After 'astonishingly' poor quarter, Mac sales predicted to rebound

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Comments

  • Reply 61 of 119
    robmrobm Posts: 1,068member


    Bang on the nail Slurpy !


    Well said. +1

  • Reply 62 of 119
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by ankleskater View Post


     


    Very interesting hypothesis. The other possibility (or a complementary scenario) is that they stopped ordering parts for the old iMac prematurely and, once having failed to build enough new ones for the launch, also didn't have the parts inventory or capacity to build the old ones instead. One thing seems likely - they had an inking (if not confirmation) of this problem when the new iMac was announced. But they went ahead because the train had already left the station.


     


    FWS (friction-stir welding and not stir-friction welding, notwithstanding what this article says) is not used in many high volume applications. I wonder if the root of the problem is as simple as equipment supply.


     


    Regardless, your core premise is likely correct - FSW will be used in other Apple products.


     


    p.s. According to this (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/11/20/imac_welding_british_company/), Apple only licensed the FSW technology from its inventor (TWI) in early 2012. If so, that's a short time to ramp up to high volume production.



    So I guess we should be blaming Jony Ive and his new obsession friction stir welding. image

  • Reply 63 of 119
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by RobM View Post


    Bang on the nail Slurpy !


    Well said. +1



    But I do think Apple could do something to try and reverse the negative sentiment out there.  Especially if its likely we're not going to see any new product until June (WWDC).  The perception out there is the magic is gone without Steve, Apple isn't innovating anymore, Google and others are catching up to it in design (I just read an article today from a long time Mac user heaping praise on Chromebook Pixel and saying the trackpad is better than the MacBook trackpads).


     


    It burns me up inside that Apple's approach is basically to sit there and take all the abuse and not fight back.  Why not let some of the SVP's schmooze the tech press like Google has been doing.  Give the Verge or some other friendly tech site an exclusive with Jony Ive or Bob Mansfield.  You don't have to reveal specific product plans.  It would just be a way to get some favorable PR and show off the leadership team.  And maybe start to chip away at this meme that Apple = Steve Jobs, every product was dreamed up by him and without him Apple is screwed. Seems to me Apple could be doing a better job of countering the negative sentiment.  Maybe that means being a little more open rather than doubling down on secrecy in Cupertino only to have the web full of rumors and leaks coming from Asia.

  • Reply 64 of 119

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by ElectroTech View Post



    "after 25 years of Mac only use, I am buying a couple desktop PC's running Win7. No Mac Pro makes me sad, and an iMac is just a vertical laptop."



    @xzu With the statements you made, there is no way that you were a Mac user for any time. You sound like a hard core Windows box user and may have used a Mac for half an hour. You just don't 'get' Macs if you put down the iMac as a vertical laptop. Powerful computers are made with powerful processors and graphics chips regardless of the shape of the box.


     


    To be fair, I'm in the same boat as ElectroTech. I have used Macs since the bad old Mid-90's, rid out OS 7.5, 7,6, 8, 9 and the early versions of OS X until things got really good. And I evangelized the Mac the whole time. And despite that, I decided to downsize too, get a gaming PC and a Mac Mini with it. It doesn't please me, but the 21" iMac is now not much more then a good quality laptop in a less movable box. it's gorgeous and if it fits your needs, that's fantastic. But no discrete card, no upgradeable RAM? And to get that upgradeable RAM you have to start at 1800 dollars. I built the base of my gaming PC for 350 dollars, and added on a gorgeous 24" matte screen monitor that fits my space and a graphics card that destroys the one in the 2000$ 27" for 400 more. Is it elegant? No. God I hate Windows 8 too. But given the choice, I'd rather do what I want to do with a machine I dislike then have an iMac I know I'm going to be replacing in 2-3 years at a cost way too high.


     


    The bottom line is Apple made a choice with the current iMac. It dropped the people who like upgradeable RAM and a good discrete card for the 21" in favor of getting more sleek-and-slim buyers. I'm 100% sure Apple made the right call for them. It just happens I landed outside. I hope one day they decide to make the headless iMac with a real card and RAM slots. I Hope one day Mac minis get external graphics card boxes so I can use that and my choice of PCI-E graphics cards. Until it does though, I'm stuck as-is. 

  • Reply 65 of 119
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 6,447member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post


    But I do think Apple could do something to try and reverse the negative sentiment out there.  Especially if its likely we're not going to see any new product until June (WWDC).  The perception out there is the magic is gone without Steve, Apple isn't innovating anymore, Google and others are catching up to it in design (I just read an article today from a long time Mac user heaping praise on Chromebook Pixel and saying the trackpad is better than the MacBook trackpads).


     


    It burns me up inside that Apple's approach is basically to sit there and take all the abuse and not fight back.  Why not let some of the SVP's schmooze the tech press like Google has been doing.  Give the Verge or some other friendly tech site an exclusive with Jony Ive or Bob Mansfield.  You don't have to reveal specific product plans.  It would just be a way to get some favorable PR and show off the leadership team.  And maybe start to chip away at this meme that Apple = Steve Jobs, every product was dreamed up by him and without him Apple is screwed. Seems to me Apple could be doing a better job of countering the negative sentiment.  Maybe that means being a little more open rather than doubling down on secrecy in Cupertino only to have the web full of rumors and leaks coming from Asia.



     


    What would Jony or Bob say in an interview that would lead to favorable PR? We all know they won't say peep about future endeavors to any degree, we know what they usually have to say which are largely platitudes about Apple's philosophy and products, which are all pretty boilerplate at this point. I honestly don't know that I'm getting much less out of the recent interviews with Cook that we would've gotten out of Jobs (Businessweek feature or Brian Williams interview), or that throwing Eddie Cue or Ive in would add much to most peoples' perceptions of Apple's executive team.


     


    I'd honestly rather they ignore all of the noise as much as possible and focus on what they're doing, which is churning out gazillions of high quality products and, despite what the mainstream media and bottom-feeding bloggers would have you believe, working on the Next Big Things, whatever those may be. It's absolutely ludicrous to think that anyone who understands how Apple works would believe any of this tripe suggesting Apple is sitting on its thumbs waiting for someone else to copy or catch up to. I don't need them to show proof-of-concept demoware like Google (hey what happened to the Nexus Q anyway?). It may take longer than we all want for the next huge market disruption to come, but if I had to place my bets on where it was going to come from (and I have) I'm going with Apple. 


     


    "Don't bet against us" - Tim Cook

  • Reply 66 of 119
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,926member
    But given the choice, I'd rather do what I want to do with a machine I dislike then have an iMac I know I'm going to be replacing in 2-3 years at a cost way too high.

    2-3 years? Why do you need to replace it in that short time period?
  • Reply 67 of 119
    robmrobm Posts: 1,068member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post


    But I do think Apple could do something to try and reverse the negative sentiment out there.  Especially if its likely we're not going to see any new product until June (WWDC).  The perception out there is the magic is gone without Steve, Apple isn't innovating anymore, Google and others are catching up to it in design (I just read an article today from a long time Mac user heaping praise on Chromebook Pixel and saying the trackpad is better than the MacBook trackpads).


     


    It burns me up inside that Apple's approach is basically to sit there and take all the abuse and not fight back.  Why not let some of the SVP's schmooze the tech press like Google has been doing.  Give the Verge or some other friendly tech site an exclusive with Jony Ive or Bob Mansfield.  You don't have to reveal specific product plans.  It would just be a way to get some favorable PR and show off the leadership team.  And maybe start to chip away at this meme that Apple = Steve Jobs, every product was dreamed up by him and without him Apple is screwed. Seems to me Apple could be doing a better job of countering the negative sentiment.  Maybe that means being a little more open rather than doubling down on secrecy in Cupertino only to have the web full of rumors and leaks coming from Asia.



    What fastasleep ^ said.


    You can't win playing counter spin when you go down that road.


    I do agree that Apples secrecy has made it real easy for rumours to swirl - but that said I think Apple should stick to the knitting and keep developing and marketing great products.


     


    The markets just the market - hell you buy when you think it's low and hope like hell you're right. Sell when you've got enough and try to make some sense of when to buy back in. Jeez, everybody gets caught out sooner or later - ask Einhorn lol. God Ive waited for years for some of my dodgy gold mining stocks to do something. Many of them have folded -  bye bye money. I can wallpaper your house if you want and your mothers and your dogs kennel.


     


    Cue the "but I own a part of the company howls of indignation, it ain't good enough, Cook has to go !" posts

  • Reply 68 of 119

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post


     


    I'm curious, what the hell is it you do that requires a Mac Pro, and not a "vertical laptop" as you call the iMac? The iMac is an very powerful machine, so tell me, what is that you do that an iMac or any other Mac can't handle?



     


    Slurpy, 


     


    I do this http://www.blender.org/development/release-logs/blender-266/ ( Yes, it runs on the Mac ) and I would like to put 2 of these http://www.nvidia.com/titan in it! You can have 2 GPUs working together on CUDA tasks.  If you don't know what CUDA is look here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CUDA also OpenCL will be supported in the future.  If you don't know what OpenCL is look here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenCL


     


    I will be buying the new Mac Pro if it ever comes out!  :-)   

  • Reply 69 of 119
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by fastasleep View Post


     


    What would Jony or Bob say in an interview that would lead to favorable PR? We all know they won't say peep about future endeavors to any degree, we know what they usually have to say which are largely platitudes about Apple's philosophy and products, which are all pretty boilerplate at this point. I honestly don't know that I'm getting much less out of the recent interviews with Cook that we would've gotten out of Jobs (Businessweek feature or Brian Williams interview), or that throwing Eddie Cue or Ive in would add much to most peoples' perceptions of Apple's executive team.


     


    I'd honestly rather they ignore all of the noise as much as possible and focus on what they're doing, which is churning out gazillions of high quality products and, despite what the mainstream media and bottom-feeding bloggers would have you believe, working on the Next Big Things, whatever those may be. It's absolutely ludicrous to think that anyone who understands how Apple works would believe any of this tripe suggesting Apple is sitting on its thumbs waiting for someone else to copy or catch up to. I don't need them to show proof-of-concept demoware like Google (hey what happened to the Nexus Q anyway?). It may take longer than we all want for the next huge market disruption to come, but if I had to place my bets on where it was going to come from (and I have) I'm going with Apple. 


     


    "Don't bet against us" - Tim Cook



    Saw this on Jon Gruber's blog tonight.  A hardware review of Chromebook Pixel.


     


    http://daringfireball.net/


     


    Quote:



    Another great hardware review, this one by Ian Betteridge:


     


    The Pixel makes me feel that Google probably took one look around its own campus at the plethora of Macs people were using, despite all of them mostly using web apps, and wondered why there wasn’t a Chromebook which could tempt its own employees to ChromeOS. The Pixel is the answer to that — and also for people like me, who wants a good quality machine and are happy to pay a premium price for it. […]


     


    But it’s also a statement about Google, too, because it says that Google can do hardware with the same attention to detail and quality that Apple does. It’s not a shot across Apple’s bows, but more putting a flag in the ground that says “Come on Cupertino, we can do hardware — you think you can do services?”


     


    Indeed, the Chromebook Pixel seems like another bit of evidence that Google is getting better at what Apple does best faster than Apple is getting better at what Google does best.




     



    So now Google is equated with Apple in terms of hardware design.  And several weeks ago The Verge ran a feature story aka puff piece on Larry Page's software design revolution at Google.  And a lot of chatter out there is how Google is out-designing Apple in the software space, that the best designed apps on iOS come from Google.


     


    I've no doubt Apple is working on lots of cool shit. But how is being so secretive and closed actually helping them right now?  Especially when you have Samsung spending $12B carpet bombing the world with advertising and Google giving tech sites an early look at Google glass (which in turn generates absurdly positive reviews of Chrombook Pixel).  All we get from Apple is Cook saying the pipeline is chock full of stuff.  But since we get no clues on what that stuff might be its left to rumors from Wall Street analysts -mostly things everyone expects like thinner/lighter 5th gen iPad, retina iPad mini and MacBook airs, updated MacBooks with Haswell, etc. - or things that don't really excite anyone - like a cheaper plastic iPhone for China.


     


    Just because Steve Jobs was obsessed with secrecy doesn't mean Tim Cook has to continue that tradition.  And it's not even working.  There were very few products, if any, that Apple released last year that weren't known ahead of time because of leaks.  4th gen iPad might have been a surprise but that's about it.


     


    Maybe there's nothing Apple can do right now to change the perception out there but I don't think it would hurt to try.  Clearly Tim Cook is not the guy to do it.

  • Reply 70 of 119
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,388member


    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

    And it's not even working.  There were very few products, if any, that Apple released last year that weren't known ahead of time because of leaks.


     


    No one ever knew about any products before launch when Steve Jobs was alive. 






    Clearly Tim Cook is not the guy to do it.



     


    Fine, you do it. You'll take credit when their quarterly 13 billion in profit becomes 13 billion in losses, right?

  • Reply 71 of 119
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,926member

    Quote:


    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post


     


    I've no doubt Apple is working on lots of cool shit. But how is being so secretive and closed actually helping them right now?



     


    i dunno, maybe having the most profitable (unadjusted for inflation) year in corporate history. I'm sure Tim Cook et al. are crying in Apple's $140 billion cash/investments.


     


    Quote:


    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post


     


    Especially when you have Samsung spending $12B carpet bombing the world with advertising and Google giving tech sites an early look at Google glass (which in turn generates absurdly positive reviews of Chrombook Pixel).  All we get from Apple is Cook saying the pipeline is chock full of stuff.  But since we get no clues on what that stuff might be its left to rumors from Wall Street analysts -mostly things everyone expects like thinner/lighter 5th gen iPad, retina iPad mini and MacBook airs, updated MacBooks with Haswell, etc. - or things that don't really excite anyone - like a cheaper plastic iPhone for China.



     


    Rumors have flown since Jobs came back. You can't stop it. If you pre-announce products, WS won't stop creating rumors. Hows' that $12B serving Sammy. The 4S outsold/shipped the GS3. The iphone is #1 and #2. Apple has 70% of the mobile profits. Where's the ROI on Sammy's advertising.


     


    Quote:


    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post


     

    Just because Steve Jobs was obsessed with secrecy doesn't mean Tim Cook has to continue that tradition.  And it's not even working.  There were very few products, if any, that Apple released last year that weren't known ahead of time because of leaks.  4th gen iPad might have been a surprise but that's about it.

     


    Maybe there's nothing Apple can do right now to change the perception out there but I don't think it would hurt to try.  Clearly Tim Cook is not the guy to do it.



     


    There is nothing Apple can do. WS will still make up negative stories. Apple could release financials on a daily period but WS will spin them negative. They spun the record 4th qtr numbers negatively.

  • Reply 72 of 119
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 6,447member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post




    So now Google is equated with Apple in terms of hardware design. 



     


    Who cares? They're going to sell very few of these things. It's not like we haven't seen the results of meticulous copying of Apple's hardware already from other parties, so why does it matter if Google does it too?


     


    Quote:


    And several weeks ago The Verge ran a feature story aka puff piece on Larry Page's software design revolution at Google.  And a lot of chatter out there is how Google is out-designing Apple in the software space, that the best designed apps on iOS come from Google.



     


    A lot of Google's software is beautifully designed. Some of it is terrible. Same applies to Apple really. Pretty sure we could find examples on both ends of the spectrum being produced by both camps. Revolution, I dunno about that. :) I'm curious to see what Apple has coming up this year for iOS (and OS X, and hopefully iWork). Let's not forget that Forstall is out now, and that may affect iOS and their supporting app design quite a bit (though who can say for sure at this point?). I suspect Jony Ive has some thoughts...


     


    Quote:



    I've no doubt Apple is working on lots of cool shit. But how is being so secretive and closed actually helping them right now?




     


    By making them the most profitable tech company in the world? For starters.


     


    Quote:


      Especially when you have Samsung spending $12B carpet bombing the world with advertising and Google giving tech sites an early look at Google glass (which in turn generates absurdly positive reviews of Chrombook Pixel).  All we get from Apple is Cook saying the pipeline is chock full of stuff.  But since we get no clues on what that stuff might be its left to rumors from Wall Street analysts -mostly things everyone expects like thinner/lighter 5th gen iPad, retina iPad mini and MacBook airs, updated MacBooks with Haswell, etc. - or things that don't really excite anyone - like a cheaper plastic iPhone for China.



     


    With Samsung, what do you expect them to do? Outspend them on advertising? Google Glass is hardly a product at this point, it's a tech demo. You think they're going to sell millions of those and their overpriced browserbook? Announcing non-products far in advance of availability gains what exactly? Look at the Nexus Q. Oh wait, you can't.


     


    Updates to existing successful products are a no-brainer; of course those are coming. Plastic phones for China is a rumor at this point. What on earth are you expecting them to do RIGHT NOW — announce something they are secretly working on in their lab? Give a prototype of some proof-of-concept device to some blogger to write about? Release their 5 year roadmap so competitors know exactly what to expect? So you can get excited? 


     


    Quote:


    Just because Steve Jobs was obsessed with secrecy doesn't mean Tim Cook has to continue that tradition.  And it's not even working.  There were very few products, if any, that Apple released last year that weren't known ahead of time because of leaks.  4th gen iPad might have been a surprise but that's about it.



     


    You do realize that you previously said this:


     


    Quote:


    But since we get no clues on what that stuff might be



     


    So, which is it?


     


    Quote:


    Maybe there's nothing Apple can do right now to change the perception out there but I don't think it would hurt to try.  Clearly Tim Cook is not the guy to do it.



     


    I'm not convinced you could do better.

  • Reply 73 of 119
    zberniezbernie Posts: 37member


    I've discussed the new iMac in numerous Mac forums, and many think the new iMac is dysfunctional.  People are astonished to find that this "all in one" has no optical drive, and feel that it was removed prematurely, for the sake of pushing consumers towards purchasing more content from apple.  The argument that the optical drive is antiquated is ludicrous.  There are still $billions in sales of videos, audio, and software.  I often use the the super drive in my 2011 iMac to rip CD's, burn movies, burn playlists, give photos and videos to friends, etc.  Of course you can buy an external drive, and hang one more ugly piece of equipment from you iMac, but you shouldn't have to.


     


    And the SD card reader is located on the back?  Really?  Now that's convenient.  And no USB ports in a convenient location either?  That's ridiculous.  I have two USB extension cables running from the back of my iMac, just so I can have quick access to a USB port.  Most people I've conversed with don't give a crap about how thin the new iMac is -- It still looks the same from the front.


     


    Give me 1" iMac with an optical drive and some conveniently placed ports, and then I'll consider purchasing one.  I plan on keeping my 2011 for as long as possible.

  • Reply 74 of 119
    robmrobm Posts: 1,068member


    Rogifan- no offence, but you're confusing the share market with the company. As do many round here.


    You guys can't seem to separate the two.


    They are related, of course.


    If you're trading you can only win or lose to others in the market.


    Divs, share splits, buy backs are all part of it, if you're positioned to be able to take advantage.


    Leveraged too much one way - hell it can be fantastic or can cane your arse.


    Timing and liquidity are your friends. But sometimes because of a decision that YOU made ya just gotta wait and wait for it to play out.


    Dont expect Apple  to help you in your endeavour to try and make money from the sharemarket. I don't - never have, not from any company


     


    Really - Its what Slurpy posted above.

  • Reply 75 of 119
    hmmhmm Posts: 3,405member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


     


    None of these things requires more than a 680M. Video encoding is CPU-dependent. 


     



    Solely regarding the gpu issue, I have to say it varies. Most 3d rendering is still cpu based. A lot of the newer ones seem to build in some way of leveraging the gpu, but the most widely used engines remain cpu based. Television or film renders could use gigabytes worth of mapped textures and complex shader stacks on hero objects. This is difficult to deal with at a gpu level. I'm certain these companies would like to implement more gpu based functionality. After Effects went this route with their raytracer, but I don't know how well After Effects would support complex retexturing. I've never tried it, but it would make for a rather complex set of layers given the required passes, if it even works without artifacting. If the comment was regarding 3d applications and CAD in general, much of that comes down to drivers. Gaming benchmarks mean very little there. Unfortunately this is an inconsistent issue. Sometimes the gaming cards work really well. The 680M isn't the fastest available, but it's not a bad card. If someone has a highly gpu constrained workload, I understand why they would want the fastest available when it cannot be upgraded after purchase. You can also go higher in ram on the desktop versions, which goes back to what I mentioned about gpu based renderers. There are reasons to want one thing over another. As for 3d apps, they have a much larger following on Windows than OSX. Apple has picked up some stuff that used to run solely on Linux, which is really great for them.

  • Reply 76 of 119
    ecsecs Posts: 307member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    Do you know what the average PC sells for? It's well under half that $1900 price. Even among Macs $1900 is about $700 above the average sale price. For these reasons alone I don't see how this would kill all non-Mac PC sales.
    That's not true. Last Christmas I did a draft of the PC I'll build if Apple fails to release the computer I need. So I did a configuration with the fastest i7 available, a 4GB NVIDIA card, 512 GB SSD, and a good PSU. The price, from a low cost provider was into the $1600 range. Any PC user who wants to build a good computer for gaming, rendering, music production, video, photo, etc, aim for a configuration like the one I mention, so in the $1500 - $1600 range. So, yes, a $1900 Mac with the same power would be a PC killer, because the slightly higher price is reasonable considering Apple higher quality builds, ultra silent behavior, etc...

    Anyway, I didn't finally buy that configuration, because I'm waiting for the next Apple move.

    Regarding some other comments I read, I don't think the problem with Apple desktops is that "there's nothing in the middle". The problem is that Apple lacks the most demanded sector of current desktops, which isn't the middle, but top i7s with top GPUs. Apple doesn't sell you a top i7 with a top GPU unless you're willing to buy it attached to a 28 inch display (and attached in a way that you cannot service it in case some component fails). Paying $3000 for such a configuration it's a joke, and it goes up to that price because of the nonsense of buying it attached to a 28 inch display, and because the only SSD option is 768 GB.

    Problem is that Apple isn't neglecting 20% of the desktop market by doing this, but 80% of the desktop market.

    Current Mac desktops are targeted to users who don't need a desktop. That's the problem. No wonder Apple is in the "post desktop" era. If you don't release the desktops that desktop users need, how couldn't you be in the "post desktop" era?
  • Reply 77 of 119
    .
    I have wanted a MacBook for a while but I will not buy one with less than 16 gig of Ram.

    That means I have to spend 3K for the only model that has 16 gig ram.

    Not likely.

    Less than 16 is basically obsolete out the door.
    .
  • Reply 78 of 119
    .
    I have wanted a MacBook for a while but I will not buy one with less than 16 gig of Ram.

    That means I have to spend 3K for the only model that has 16 gig ram.

    Not likely.

    Less than 16 is basically obsolete out the door.
    .
  • Reply 79 of 119
    .
    I have wanted a MacBook for a while but I will not buy one with less than 16 gig of Ram.

    That means I have to spend 3K for the only model that has 16 gig ram.

    Not likely.

    Less than 16 is basically obsolete out the door.
    .
  • Reply 80 of 119
    ecsecs Posts: 307member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Ghangstalked View Post



    .

    I have wanted a MacBook for a while but I will not buy one with less than 16 gig of Ram.



    That means I have to spend 3K for the only model that has 16 gig ram.



    Not likely.



    Less than 16 is basically obsolete out the door.

    .


     


    Regarding your wish of 16GB RAM on your laptop, you might consider my experience on laptops vs desktops:


     


    I've been an advocate of replacing desktops by laptops for some years now. However, I've changed my opinion this last year. Why? Well, because the latest hardware runs *hot*. I'm very happy with my MacBook Air, use it everyday, and it's the best computer I've owned in terms of balance between comfort and performance. But, when I push it to 100% CPU or 100% GPU, its fans jump to full speed. If I need 100% performance for more than 15 minutes, I don't believe that's healthy for my Macbook, it was certainly designed for less demanding work. The same happens to MacBook Pros: push it to 100% CPU/GPU and fans go crazy.


     


    My current opinion about laptops is that if you need to have the machine working at 100% for more than 15 minutes, that's not a healthy task for a laptop, but for a desktop. So, I´ll complement my Macbook Air with a (powerful) desktop in coming months. Long renderings jobs (LuxRender and such), as well as gaming, will go to the desktop. On the other hand, I'll continue to use the MacBook Air for source code compiling, as well as Office and Gimp work, and also for very demanding CPU/GPU work if it doesn't last more than a few minutes.


     


    One thing I'll not repeat on my MacBook Air is playing the Sims 3 for a whole morning. Performance of Sims3 is very good on the MacBook Air, but fans are at top speed during all your game, and the laptop surface really *burns* (I cannot keep my finger over the first row of the keyboard -just where the CPU and the GPU are- because it burns).


     


    I'm saying this just in case your wish of having 16GB RAM on a laptop was for doing things similar to what I do with my MacBook Air, just in case it helps.

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