Service for pirating iOS apps abruptly closes, cites 'stagnant' community

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  • Reply 41 of 89
    hmmhmm Posts: 3,405member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by gopiballava View Post





    I'm a developer. I disagree. There actually aren't any *good* options.

    If you have two versions of the app, free and paid, then you get people writing reviews for only one. The free version will mainly get bad reviews in many cases since the people who didn't like it review it. Searches will sometimes produce the wrong version. People may not notice the free version.

    In app purchase gets lots of annoyed complaints about how the app price is misleading and it really isn't free.


    I've noticed a lot of game developers go the route of a free or cheap app with content in the form of customizations that can be purchased. Apple likes cheap apps. They make their money primarily off hardware sales. Their breakdowns show this.


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by wizard69 View Post







    Frankly nobody wants ad versions except for Google. Everyone that I've had ends up being a mess to use because of the ad system. It is far better to gamble a dollar or even ten on the unknown app, then it is to deal with ad supported software.


    Didn't google actually mention that the majority of their mobile profits come from in app advertising?

  • Reply 42 of 89


    Originally Posted by coolfactor View Post

    You have "Administrator" next to your handle, but the above statement contradicts that. I make a living off of making software. I have my own software company.


     


    Dang, do we really need a sticky thread that explains what ¡ means?


     


    I'm gonna consider it, given the number of users that use it now instead of "/s" (which I've never liked).

  • Reply 43 of 89
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    Dang, do we really need a sticky thread that explains what ¡ means?

    I'm gonna consider it, given the number of users that use it now instead of "/s" (which I've never liked).

    I think we've lost this one.
  • Reply 44 of 89
    I don't steal apps, but I'll stop jailbreaking the day Apple decides to put system shortcut (ex. wifi, bluetooth, airplane mode) onto their Notification Center.
  • Reply 45 of 89


    Originally Posted by capoeira4u View Post

    I don't steal apps, but I'll stop jailbreaking the day Apple decides to put system shortcut (ex. wifi, bluetooth, airplane mode) onto their Notification Center.


     


    I'm trying to wrap my head around someone that uses sub-iOS 6 by choice.

  • Reply 46 of 89
    That would be me... Untethered jailbreak is not available for my phone. That means I would lose My3G (which gives me FaceTime over 3G on my grandfathered unlimited AT&T account), MyWi (USB, bluetooth and WiFi tethering), SBSettings (instant access to settings), TruPrint (printing to non-AirPrint printers) and a bunch of other Cydia apps -- which I all paid for.
  • Reply 47 of 89
    reefoidreefoid Posts: 158member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post


    I've been buying software since computers first existed and the number of times I could try it before I bought it I could count on zero fingers.  "Try before you buy" has never been the case with most things that you buy.  It's never been the case with movies or records or TV shows or software of any kind in my experience.  I'm sure you might come up with the odd case where this has happened, but by far the majority of software is sold sealed, as is, and non-returnable.  The only exception I can think of is one of those horrible games stores (thankfully disappearing lately), that buy and sell second hand game cartridges.



     


    Really?  Maybe you haven't noticed, but nearly all major software houses offer trial versions of their software, including Apple.


     


    Adobe


    Apple


    Microsoft


    Propellerheads


    Plus Xbox and PS3 demos


     


    I could go on and on.  So in fact, its been fairly standard for years to offer trial versions of software.  The 15 minute refund window is definitely one of the advantages Google Play has over the App Store.  Yes, apps cost a fraction of the price of major software, but that's irrelevant.  The fact is this is a fairly standard business model that Apple choose not to follow for iOS.

  • Reply 48 of 89
    rayzrayz Posts: 814member
    macslut wrote: »
    Additionally, it would be nice for Apple to allow multiple versions of an app.  The app would only be listed once in the store (and through all directories and searches), but when you're on the app page, you should be allowed to have the version number as a pull-down list that you can go to and select previous versions.  This would allow you to still buy older versions of apps for older iOS devices.  You'd also be able to see the version history this way and determine whether or not the app is being adequately developed over time.  Each version would have its own page to go with it, along with comments and reviews.  Anyone not interested in the Version feature would not be impacted at all since the default version is always the latest and everything is unchanged from how it is now, unless the user clicks on the version number.

    The average iOS developer expects his customers to run the latest version of his software on a recent build of iOS. If he has to support multiple versions of the software then his job becomes an order of magnitude more difficult.
    People seem to forget that the average iOS user is not a geek; running old versions of code is not something they do. As soon as they receive a notification they update.

    Multiple version support would make things needlessly complicated for everyone.
  • Reply 49 of 89
    sr2012sr2012 Posts: 896member
    olivierl wrote: »
    Easy explanation: the sites owners got a new iPhone5 and since those are not jailbreaked, they could not side load applications on their iPhone5, hence abandonned the jailbreak community.

    Indeed. Also, with the rise of Android 4, I would wager a lot of people, like myself, that were into the jailbreak community, moved to Android.

    Note this is not a statement if there are more or less iOS vs Android pirates. I am simply talking about jailbreaking here.
    reefoid wrote: »
    Really? Maybe you haven't noticed, but nearly all major software houses offer trial versions of their software, including Apple.

    Adobe
    Apple
    Microsoft
    Propellerheads
    Plus Xbox and PS3 demos

    I could go on and on. So in fact, its been fairly standard for years to offer trial versions of software. The 15 minute refund window is definitely one of the advantages Google Play has over the App Store. Yes, apps cost a fraction of the price of major software, but that's irrelevant. The fact is this is a fairly standard business model that Apple choose not to follow for iOS.

    The refund system is new to me, being new to Android. I have not yet even begun to explore it. I would say that the Google Play Store does have some things going for it, including good search tools, ability to find well-rated apps with a lot of customer feedback quickly, and this refund thing which, having previously been so into iOS, I have been blind to.
  • Reply 50 of 89
    stniukstniuk Posts: 90member
    I think the low price of the apps is doing more to kill piracy than anything. At 69p for some pretty good games why bother?
  • Reply 51 of 89
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,949member
    I think it's telling that so few have heard of the site.

    gazoobee wrote: »
    This is a pretty lame argument if you ask me.  You're trying to make out (without really saying it explicitly), that "try before you buy" is a common thing in many other industries when it clearly isn't.  In particular, you get to try out a car before you buy it because it costs tens of thousands of dollars.  You don't get to try an app before you buy it because it only costs a couple of bucks.  

    Generally, yes, but did you miss his personal example of the $100 Tom Tom app? Productivity apps often cost $20 and up. I don't condone the behavior, but in a few cases, I do understand it.

    I'm trying to wrap my head around someone that uses sub-iOS 6 by choice.

    Given the #1 legitimate reason to do so went away a week or two ago.

    sr2012 wrote: »
    Indeed. Also, with the rise of Android 4, I would wager a lot of people, like myself, that were into the jailbreak community, moved to Android.
    Note this is not a statement if there are more or less iOS vs Android pirates. I am simply talking about jailbreaking here.
    The refund system is new to me, being new to Android. I have not yet even begun to explore it. I would say that the Google Play Store does have some things going for it, including good search tools, ability to find well-rated apps with a lot of customer feedback quickly, and this refund thing which, having previously been so into iOS, I have been blind to.

    I've heard about a refund system last year. Is it really new to Android, or did they fix it? The easy way to get free apps through the refund system was cited as a problem in developing apps profitable.
  • Reply 52 of 89
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,164member
    As I understand it jailbreaking depends on exploiting flaws in iOS. Apple has been forced to work diligently to lock those back doors and for that I commend the jailbreaking community. The fact that some of the so-called best minds in the hacker world have come up empty on iOS 6 is really great news for iOS users in that iOS is now more bullet proof then ever.
  • Reply 53 of 89
    4phun4phun Posts: 51member
    There is one serious error in this post.

    JAILBREAKING OR ROOTING ANY NEW PHONE OR TABLET IS ILLEGAL AS OF JAN 1, 2013.

    There are no exceptions to this US law and anyone who claims otherwise is going to suffer if they choose to defy our lawmakers.

    As a matter of fact jail braking any tablet has always been illegal.

    Little details like that seem to have escaped the notice of the younger generation. There is a famous saying, "Young and Dumb!"

    It is not a coincidence that the "Hackulous" website and "Apptracker" shut down Jan 30, 2012. Apple had nothing to do with it.

    Those with a lot to loose and who now face harsh penalties simply chose to run before they were nailed and jailed.





  • Reply 54 of 89


    Originally Posted by 4phun View Post

    JAILBREAKING OR ROOTING ANY NEW PHONE OR TABLET IS ILLEGAL AS OF JAN 1, 2013.

    As a matter of fact jail braking any tablet has always been illegal.


     


    Nope. Unless they've changed something in the last two years.




    EDIT: Hey. They changed something in the last two years.


     


    I don't often say this but, uh, screw the law here. 






    fair use rules no longer apply to a handset's OS.



     


    Yeah, I don't care. I think I'll rejailbreak my iPad, for the first time in about two years, just because.






    the exception isn't needed anymore because carrier rules regarding unlocking are now more liberal



     


    Talk about out of touch. They obviously don't have cell phones.

  • Reply 55 of 89
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,164member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Apple ][ View Post


    Good riddance.


     


    As I've stated many times in the past, I still say that most people who jailbreak are losers and thieves, regardless of what some might claim. 


     


    If you can't afford to purchase 99 cent apps, then go buy a shitty Android phone, you low class moron. 



     


    You are 100% correct. Their arguments about having control over the device they "own" , wanting to "demo" an app before purchasing, and all the other so-called rationales for jailbreaking are simply smoke screens. The real reason is to steal. It's why to this day you cannot return a movie DVD for a refund. You can exchange a defective disc but that's all. It's the reason that DVD ripping software exists, not the stated excuse that someone wants to "backup" their collections.


     


    Even myself , a bastion of moral virtue <extreme sarcasm here>, have succumbed in the past to renting a DVD and then ripping it to a hard drive. But my 1950's RomanCatholic upbringing (brainwashing?) made the guilt too much to bear. image

  • Reply 56 of 89
    4phun4phun Posts: 51member


    Let me guess, you are young?


     


    Yes they have clearly changed the law again and you missed it.


     


    There is no reason for the rooting (jailbreaking) that Congress temporarily allowed solely do to the non competitive cellular structure in the USA.


    This provision allowed you to move among cellular companies who sold the same type of technology you had in your phone.


    Now that everyone has moved to 4G and LTE no one can claim they are locked into one carrier.


    In Sept 2012 it was made quite clear the exception is over as of January 2013.


     


    Tablets and other digital devices were never included by Congress in the original jailbreak ruling.

  • Reply 57 of 89


    Originally Posted by 4phun View Post

    There is no reason for the rooting (jailbreaking) that Congress temporarily allowed solely due to the non competitive cellular structure in the USA.


     


    Why? Your reason is what?





    Now that everyone has moved to 4G and LTE no one can claim they are locked into one carrier.



     


    Except they quite plainly are, in every instance, on every carrier.

  • Reply 58 of 89
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    gazoobee wrote: »
    This is a pretty lame argument if you ask me.  You're trying to make out (without really saying it explicitly), that "try before you buy" is a common thing in many other industries when it clearly isn't.  In particular, you get to try out a car before you buy it because it costs tens of thousands of dollars.  You don't get to try an app before you buy it because it only costs a couple of bucks.  

    I've been buying software since computers first existed and the number of times I could try it before I bought it I could count on zero fingers.  "Try before you buy" has never been the case with most things that you buy.  It's never been the case with movies or records or TV shows or software of any kind in my experience.  I'm sure you might come up with the odd case where this has happened, but by far the majority of software is sold sealed, as is, and non-returnable.  The only exception I can think of is one of those horrible games stores (thankfully disappearing lately), that buy and sell second hand game cartridges.  

    This recent idea that Apple "needs" to have a try before you buy system is just a meme that lacks any kind of factual basis or proof that it would do anything at all.  Importantly, it's a meme which originates with the people doing the stealing.  It's like their credo or something.  

    It's closer to a popular misconception than any kind of fact or desirable outcome.  There is nothing at all that I have read or heard that would indicate to me that it would have any affect on theft at all.  I don't think anyone has even done the due diligence to look into the pros and cons of such a scheme, it's just accepted as "the answer" by the tech media without any real examination of the idea at all.  In other words it's a myth.  

    I put it in the same category as those that say iPhone "needs" a bigger screen to compete, that OS X "needs" to go after to corporate users, and that Apple "needs" to make an x-Mac mini-tower computer.  
    All myth.  All bullshit IMO. 


    In the last 5 weeks (since Black Friday, to be accurate) these are the apps I can remember being interested in...

    • 1Password for Windows — Free trial back in October. Bought in November on Black Friday. Happy purchase that wouldn't have happened if not for the trial. Regular price $50, bought it for $25. At $50 it wouldn't have been worth it to me, but at $25 it was. If not for the trial I would have continued using the free LastPass on my Windows servers.
    • iVI — A great app for easily finding the appropriate metadata for your Movies and TV shows, updating it appropriately for iTunes, and adding it to iTunes. If it needs to be converted it does that, too. if the container and codec is compatible you can simply update the metadata Info, including the embedded image of the TV Show or Movie. A huge time saver. There is another great feature that if the codecs are completely compatible but the container is not it will only replace the container leaving the data along. This app only costs $10 but there website looks like it be a scam site and these apps never seem to work as well as advertised. They offer a trial version. It was well worth the $10. I would have pay as much as $50 for this app.
    • iStat Menus — I have been using iStat Menus for years. Love that my Menu Bar can have a utilitarian use that allows me to quickly see how my system is performing at a glance. I'm on iStat Menus 3. The newly released iStat Menus 4 is a paid upgrade. The cost is $16 but there was a 14 day trial option. I tried. I didn't see one thing that made me want to get the new version. Replaced it with my licensed version 3 app.
    • 1Password 4 on iOS — I have the previous version for my iPad and iPhone. Don't recall how much I paid. It works well, I would like the new version but I have doubts that $8 is worth just getting what appear to be a few UI changes. If there were new iOS APIs that allowed 1Password to integrate better with the system that would likely push me over the edge, but from what can I see there is nothing in that's worth $8. Could I be very wrong about that? Absolutely! But without a trial version I'll likely never know.
  • Reply 59 of 89
    evilutionevilution Posts: 1,364member


    http://www.dslreports.com/shownews/DMCA-Gets-Dumber-Smartphone-JailBreaking-Illegal-in-2013-121800


     


    Illegal to now jailbreak any tablet.


    Illegal to jailbreak any phone bought after Jan 1, 2013.


     


    Also now illegal to "modify" your games console or to make copies of DVDs you own!


     


    Who the hell just took the reigns at the DMCA! 

  • Reply 60 of 89
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,164member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Evilution View Post


    http://www.dslreports.com/shownews/DMCA-Gets-Dumber-Smartphone-JailBreaking-Illegal-in-2013-121800


     


    Illegal to now jailbreak any tablet.


    Illegal to jailbreak any phone bought after Jan 1, 2013.


     


    Also now illegal to "modify" your games console or to make copies of DVDs you own!


     


    Who the hell just took the reigns at the DMCA! 



     


    Sort of an academic argument now wouldn't you say since hackers have all but admitted that iOS 6.0.x going forward will be impossible to jailbreak. No untethered jailbreak exists even today for iOS 6. 

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