Mid-sized smartphones like Apple's iPhone see most usage, 'phablets' a fad - report

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  • Reply 61 of 68
    v5vv5v Posts: 1,357member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Smallwheels View Post




    [...] With the ability to plug into larger monitors, phones and tablets can become our computers, thus replacing conventional desk top machines.



     


    That would be one of the issues for anyone doing multi-window work. Many "clerical" people already have dual monitors, so the screen real-estate provided by a tablet is one of the obstacles to be overcome.


     


     


    I agree with your points about there being no inherent obstacle to multi-user environments or accessing outside data, but there's still the issue of enterprise-level software developers making their products available on portable platforms.


     


     


    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Smallwheels View Post


    In a few years our phones will be our computers. I'm eager for that to happen. The intermediate step is tablets. They're almost there now.



     


    If we're talking "in the future" my views are not the same as if we're talking about "now." As I said in my earlier post, I don't think a hand-held computer is going to replace an office desktop "in its current form." There are still interface issues that need to be addressed.

  • Reply 62 of 68
    v5v wrote: »
    Whose office is that? Not ours. Ours involves dozens of people all working in the same media management software simultaneously. The app includes scripts for every item, so it's typing intensive. I would humbly suggest that an iPad is less well suited to that task than a simple desktop computer.

    I would also respectfully suggest that what you list as tasks do NOT actually represent the typical 21st century office. Sales people access inventory and contact management software, with some of the data sourced from suppliers. Medical office personnel access multiple interlinked databases, again, some internal, some not. Financial sector workers use proprietary management systems. I don't think there are many industries in which the old "word-processing and spreadsheet" model still exists.

    Please note that I am not criticizing the iPad. I think it's an incredibly cool step. I just don't agree that, in its current form, it's going to displace a lot of conventional workstations.
    You are completely wrong when it comes to sales. All major sales teams are moving to tablets because it's the easiest tool for lead capture and presentations. Also, most crm applications are going cloud for that express purpose. The best example is sales force. My company is getting rid of the last application restricted to laptop/desktop because it's too old to integrate with the other cloud apps we use for work. Just because tablets don't fit into your workflow, don't assume that they don't work for other business categories.
  • Reply 63 of 68
    mikeb85mikeb85 Posts: 506member


    'Phablets' aren't a fad, but they'll never be the mainstream smartphone form either.  Phone size falls into the 'preference' category, people will like the size that works for them.

  • Reply 64 of 68
    curtis hannahcurtis hannah Posts: 1,722member
    mikeb85 wrote: »
    'Phablets' aren't a fad, but they'll never be the mainstream smartphone form either.  Phone size falls into the 'preference' category, people will like the size that works for them.
    Well that made me think that phadlets are short lived/s.
  • Reply 65 of 68
    kdarlingkdarling Posts: 1,640member


    FWIW, a lot of analysts are predicting that the next few years will be big for phablets.


     


    According to Barclays, five to seven inch phablets now make up about 5% of smartphone sales.  That's one in twenty, which is a lot.  They recently predicted that phablets will jump to 15% of smartphone sales in 2013, and 20% in 2015.


     


    iSuppli has also predicted that phablets will more than double in sales from 2012 to 2013.


     


    The reasons given for this, include the fact that talking on a phone is no longer a primary smartphone activity, whereas messaging, web browsing, video, apps, etc. are...  and most of those are nicer on a larger screen.

  • Reply 66 of 68
    curtis hannahcurtis hannah Posts: 1,722member
    kdarling wrote: »
    FWIW, a lot of analysts are predicting that the next few years will be big for phablets.

    According to Barclays, five to seven inch phablets now make up about 5% of smartphone sales.  That's one in twenty, which is a lot.  They<span style="line-height:1.231;"> recently predicted that phablets will jump to 15% of smartphone sales in 2013, and 20% in 2015.</span>


    iSuppli has also predicted that phablets will more than double in sales from 2012 to 2013.

    The reasons given for this, include the fact that talking on a phone is no longer a primary smartphone activity, whereas messaging, web browsing, video, apps, etc. are...  and most of those are nicer on a larger screen.
    Well since you are saying this why instead of a phablet not just use a tablet(small like IPad mini) they go from 6.X inches up plus commonly have larger screens.
  • Reply 67 of 68
    v5vv5v Posts: 1,357member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Curtis Hannah View Post



    Well since you are saying this why instead of a phablet not just use a tablet(small like IPad mini) they go from 6.X inches up plus commonly have larger screens.


     


    In my case, voice calls are no longer the primary use of the device, but that doesn't mean I don't use it as a phone at all. That means an iPad, which is not capable of standard phone calling, is rather obviously not an option, don't you think? If they add a telephone to the iPad Mini, THEN I will buy that instead.

  • Reply 68 of 68
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member


    Originally Posted by v5v View Post

    There's no such thing. The storage may be free, but the data plan for transfer to and from it isn't.


     


    Magical. Neither is the electricity to run the device nor the hard drive if you decide to do local storage.

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