Apple's Haswell-powered 15" MacBook Pro revealed in benchmark test

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited January 2014
A system appearing to be Apple's next-generation 15-inch MacBook Pro, featuring a quad-core Haswell processor clocked at 2.4 gigahertz, has appeared in an online benchmark test.

Benchmark


The Geekbench result for a machine identified as "AAPLJ45,1" was spotted on Tuesday by MacRumors. The test machine features 16 gigabytes of RAM and was spotted running OS X 10.9 Mavericks Build 13A2052.

The machine earned a Geekbench score of 12,497, which is comparable with current-generation 15-inch MacBook Pro models. It's likely that any MacBook Pros with Haswell would see improvements in battery life rather than horsepower, as already seen in the new Haswell-equipped MacBook Air models.

The CPU found in the assumed pre-release MacBook Pro is an Intel Core i7-4950HQ. Intel's latest-generation Core i7 mobile chips feature Iris 5200 graphics.

rMBP


The Iris moniker launched by Intel this year is a way for the chipmaker to differentiate its premium integrated graphics from the traditional "Intel HD" solution. Iris 5200 is Intel's top-of-the-line GPU option, intended to compete with Nvidia's GeForce GT 650M, a discrete GPU currently found in the 15-inch Retina MacBook Pro.

Last month, Geekbench tests also revealed what appears to be a next-generation 13-inch MacBook Pro with Intel's Haswell. That system, which featured a Core i5-4258U processor clocked at 2.4 gigahertz, earned a score of 7,140.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 50


    I don't think I ever realized before that the i7 is 75% more powerful than the i5.

  • Reply 2 of 50
    fithianfithian Posts: 82member
    Nice. My old MacBook Pro (2009) 3.06 2-core was 4717. New one is almost three times as quick. My MacPro (2010) 3.33 6-core was 15713. Not quite a MacPro but close. So when?
  • Reply 3 of 50
    I'm not sure what the implication of this is. It is going to have a GT650m class integrated GPU along with a discrete unit?

    or...

    No. No that couldn't be. We won't think of such awful things.
  • Reply 4 of 50
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,383member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by LighteningKid View Post


    I don't think I ever realized before that the i7 is 75% more powerful than the i5.



    For certain types of apps it's the preferred processor, but if you aren't running those types of apps, then you might not see that big of a difference and it might be better to spend the money on some other feature like addition SSD or a Fusion drive.  but if you have the money and run certain apps that are heavy CPU, then go for it.


     


    If you do lots of video editing, trancoding, a very heavy Photoshop work, you'll benefit.  If not, and you are general user, spend the money elsewhere unless you have the extra cash.

  • Reply 5 of 50
    Thinking about it for a few minutes... there's no way they'd drop the dGPU. Not yet. But that might be in the cards in the not-so-distant future.
  • Reply 6 of 50
    [repost]
  • Reply 7 of 50
    applezillaapplezilla Posts: 941member


    image

  • Reply 8 of 50
    I have money burning a hole in my pocket waiting for a Haswell-powered 13" Retina. Come on, Apple. Release them already haha.
  • Reply 9 of 50
    ahmlcoahmlco Posts: 432member
    Anyone want to place bets on size vs battery life? Same thickness and dramatically extended life, or roughly the same but 30% (or whatever) thinner?
  • Reply 10 of 50
    cash907cash907 Posts: 893member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by BuddyRevell View Post



    I have money burning a hole in my pocket waiting for a Haswell-powered 13" Retina. Come on, Apple. Release them already haha.


     


    You and me both. That they are waiting for Mavericks to be finalized is absolutely infuriating. I'm using Mavericks already, it's nothing worth waiting for. Release the refresh already, Cook. Stop trying to artificially increase the value and market share of your OS update by tying it to new systems. It's such a garbage tactic. 

  • Reply 11 of 50
    esummersesummers Posts: 912member
    deansolecki - They will definitely drop the discrete GPU. The Iris 5200 can almost match the 650M and can beat it in OpenCL tests. It also has the advantage of ECC memory unlike the 650M and far lower battery drain. The discrete chip is definitely going away.
  • Reply 12 of 50

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by esummers View Post



    deansolecki - They will definitely drop the discrete GPU. The Iris 5200 can almost match the 650M and can beat it in OpenCL tests. It also has the advantage of ECC memory unlike the 650M and far lower battery drain. The discrete chip is definitely going away.


    You make good points but Apple could offer the following configurations;


     


    1. 13" rMBP using integrated Iris 5100 graphics


    2. 15" rMBP using integrated Iris Pro 5200 graphics


    3. 15" rMBP using integrated Iris Pro 5200 graphics + discrete GPU

  • Reply 13 of 50
    loaderloader Posts: 1member
    My 2012 retina Ivy Bridge 2.7 GHz i7 quad-core MBP scores about 13,500 under OS X 10.6.8 and about 15,500 under Windows 7 Ultimate in Bootcamp, so no upgrady for me!
  • Reply 14 of 50
    theothergeofftheothergeoff Posts: 2,081member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Fithian View Post



    Nice. My old MacBook Pro (2009) 3.06 2-core was 4717. New one is almost three times as quick. My MacPro (2010) 3.33 6-core was 15713. Not quite a MacPro but close. So when?


    Given the back to school specials are out right now... Likely Late Sept/early October at the earliest.  my guess is that they will hold off until Mavericks is released, as you can see there is no marketable performance benefit for buying one now on the spec side of the sheet.

  • Reply 15 of 50
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,232moderator
    I'm not sure what the implication of this is. It is going to have a GT650m class integrated GPU along with a discrete unit?

    or...

    No. No that couldn't be. We won't think of such awful things.

    It's not as awful as it seems and it may just be the entry model in order to get the price down so they can get rid of the old design. The performance of this chip is tested here against the 650M:

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/6993/intel-iris-pro-5200-graphics-review-core-i74950hq-tested/6

    In game tests, the 650M comes out around 40% faster and this year's dGPUs will be 30% faster again so I'd say 2013 dGPUs would be ~50% faster but the OpenCL compute performance of Iris is higher than the 650M.

    The really important factor to consider is power consumption, which Intel puts at 47W but there's an interesting note on the Anand site here:

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/6993/intel-iris-pro-5200-graphics-review-core-i74950hq-tested/5

    "At the request of at least one very eager OEM, Intel is offering a higher-TDP configuration of the i7-4950HQ. Using Intel’s Extreme Tuning Utility (XTU) I was able to simulate this cTDP up configuration by increasing the sustained power limit to 55W, and moving the short term turbo power limit up to 69W. OEMs moving from a 2-chip CPU + GPU solution down to a single Iris Pro are encouraged to do the same as their existing thermal solutions should be more than adequate to cool a 55W part. I strongly suspect this is the configuration we’ll see in the next-generation 15-inch MacBook Pro with Retina Display."

    The benchmarks on Anandtech may not be accurate for the rMBP because they tried to simulate the increased power but they clocked the CPU to 3.2GHz and the Geekbench test shows the standard 2.4GHz so if Apple has got a special 55W part, they might be able to allocate it better to the IGP.

    Still, you'd be looking at 55W max vs 45W CPU + 45W dGPU = 90W max. As Anand rightly points out, both CPU and GPU won't typically be at maximum but the two-chip laptops can definitely draw over 90W:

    http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1426601

    So in those instances, the power adaptors shouldn't get anywhere near as hot, fan noise less and battery-life will improve. They'll most likely be able to advertise it with similar usage times as the Air. Even if the upper models have dedicated GPUs, they can shut them off.

    I could actually see them using Iris Pro in the whole 15" lineup and just lowering the prices. It has been suggested in a few places that Iris was made at Apple's request. If that's the case, it makes sense for them to use it in a big way. They won't have to deal with graphics switching any more.
  • Reply 16 of 50
    winterwinter Posts: 1,238member
    Yes! I was dying for new news either on the Mac mini or on Iris Pro or [B]something[/B]! Huzzah!
  • Reply 17 of 50
    jragostajragosta Posts: 10,473member
    I don't think I ever realized before that the i7 is 75% more powerful than the i5.

    fithian wrote: »
    Nice. My old MacBook Pro (2009) 3.06 2-core was 4717. New one is almost three times as quick. My MacPro (2010) 3.33 6-core was 15713. Not quite a MacPro but close. So when?

    We need to get away from the concept that a single benchmark tells you anything useful.

    Under SOME tests, you get the results above. Other tests will show something entirely different. In fact, in my experience, Geekbench often UNDERestimates the performance that most people will see.

    It comes down to what you're planning to do. If game fps is the most important thing to you, then you should test the game(s) you use to get their fps. If Photoshop editing is your application, then your testing should mimic Photoshop performance. And so on.

    Of course, only a very small percentage of users need to care any more. Even an older system is more than adequate for what most people do. Heck, I'm typing this on a 2.33 Ghz Core 2 Duo MacBook Pro (with 3 GB RAM maximum) and the computer isn't the limiting factor other than the very rare times when I'm editing video - and that's rare enough that the little extra time doesn't hurt me.
  • Reply 18 of 50
    heffequeheffeque Posts: 139member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Marvin View Post





    ...


    So in those instances, the power adaptors shouldn't get anywhere near as hot, fan noise less and battery-life will improve. They'll most likely be able to advertise it with similar usage times as the Air. Even if the upper models have dedicated GPUs, they can shut them off.



    I could actually see them using Iris Pro in the whole 15" lineup and just lowering the prices. It has been suggested in a few places that Iris was made at Apple's request. If that's the case, it makes sense for them to use it in a big way. They won't have to deal with graphics switching any more.


    Yeah! I can't wait to see a MacBook Pro with no AMD or nVidia dGPU... but with Intel's GPU and their magnificent drivers. I'm sure all Pro users will be happy to see such a thing happen! Why use a dGPU while doing 3D stuff or OpenCL stuff when you can use Intel integrated super powered graphics!

  • Reply 19 of 50
    thedbathedba Posts: 482member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Cash907 View PostRelease the refresh already, Cook. Stop trying to artificially increase the value and market share of your OS update by tying it to new systems. It's such a garbage tactic. 


    And you know this, how?

  • Reply 20 of 50
    esummersesummers Posts: 912member
    cash907 - Other vendors have not released any machines with this chip either. Nothing beyond 2-core, Iris 5100 and lower chips so far. It is not clear if they are waiting for Mavericks or if the machine and suppliers just are not ready.
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