it off and I assume that most are aware of this by now.

    Apple still doesn't have an option to protect Settings, Mail & Privacy, or just the Find My iPhone feature with a PIN like they do with most of the items in Reset.

    The best you can do is use Parental Guidance to disable Accounts -or- Location Services. I choose Accounts as I'm less likely to alter those. Now, this isn't that much of an issue if you have your device locked but I don't lock my iPad hence my need for it.

    That said, a thief can always just turn off the device. I wish there was a way that you could prevent it from doing that. The only thing that comes to mind is the hard reset will ONLY restart it, not turn it off so the only way to do a shutdown is to do the on-screen slide but it will require a PIN first. This is the only way I see that can help protect your device without impeding the basic utility of it.

    That that said said, thieves could then use a lead-lined bag, or some other RF blocking material to transport your device until the battery dies or they can take it apart. In the end the user just needs to keep track of their items because I don't see Apple products getting less appealing or holding their value less than they do today.
  • Reply 87 of 102
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,946member
    Don't service providers in other countries blacklist known stolen devices? Why is that not being done here? I recall it practically killed the desirability of stolen phones where implemented.
  • Reply 88 of 102
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    jeffdm wrote: »
    Don't service providers in other countries blacklist known stolen devices? Why is that not being done here?

    They do, including carriers in the US. The problem isn't that it's possible it's how it maintained. If you get AT&T to blacklist a phone you have stolen that's fine but there are other carriers in the US that use GSM-based networks that you'd have to have the device blacklisted on. I think AT&T allows you do it but your device has to be active on their network at the time thus making it easy to go to other networks.

    But even if there was a law and national DB in the US for this your stolen device could still be sent to another country for use.

    Now lets say there is a worldwide DB of IMEIs that functions perfectly thus making it hard to ship stolen phones overseas. A thief could then have the IMEI changed to something else. The IEMI is hardcoded just like the BIA (Burn in Address) on a NIC that represents a MAC address in SW but you can change the MAC address if you so desire. That means we'd also have to have laws that make it illegal for the IMEI to be changed and for the IEMI to be registered and verified prior to activation.

    I've traveled to countries where they require a lot of paperwork and ID checks for just getting a per-parid SIM for your phone. I'm not sure I'd want to go through that much trouble even though I do want the extra security.
  • Reply 89 of 102
    noelosnoelos Posts: 104member
    charlituna wrote: »
    I suspect that it isn't skewed due to apple being more stolen but rather android and flip phones are generally so cheap it's not worth the time and effort to file a police report etc to get your insurance to pay to replace. Folks just buy a new one out of their pocket.

    But similarly, why would a criminal steal an item they can't sell? If they're that cheap, why knock them off at all?
  • Reply 90 of 102
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    They do, including carriers in the US. The problem isn't that it's possible it's how it maintained. If you get AT&T to blacklist a phone you have stolen that's fine but there are other carriers in the US that use GSM-based networks that you'd have to have the device blacklisted on. I think AT&T allows you do it but your device has to be active on their network at the time thus making it easy to go to other networks.
    But even if there was a law and national DB in the US for this your stolen device could still be sent to another country for use.

    And that's the key. A lot of stolen iphones probably end up in Russia and third world countries.
  • Reply 91 of 102


    I have to stop bringing my 27" iMac on the NYC subways. Had my 3rd one stolen last week. 

  • Reply 92 of 102
    To translate; "As long as New Yorkers have nothing of value, they won't get mugged."

    If everyone would go back to Sony Walkmans and straw hats -- everything wold be safe.

    And let's go back to 8 oz cokes and women with dresses down to their socks while we are at it.
  • Reply 93 of 102
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MacOSR View Post

    And we wonder why our country is a mess.

    I'm sure self-centeredness, morality, ethics, and an entitlement mentality have nothing to do with the rising crime rate. Our country is changing and it is not for the good.

     


    *ROLLS EYES* You've just blamed everything every old fart has blamed on "the kids these days" since the Pyramids were built.

    Every generation is spoiled, lazy, and morally depraved according to the one before. You can find Graffiti on one a few of the large slabs on the Sphinx to back me up on that.

    But in actuality, crime overall is down, as long as you ignore that which is systemic and being done by "people who are well and truly fed." We'd talked a long time in this country about the "land of opportunity" and I suppose kids just bought into the idea that they could make a good living. I don't think that's spoiled -- that's just getting played for suckers.
  • Reply 94 of 102
    How about a return to cutting off the hand that takes from another. THAT will reduce crime.
  • Reply 95 of 102
    joshajosha Posts: 901member


    I suspect Bloomberg is not happy with Apple


      because his namesake company didn't predict Apple great stock performance.


     


    People get an ugly protective (Otter like) case for your iPhone.


     


    Carriers, quickly disable and erase the stolen iPhone, so they are useless.


    Apple, have iTunes disable the IOS and erase the data on stolen iPhones.


    Then stolen iPhones are useless, game over!  image

  • Reply 96 of 102
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    josha wrote: »
    I suspect Bloomberg is not happy with Apple
      because his namesake company didn't predict Apple great stock performance.

    People get an ugly protective (Otter like) case for your iPhone.

    Carriers, quickly disable and erase the stolen iPhone, so they are useless.
    Apple, have iTunes disable the IOS and erase the data on stolen iPhones.
    Then stolen iPhones are useless, game over!  :)

    That's only true if you could get every other country to disable stolen phones, too. Unfortunately, many phone stolen in the US end up in other countries. I suspect (but don't know for sure) that there is some organization coordinating it.
  • Reply 97 of 102


    Originally Posted by jragosta View Post

    I suspect (but don't know for sure) that there is some organization coordinating it.


     


    Samsung. image

  • Reply 98 of 102
    jlanddjlandd Posts: 873member


    Dunno about real statistics, but I've only had two crimes committed against me in the past 25 years in NYC/Brooklyn, and they both were in the past two and involving an Apple product.

  • Reply 99 of 102
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    jlandd wrote: »
    Dunno about real statistics, but I've only had two crimes committed against me in the past 25 years in NYC/Brooklyn, and they both were in the past two and involving an Apple product.

    What were the circumstances of these events? Public transportation? Home invasion? Forgot your iPhone for a couple minutes? Home robbery? Left iPad on side of the street with "Homeless please help" scrolling across its display with a cup sitting next to it?
  • Reply 100 of 102
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by paxman View Post

    I see a sales opportunity for cases and skins that make your iOS device look like an android device.

     

    LOL.

    In the case of the Galaxy S -- just make it look more plastic, should pass as is.
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