Microsoft lambasts Google for sharing personal information of Android users

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  • Reply 41 of 122
    genovellegenovelle Posts: 946member
    I actually like the ads. I'm glad someone is saying it. They have nothing to loose really because most of their profit is locked in Windows contracts that Chrome has no chance of dislodging. Everyone is falling all of them because they give other peoples idea's for free. I saw they were quick to go after Microsoft over Bing when they felt their algorithm was at risk.
    Apple does not provide this information to developers because they know that it can be used by criminals in all kinds of ways. When you add the fact that 96% of all mobile malware is on the android platform to Google supplying the real name, email address, neighbor hood, and they types of apps they buy, this is a very nasty combination that can not have a good out come. Especially when some of the nastiest apps have been provided for download directly on the Google Play store. Of course people will say, crooks are everywhere on the internet, but this makes you a direct target because they can capture information they know is correct.
  • Reply 42 of 122
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,219moderator
    C'mon Google, don't be evil now.

    At least they're open about it. No wait, what does 'open' mean again?
    Hi
    I am not here to defend anyone but, dear Microsoft it is called Google checkout for merchants and developers , as in every business when you sell a product you see the details of your customers, whether it is an app or a book, by the way also customers can see the developers name,company name and the address , so it is equal , as you should be aware all email marketings are opt-out by default . I do not see any mistakes here , what is the problem to complain.

    It's a valid point. If you make an e-commerce transaction, your personal information generally goes to the seller. I'd say app stores are a bit different because it can involve millions of people getting a free app and the developer can be anyone. You can imagine some spammer putting a free app on Google Play, getting loads of downloads and selling or using the email database for spamming. That kind of thing would be very difficult to pull off even as a 3rd party seller on Amazon. I don't think there's any reason to pass on the details other than to perhaps verify a purchase and provide support but they can get unique codes. I don't know why they wouldn't use unique anonymous ids like they do with other products.
  • Reply 43 of 122
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 8,653member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by KDarling View Post


    Most of us buy stuff all the time from eBay, Amazon, and other online stores... 


     



     


    Yeah, most people do buy plenty of stuff online, including me.


     


    There's a big difference though between buying something from Amazon, a business that has been around for a long time, and one where you know that you are most likely not going to get ripped off or be worried about them giving up your info to a criminal cartel or a bunch of scammers and hackers. People can check out businesses that they purchase goods from online, and then decide if they wish to buy from them or if they should go and buy from someplace else. I don't buy anything online from shady websites or places that I'm unsure about.


     


    Now imagine that every time that you go to download an app, Google is just passing along your information to whoever it may be. If I were a big time criminal, I would definitely be praising Android, because it would provide me with many interesting opportunities.

  • Reply 44 of 122
    genovellegenovelle Posts: 946member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by matrix07 View Post


    It makes you wonder, doesn't it? How everyone just kneel to the lord G.



    They kneel because the internet is the new economy and Google is the current Gate Keeper. If they just happen to tweak their algorithm one day and you page gets pushed to the 5th page of search results it can have an effect on your business and visibility.  They recently tried it with iTunes and searches were demoted, but someone picked up on it and blogged about it hours later. So, Google said oh it was a mistake when tweaking and fixed it right away. imagine that.  They were clearly watching for a response because they reacted way to quick.

  • Reply 45 of 122
    macbook promacbook pro Posts: 1,605member
    The last time I bought something from a store, I can't recall them asking me for my: name, address, email address or anything of the like. It's one thing if it's a store that I have a rewards card for, since I KNOWINGLY gave them the information. Google sells it without your knowledge, especially if you didn't read ALL of the fine print as an Android user. That's where Google is making money on "FREE" Android. 

    How are their users SO BLIND?!?!

    I even switched to Yahoo! search, since I was tired of getting emails from Staples targeting items for every electronics device I searched using Google Shopping. 

    Android's "freedom" is NOT intended for the end user. It's all smoke and mirrors that I want little to no part of. 

    Google has effectively compromised the independence of most all of the major consumer groups and supposed accountability watchdogs in Washington with:
    • Free advertising through Google Grants: "Google Grants has awarded AdWords advertising to hundreds of non-profit groups";
    • Generous intern or fellowship programs; and
    • Generous financial support of liberal grass-roots organizations and their pet issues like net neutrality


    The "media reform" movement run by "FreePress / Stop Big Media" has been coopted by Google as its chief corporate ally, so that while it rails against offline media consolidation, which is heavily restricted in law and regulation, they are impotent and de-fanged on the unprecedented consolidation of online media that Google has already accomplished on the Internet.

    It is the height of irony that in opposing offline media gatekeepers, they have enabled the ultimate online gatekeeper, Google, to consolidate effective and unprecendented gatekeeper control over online content -- the content of the future! This media reform community is so badly compromised and conflicted that they refuse to acknowlege that they have essentially "looked the other way" while Google has concentrated more "big" corporate power over online media than ever could have been achieved in the offline world.


    Furthermore, most of the blogging community has a financial conflict of interest in covering Google, because Google is the blogosphere's primary source of compensation and monetization. This tends to make many of them cheerleaders for Google.
  • Reply 46 of 122
    agramonteagramonte Posts: 345member


    Good thing Tin-Foil Hats match iOS devices - not sure Windows ones thou.

  • Reply 47 of 122
    palominepalomine Posts: 362member
    I just changed my default search to Bing. Not out of any caring for MS, except to say Thanks for creating the 'Scroogled' meme.

    Really glad the meme has started now. Perhaps it will get people to wondering about things.
    Maybe the idea will gain repetition and traction. Hope MS does more commercials like this.
  • Reply 48 of 122
    anonymouseanonymouse Posts: 6,578member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post





    I'm fairly certain you will often get a dialogue box asking if it's OK for Apple to share your contact information with the publisher/developer.


     


    a) That's not iBooks, it's Subscriptions.


     


    b) That's not even remotely by any stretch of the imagination the same thing.


     


    Nice try, though, but you had nothin' to work with.

  • Reply 49 of 122
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,614member
    Marvin wrote: »
    C'mon Google, don't be evil now.

    At least they're open about it.

    It's a valid point. If you make an e-commerce transaction, your personal information generally goes to the seller. I'd say app stores are a bit different because it can involve millions of people getting a free app and the developer can be anyone. You can imagine some spammer putting a free app on Google Play, getting loads of downloads and selling or using the email database for spamming.

    Marvin, you'd have a valid complaint if Google forwarded contact information for free apps. They don't. It only does so for paid applications where the payment goes to the developer.
  • Reply 50 of 122
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 8,653member


    And I wonder, does this apply to free apps on Google also?


     


    If I were a scammer, that's exactly what I would do. I would make some quick, free, crappy Android app that would look interesting enough so that millions of Android users would download it. Google, my partner in crime, would hand over all of the info of those millions of users to me, and then I would get busy with my real scheme.

  • Reply 51 of 122
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 8,653member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post



    They don't. It only does so for paid applications where the payment goes to the developer.


     


    That is still terrible though.


     


    I don't want all of my info going to some hacker group in China, just because I decided to buy a 99 cent app.

  • Reply 52 of 122
    macbook promacbook pro Posts: 1,605member
    I think it is interesting that Google doesn't really police Google Play. Google Play has many of the same restrictions that the Apple App Store has but doesn't appear to follow their own guidelines.
  • Reply 53 of 122

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post





    I'm fairly certain you will often get a dialogue box asking if it's OK for Apple to share your contact information with the publisher/developer.


    I belive what you are talking about is actually newsstand.  iBooks has never asked me about sharing information, but I believe you are correct about newsstand asking you if you want to share.


     


    Again though there is a difference between Apple actively asking you if you want to share on newpaper / magazine subscriptions, and Google's just sharing your information on everything.

  • Reply 54 of 122
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,614member
    ajmonline wrote: »
    I belive what you are talking about is actually newsstand.  iBooks has never asked me about sharing information, but I believe you are correct about newsstand asking you if you want to share.

    Again though there is a difference between Apple actively asking you if you want to share on newpaper / magazine subscriptions, and Google's just sharing your information on everything.

    Duh. . .
    Yes sir that's exactly the service i meant. Thanks for catching that.
  • Reply 55 of 122
    genovellegenovelle Posts: 946member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by baconAndTrance View Post


     




         There are some many examples where you are required to provide your address even though you do not receive any physical good. whether it is buying hosting,domain name, or a service on ebay or amazon , you will still required to provide your address and the merchant who provides the service  will see your address . that is my point . Seeing addresses and  emails of the customers does not make any difference for the Devs, all emails are opt-out by default for marketing.



    There is a big difference in this sharing.  For instance eBay has a system in place to protect against fraud. Each buyer and seller has a rating showing the number of transactions and the percentage of positive responses. So if they are questionable they will be outed. Ebay also offer fraud protection incase it does occur.  Spammers, hackers, and other criminals can use the data provided by Google, to target certain areas based on current events or affluence etc.  Identity theft can occur with one more piece of data.  If they have hacked systems that have the other pieces then they can gain access to your accounts or make purchases in your name. 

  • Reply 56 of 122
    What a bunch of crap! Don't you people know that there is no such thing as privacy anymore?? EVERYBODY collects your info. You think it's safe in the hands of Apple or Microsoft? Maybe for now it is. But what happens if they decide to scroogle you? You gonna be like the guy who mentioned earlier that he'll us Symbian or no phone or OS at all? I bet you'll use the 666 chip! Sheesh!! I'm a huge rpg fan and I use this Genius thing in iTunes, and I keep wondering why Aralon never popped up. It was by accident that I found it. I bought Chrono Trigger, but I don't see Secret of Mana popping up? Maybe I'm using it wrong, but if not, I wouldn't mind my info being sold. It would only make things easier. Even if it's only junk you send to me, you can't make me buy it? Simple as that. So stop whining over this privacy thing. Can't you people see we're heading towards the non cash and non privacy era?
  • Reply 57 of 122
    sockrolidsockrolid Posts: 2,788member


    SCROOGLED

  • Reply 58 of 122
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,219moderator
    gatorguy wrote: »
    Marvin, you'd have a valid complaint if Google forwarded contact information for free apps. They don't. It only does so for paid applications where the payment goes to the developer.

    Does it include in-app purchases for free apps? Also, is there a particular reason why the info is sent on rather than not at all?
  • Reply 59 of 122
    pfisherpfisher Posts: 758member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by eksodos View Post



    This is why my next phone will be a Microsoft Windows Phone. Microsoft is leading the way in terms of protecting the privacy of its users.




    On the other hand, I've recently been "Microsoft'ed".


     


    I installed a new harddrive in my MacBook Pro and I went to restore Office 2011. The install said I'd already used the product key. I called MS, and they said I'd have to buy Office again. I know, there was a big stink about this with Office 2013 and MS relented, but good luck with their support helping you get your situation fixed. I've called 5 times and still have not gotten a solution.


     


    Then I went to use my 25 GB of Skydrive, I was going to upgrade another 50 GB. Well, they too away everyone's free 25 GB and lowered it to 7 GB. There was a small window of time, IF YOU KNEW, when you could say, "yes, I really do want that 25 GB."


     


    I feel like MS is a big stupid company. I wanted to give the a second chance and they've burned me.


     


    BTW, I'm using NeoOffice and its working pretty great. $10 if you don't compile the code yourself. It's a fork of OpenOffice.


     


    P

  • Reply 60 of 122
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,614member
    Marvin wrote: »
    Does it include in-app purchases for free apps? Also, is there a particular reason why the info is sent on rather than not at all?

    If money changes hands and Google is being consistent I would assume so, but honestly don't know for certain. As for why I mentioned it earlier. Google considers the developer to be the seller. Apple considers themselves to be the seller.
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