Apple's official WWDC 2013 iOS app now available

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
Apple on Monday launched its official application for the 2013 Worldwide Developers Conference, including a new video integration feature.

WWDC


The free application is now available for download from the iOS App Store, and it is designed for both iPhone and iPad. Session videos from this year's WWDC will be available daily for registered developers to stream from the application.

Other features of the software, according to Apple, include the ability to:
  • Browse times, locations, and descriptions for sessions, labs, and special events
  • Mark schedule items as favorites with a simple double-tap
  • Start watching on one iOS device, and pick up where you left off on another
  • Keep up with the latest news, get important notifications, and see daily snapshots
  • View maps to find your way around Moscone West
  • Provide feedback on session content and speakers within the session details view
  • Add your attendee information to Passbook for speedier on-site registration
The official WWDC 2013 application launches a week before the annual conference is scheduled to begin in San Francisco, Calif. The event will kick off with a keynote presentation at Moscone West, at which the company has promised to show off the next versions of iOS and OS X.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 44
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member


    I really don't understand why they don't just update the previous one! Now there are THREE of them!

  • Reply 2 of 44
    ghostface147ghostface147 Posts: 1,629member


    Windows 8 flatness alert!  The madness, the hideousness!  /s

  • Reply 3 of 44
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member


    Originally Posted by ghostface147 View Post

    Windows 8 flatness alert!  The madness, the hideousness!  /s


     


    Yeah, I don't like the lack of contrast here.

  • Reply 4 of 44
    smiles77smiles77 Posts: 668member


    aaand cue the comments about app design reference to iOS 7 skinning. Interesting that they use no "buttons" below, but rather just a highlighting effect. Don't think I care for it as much.

  • Reply 5 of 44
    asciiascii Posts: 5,941member
    Aren't developers more likely to have their Macbook Pros with them?
  • Reply 6 of 44
    auxioauxio Posts: 2,243member


    Same sentiment regarding the flatness.  I do like modern design (clean lines, functional) for architecture and computer hardware.  But I think software interfaces need to have an element of depth to them because there's nothing concrete to give you visual or tactile cues.  Hopefully there's a lot more to the new iOS 7 interface than we're seeing here.

  • Reply 7 of 44
    gazoobeegazoobee Posts: 3,754member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by ascii View Post



    Aren't developers more likely to have their Macbook Pros with them?


     


    This kind of app doesn't make any sense on a MacBook Pro though.  

  • Reply 8 of 44
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    Yeah, I don't like the lack of contrast here.
    :lol: this app looks almost exactly the same as it did last year.
  • Reply 9 of 44
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    auxio wrote: »
    Same sentiment regarding the flatness.  I do like modern design (clean lines, functional) for architecture and computer hardware.  But I think software interfaces need to have an element of depth to them because there's nothing concrete to give you visual or tactile cues.  Hopefully there's a lot more to the new iOS 7 interface than we're seeing here.
    This app looks basically the same as it did last year. Surely you don't think Apple would tip it's hand on iOS 7 design with this app?
  • Reply 10 of 44
    gazoobeegazoobee Posts: 3,754member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by auxio View Post


    Same sentiment regarding the flatness.  I do like modern design (clean lines, functional) for architecture and computer hardware.  But I think software interfaces need to have an element of depth to them because there's nothing concrete to give you visual or tactile cues.  Hopefully there's a lot more to the new iOS 7 interface than we're seeing here.



     


    Indeed.  It's generally a mistake to believe that "pure flatness" can even be achieved because even without shading, the human eye will still place some on screen objects "in front" of others etc.  It's just the way we see things as three dimensional beings.  Apple must know this as they have all the great designers who should know it almost instinctually.  


     


    Even this for example:



     


    Is viewed by the user as a bunch of square objects, lying on top of a "background" layer.  No one looks at it and thinks that the tiles are flat and on the same plane as the background, or that the background is a sheet with holes in it that the tiles fit into.  


     


     


    I severely doubt that all shading and depth will be removed from iOS 7.  Most of the file picking interface, as well as the notifications, requires it.


     


    All indications are that it will be toned down, and that the glossy highlights will be gone, but that otherwise things will still be 3D.  

  • Reply 11 of 44
    The strange thing about the app icon is how undesigned it is. One could come upon that design either by having a very strict sense of aesthetic guidelines, or simply by not really giving a crap. But it may look better when the entire interface is uniform. Has it been mentioned that this is probably the first major thing Apple has done without Steve Jobs approval? Intriguing.
  • Reply 12 of 44
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member


    Originally Posted by AndrewofArabia View Post

    Has it been mentioned that this is probably the first major thing Apple has done without Steve Jobs approval? Intriguing.


     


    No, because that's completely wrong.

  • Reply 13 of 44
    charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,217member
    I really don't understand why they don't just update the previous one! Now there are THREE of them!

    Because then you would have nothing to gripe about.
  • Reply 14 of 44
    charlitunacharlituna Posts: 7,217member
    No, because that's completely wrong.

    Unless you work at Apple you don't know that. Just like no one knows which things happening now did or did not start before he left.
  • Reply 15 of 44
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member


    Originally Posted by charlituna View Post

    Unless you work at Apple you don't know that. Just like no one knows which things happening now did or did not start before he left.


     


    So absolutely every single detail of absolutely everything that Apple has done in the past 1.75 years was signed, sealed, and approved by Steve Jobs before his death.


     


    He laid out a roadmap that contained all those actions and they followed it to the letter.




    Despite him telling them not to do that.


     


  • Reply 16 of 44
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 4,908member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Tallest Skil View Post


     


    So absolutely every single detail of absolutely everything that Apple has done in the past 1.75 years was signed, sealed, and approved by Steve Jobs before his death.


     


    He laid out a roadmap that contained all those actions and they followed it to the letter.




    Despite him telling them not to do that.


     




    Not sure that is fact or what we all would like to believe. However, there are statements and some indications that it is fact and the people there are following the script. Even Cooks appearance on D11 appear to be Job's scripting. Cook used his words very purposely, just like Steve has in the past. However, there are also indications that Apple is making decisions for itself without Steve's consideration like the shuffling of management and getting rid of certain people.

  • Reply 17 of 44
    auxioauxio Posts: 2,243member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gazoobee View Post


     


    Indeed.  It's generally a mistake to believe that "pure flatness" can even be achieved because even without shading, the human eye will still place some on screen objects "in front" of others etc.  It's just the way we see things as three dimensional beings.  Apple must know this as they have all the great designers who should know it almost instinctually.  



     


    Right.  But I'm thinking even more on the functional side of things.  For example, when we encounter a door, how do we know where to grab it and how to manipulate it?  We need to see the handle, determine whether it's protruding (or inset), the shape of the handle, etc.  Physical elements, combined with lighting, give us these cues.  We don't need to learn how to use most doors, we can generally figure it out in a second or two using intuition.


     


    With software, you need to recreate physical cues so that people know where to tap, how to drag, and generally how to manipulate things which have no physical representation.  Hence why it's frustrating to interact with a website which requires you to move your mouse cursor over different areas to find such cues (rollover effects).  And why, IMO, flat interfaces are frustrating for most people.

  • Reply 18 of 44
    Yeah, how many major things has Apple released since Steve Jobs died? We know he was involved with all the major products, he even came around on the iPad Mini. iOS 7 is shine, gloss, depth, and Steve-free.
  • Reply 19 of 44
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member


    Originally Posted by AndrewofArabia View Post

    Yeah, how many major things has Apple released since Steve Jobs died?


     


    The retina MacBook Pro, the redesigned iMac, the iPhone 5, the iPad mini, the iPod touch 5, the iPod nano 7, the Apple TV 3, the iPad 4, the MacBook Air, the Mac Mini, the camera-less iPod touch…






    …he even came around on the iPad Mini.



     


    That can't be said with accuracy.

  • Reply 20 of 44
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    The strange thing about the app icon is how undesigned it is. One could come upon that design either by having a very strict sense of aesthetic guidelines, or simply by not really giving a crap. But it may look better when the entire interface is uniform. Has it been mentioned that this is probably the first major thing Apple has done without Steve Jobs approval? Intriguing.
    Check out the app from last year. Basically the same as this years app. Since this app is used once a year and for a specific purpose I don't think we should read in to the design of it. Especially assuming it has any meaning on what iOS 7 will look like.
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