Service for pirating iOS apps abruptly closes, cites 'stagnant' community

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  • Reply 61 of 89
    Well we have finnaly reached a time for jail breaking to be dying.
    capoeira4u wrote: »
    I don't steal apps, but I'll stop jailbreaking the day Apple decides to put system shortcut (ex. wifi, bluetooth, airplane mode) onto their Notification Center.
    This has been something I have wondered for a while about a second page in notification center with a few main controls. Of course this could be called notification center/ main controls or mini settings. But for a while now it could be in multi tasking. Double click (hopefully due to now 4 inch screen a double row) with it next to the volume, brightness and other controls like Bluetooth. I was surprised at it how there is no shortcut controls to settings by IOS 5, but 6 has past with little showing it coming(do not disturb might be part of it if it comes) but we will see).
  • Reply 62 of 89
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,162member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by LordJohnWhorfin View Post



    That would be me... Untethered jailbreak is not available for my phone. That means I would lose My3G (which gives me FaceTime over 3G on my grandfathered unlimited AT&T account), MyWi (USB, bluetooth and WiFi tethering), SBSettings (instant access to settings), TruPrint (printing to non-AirPrint printers) and a bunch of other Cydia apps -- which I all paid for.


    So you remain forever frozen in time as technology passes you by. Stuck forever on iOS 5 and whichever iPhone or iPad you have. Or just move to the gloriously open platform and repurchase all of those apps you paid for.

  • Reply 63 of 89
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member


    Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post

    Sort of an academic argument now wouldn't you say since hackers have all but admitted that iOS 6.0.x going forward will be impossible to jailbreak. No untethered jailbreak exists even today for iOS 6. 


     


    Indeed. While this new ruling applies primarily to the Android crowd (who, in addition to being thieves, are now performing FURTHER illegal acts by "enjoying their platform to its "fullest""), the "you can't unlock anymore" is bull frigging crap. It's quite apparent the telecoms paid someone off to do that.

  • Reply 64 of 89
    macslutmacslut Posts: 514member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rayz View Post





    The average iOS developer expects his customers to run the latest version of his software on a recent build of iOS. If he has to support multiple versions of the software then his job becomes an order of magnitude more difficult.

    People seem to forget that the average iOS user is not a geek; running old versions of code is not something they do. As soon as they receive a notification they update.

    Multiple version support would make things needlessly complicated for everyone.


     


    You've misunderstood the proposal.  A developer would have to do nothing.  The proposal isn't that an app would have listed iOS versions 1.x, 2.x, 3.x... 6.x; but rather the previous versions of that app would still be available, and their respective pages would be viewable.


     


    Here's an example.  Let's say we have an app called VersEx and we had released version 1.0 and it required iOS 5.x.  Then when iOS 6.x came out, we made a bunch of modifications to VersEx and upgraded it to 2.0 which requires iOS 6.x.  Well, that would kind of suck for the 45% of users who don't have iOS 6.x because they can't upgrade or don't want to upgrade.  As a developer, you can't do anything about it other than release the different versions of the apps under different titles (which has negative repercussions). 


     


    Under what I proposed, the developer would have to do nothing.  The consumer could do nothing if they were running iOS 6, and just get the latest version.  However, someone running iOS 5.x, for whatever reason, could still purchase and install version 1.0 of VersEx.


     


    Suppose version 1.0 and 2.0 of VersEx ran on iOS 4.x through 6.x.  Again, developers and consumers could still do what they do today if they want.  However, if someone is unhappy with version 2.0 of the app for whatever reason, they could downgrade to version 1.0.  Likewise, people would be able to view each version page to see how well maintained an app is before buying.


     


    The bottom line is that if you're against the proposal for whatever reason, don't worry, you'd never be affected by it, whether you're a user or developer.

  • Reply 65 of 89
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    lkrupp wrote: »
    You are 100% correct. Their arguments about having control over the device they "own" , wanting to "demo" an app before purchasing, and all the other so-called rationales for jailbreaking are simply smoke screens. The real reason is to steal.

    Not always true.

    As I stated earlier in this thread, jailbreaking was the only way I could get my iPhone to work on StraightTalk when using earlier versions of iOS. Some people are having trouble with iOS 6 and need to jailbreak, as well, in order to use Straight Talk.

    My phone was out of contract and AT&T unlocked it, but it still required jailbreaking to work. I would say that's a pretty good reason.

    And, no, I didn't pirate or steal any apps.
  • Reply 66 of 89
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    jragosta wrote: »
    Not always true.
    As I stated earlier in this thread, jailbreaking was the only way I could get my iPhone to work on StraightTalk when using earlier versions of iOS. Some people are having trouble with iOS 6 and need to jailbreak, as well, in order to use Straight Talk.
    My phone was out of contract and AT&T unlocked it, but it still required jailbreaking to work. I would say that's a pretty good reason.
    And, no, I didn't pirate or steal any apps.

    It's not ever true as stated. For it to be true every jailbreaker's goal must be to steal apps. Since there a plethora of paid and free apps on Cydia that allow functionality that is well beyond what Apple offers one can't reasonable claim that "the real reason is to steal all the utilities and apps "are simply smoke screens" unless one want to argue that these developers are making (and selling) these app and utilities as some sort of circuitous plan to fool Apple.
  • Reply 67 of 89
    lightknightlightknight Posts: 2,312member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by emig647 View Post



    Well I'm an a$$hole then. I've done it and am proud of it. Know why? Odds are I've paid for more apps than most. There isn't a demo system with iOS. You have to blindly purchase apps. Some devs put out free versions, and I applaud them. I never pirate if there is a demoable version of sorts. There are many in my group that are the same way.

    Either way, IMO, the scene has died down a ton since iOS 6. That's fine and not a big deal. Just wish we could get demos and ad versions easily.

    Btw, I'm also a developer which is how I learned about these methods.




    You don't get to see the beginning of the movie when you go to the cinema (and trailers, well those are the equivalent of the screenshots in the AppStore). I expect you won't pretend that you first pirate and then go and pay for the movie?


     


    The problem is with curation. I've seen too many disgruntled friends (or their younger brothers, mostly) who bought stupid apps (like those ridiculous squeletal scanners or other "magical" apps that actually do nothing, or very little). You can't get a refund on that and in my opinion they should NOT have ever been approved. To my opinion, curation only protects people from viruses and pornography/political dissent. (Of course, if you're like me among those who think the latter should be a free choice -- freedom of speech, political opinion, religion etc, it's a minus...) However, curation should protect you from those "shame-apps".


     


    I don't pirate, I think those who do it are a$$holes, and I also think Apple is wrong applying curation to politics and pornography, but not to "shame-apps", even though their terms&conditions actually pretend they do.


     


    For those who doubt the existence of those shame-apps, go to the AppStore, in LifeStyle or Fun... 


    Good point for Apple though, the situation seems to have massively improved over the last two years, I expect they were aware of the annoyance to users and did part of what has to be done.

  • Reply 68 of 89
    lightknightlightknight Posts: 2,312member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post





    It's not ever true as stated. For it to be true every jailbreaker's goal must be to steal apps. Since there a plethora of paid and free apps on Cydia that allow functionality that is well beyond what Apple offers one can't reasonable claim that "the real reason is to steal all the utilities and apps "are simply smoke screens" unless one want to argue that these developers are making (and selling) these app and utilities as some sort of circuitous plan to fool Apple.




    IMHO, that's why people should stop pirating and dissing Android: you want freedom of modding your system: use Android. You want a secure, safe, highly controlled and curated system where all choices are dictated by designers, go iPhone. Hence, it's not wise to jailbreak.


     


     


    Obviously, I'm just stating my opinion, not pretending my opinion is a universal rule, and if you want to jailbreak it's your problem, not mine ^^

  • Reply 69 of 89
    lightknightlightknight Posts: 2,312member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post In my opinion, the Android crowd in addition to being thieves, are now performing FURTHER illegal acts.


    Fixed it for you.

  • Reply 70 of 89
    sr2012sr2012 Posts: 896member
    Indeed. While this new ruling applies primarily to the Android crowd (who, in addition to being thieves, are now performing FURTHER illegal acts by "enjoying their platform to its "fullest""), the "you can't unlock anymore" is bull frigging crap. It's quite apparent the telecoms paid someone off to do that.

    Curious, what are those illegal acts? I would like to compare them to what I've done.
  • Reply 71 of 89
    techboytechboy Posts: 183member
    A simpler explanation could be jailbreak iOS users are finally coming to terms with paying for most apps that ranges from $1-$5. Besides, each day there are so many free app promotes....it renders hacking for free apps plain silly. iOS app store has finally grow to a level where apps need to start with free promotes to gain reviews from its users. I think we are finally seeing a health competitive business app model at work here.
  • Reply 72 of 89
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 4,637member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jragosta View Post





    This is misleading. You can demo a car - IF THE DEALER ALLOWS YOU TO. You can try a physical product and then return it if you don't like it IF THE RETAILER ALLOWS YOU TO.

    You don't get to arbitrarily define the terms of the deal. IF the seller doesn't allow you to try it before you buy, then you have no right to just take it without permission - whether it's a physical product or software.

    If there's software that you want to try before you buy it, talk to the developer. Ask them to make a demo version. Or read the reviews. Or ask someone who owns it. Taking it without permission is not an acceptable solution.


    jragosta, you are obviously are not aware of most states consumer laws which to allow people to buy things and return them within a certain period of time at no cost to the consumer. In my state they that is 3 days including a car and a house. people are allowed 3 days to terminate a purchase contract. Even is the dealer does not allow you to demo a car it is not in their best interest since it more costly to have them leave with a car and return it in 3 days at that point it is a used car and can not be sold new.


     


    The same goes for software, and the problem is caused by the all the apps which cost $0.99 at the price developers do not feel they need to provide a return path. Also reading most review is worthless since most people complain just to complain, they do not provide any sort of worthless review. 


     


    If consumers wanted to fight back they could since most states have consumer protections which allowed them to return what they bough and at it will take is one class action law suite from a state with good consumer protections to force developers to take returns or apple to change the model. I would recommend that Apple change since we all know what happens when lawyers and the government gets involved. 

  • Reply 73 of 89


    Originally Posted by sr2012 View Post

    Curious, what are those illegal acts? I would like to compare them to what I've done.


     


    Rooting, for one. It's illegal now.






    Originally Posted by Techboy View Post

    A simpler explanation could be jailbreak iOS users are finally coming to terms with paying for most apps that ranges from $1-$5. Besides, each day there are so many free app promotes....it renders hacking for free apps plain silly. 


     



    There will always be idiots.






    iOS app store has finally grow to a level where apps need to start with free promotes to gain reviews from its users. I think we are finally seeing a health competitive business app model at work here.



     


    And that wasn't the case before? Why is 600,000 apps different from 100,000? Or even 60,000?

  • Reply 74 of 89
    reefoidreefoid Posts: 158member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


     


    Rooting, for one. It's illegal now.



    Only in the US as far as I'm aware, here in the UK and Europe its perfectly legal to jailbreak/root a device you own.


     


    As has been mentioned in these forums many times, thankfully the rest of the world is not governed by US laws.

  • Reply 75 of 89
    sr2012sr2012 Posts: 896member
    Rooting, for one. It's illegal now.

    Nope, still legal, even in the United States Of Freedom (apparently not for tablets though)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Android_rooting#Legality

    As far as I can tell in Australia there is no law against what I've done with my Android devices.
  • Reply 76 of 89
    lightknightlightknight Posts: 2,312member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


     


    Nope. Unless they've changed something in the last two years.




    EDIT: Hey. They changed something in the last two years.


     


    I don't often say this but, uh, screw the law here. 


     


    Yeah, I don't care. I think I'll rejailbreak my iPad, for the first time in about two years, just because.


     


    Talk about out of touch. They obviously don't have cell phones.



    WTF. I'm quite amazed at the United States here. Isn't it supposed to be the country of freedom and all?

  • Reply 77 of 89


    Originally Posted by sr2012 View Post

    Nope, still legal, even in the United States Of Freedom (apparently not for tablets though)




    Then I don't see how jailbreaking would be illegal.

  • Reply 78 of 89
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,448member
    sr2012 wrote: »
    Rooting, for one. It's illegal now.

    Nope, still legal, even in the United States Of Freedom (apparently not for tablets though)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Android_rooting#Legality

    That's from 2012-11-06 and actually doesn't say anything about the legal implications, only on the warranty.
  • Reply 79 of 89
    sr2012sr2012 Posts: 896member

    Then I don't see how jailbreaking would be illegal.

    Yup, jailbreaking iOS as far as I know is not illegal. But jailbreaking iOS and rooting Android is ~illegal~ in the USA for tablets. That's my current understanding based on that Wikipedia link I provided.
  • Reply 80 of 89


    Originally Posted by sr2012 View Post

    Yup, jailbreaking iOS as far as I know is not illegal. But jailbreaking iOS and rooting Android is ~illegal~ in the USA for tablets.


     


    So just tablets… well, why did it matter on phones, and how do tablets differ? Operationally it's the same. The OS modification purpose hasn't changed. The only meaningfully illegalized thing is unlocking… 

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