Tim Cook sees 'an iPad Christmas,' calls Apple 'a force for good in the world'

Posted:
in iPad edited January 2014
Apple's chief executive Tim Cook didn't mince any words in describing the company's prospects for the coming holiday quarter, nor in directing attention to Apple's contributions beyond its products.

Tim Cook


While often portrayed as more restrained and less passionately dramatic than Steve Jobs was, Cook remained fiercely direct in his comments to analysts during the company's quarterly conference call, making no effort to play down his optimism of the company's direction or its contributions to the world, at one point responding to a question by confidently predicting "it's going to be an iPad Christmas."

Days of iPad

Cook's comment evoked similar statements made by Jobs, first when debuting the company's new tablet in 2010, which he called "the year of iPad."

One year later, Jobs rhetorically asked if 2011 would be the "year of the copycats" in presenting a slide portraying a series of competitors' logos that all turned out to be tablet failures that year, then predicted 2011 would actually be "the year of iPad 2," a model which, rather incredibly, the company still sells in volume today, nearly three years later.



Over those past three years, Apple has focused its iPad releases to occur in the fall, along with the company's iPhone and most new Mac introductions, and the annual new releases of iOS and OS X, all timed to coincide with the company's blockbuster holiday sales quarter.

Cook described Apple's September quarter as "a strong finish to an amazing [fiscal] year," noting that "Apple's business is stronger than ever."

"Products only Apple could have delivered"

"We're in the unique position of having world class hardware, software and service skills under one roof which enables us to provide an unparalleled user experience to hundreds of millions of customers," Cook added.

"Working with our vibrant developer community, we've built a large and thriving ecosystem. We're winning with our products in all the ways that are most important to us: in customer satisfaction, in product usage and in customer loyalty," Cook said, drawing a contrast with the market share and volume shipment or activation numbers focused upon by Apple's critics and competitors.

"Our relentless focus in providing innovation that enhances our customer's lives is evident in the extraordinary list of products that we've launched in just the last couple of months."

After recounting the company's recent product introductions and new software releases, Cook added, "all of these are products only Apple could have delivered. And most companies would be proud to have just one of them."

Over 221 million iOS devices in fiscal 2013

Over the past fiscal year, Cook noted that customers had purchased 150 million iPhones, 71 million iPads and 16 million Macs, generating revenues of $171 billion, earning $37 billion with an operating cash flow of $54 billion.



Cook also stated that Apple had invested over $8 billion in capital expenditures to "bolster our supply chain, expand our infrastructure and increase our retail footprint," having noted that Apple had nearly 400 million visitors to its 416 retail stores worldwide.

"We are continuing to invest in R&D and distribution, we are expanding our geographic coverage, and we are building upon a phenomenal but still very young retail store presence," Cook stated.

"Apple is making substantial contributions to society"

Cook also drew attention to a subject that Apple rarely emphasizes: its non-commercial footprint.

"We're also proud to be a force for good in the world beyond our products," Cook stated. "Whether it's improving working conditions or the environment, standing up for human rights, helping eliminate AIDS or reinventing education, Apple is making substantial contributions to society.""We're also proud to be a force for good in the world beyond our products" -Tim Cook

Cook didn't elaborate, but was clearly referencing Apple's trailblazing efforts to set and enforce much higher standards for workers and the environment than previously existed in China, which consumed much of the world's consumer electronics manufacturing before Apple even began building iPods.

Despite Apple's efforts, lazy journalists in the media have worked to vilify the company for reporting and working to terminate discovered issues, while so-called slactivists have tried to claim credit for the company's accomplishments.



Apple has also pioneered ambitious efforts to build the world's greenest data centers for iCloud, Maps, Siri and iTunes, using local biogas and solar plants to power high efficiency server installations.

Last month, U2 frontman Bono stated that Apple "is certainly leading the crew," noting that it has raised more than $65 million through Product(RED) to benefit The Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria.

Without making any reference to billionaire investors who have claimed to have his ear, Cook concluded, "I'd like to thank all of our customers and our long term shareholders for their loyalty, and I'd also like to thank Apple's many talented employees who have worked tirelessly to bring us this far and who are passionately focused on making great products that enrich people's lives."
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 31
    221.
  • Reply 2 of 31
    reydnreydn Posts: 73member
    I would say Apple's release schedule is strongly positioned - the only thing that could make it backfire is severe supply shortages leading right up to Christmas ...
  • Reply 3 of 31
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,778member
    Aa very long term share holder, I'd like to thank Tim, I appreciate his recognition of us long term share holders. Keep up the good work and let's have a great Christmas. :smokey:
  • Reply 4 of 31
    MacProMacPro Posts: 17,778member
    reydn wrote: »
    I would say Apple's release schedule is strongly positioned - the only thing that could make it backfire is severe supply shortages leading right up to Christmas ...

    Mentioning a possible shortage was smart and should guarantee a sell out! Even if there isn't a shortage. :D
  • Reply 5 of 31
    Nice slam on Icahn.

    Plus... 71 million iPads in this fiscal year? Holy crap!
  • Reply 6 of 31
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    Ben Thompson who used to work for Apple and Microsoft is getting a lot of attention for some blog posts he wrote about the iPad event. Basically he criticized Apple messaging around the iPad and thought the event was too focused on "speeds and feeds" and not enough on why iPad exists.

    This morning I listen to a podcast he did with Rene Ritchie from imore.com. He seemed to double down on this criticism even questioning whether things like multitasking and notifications should have been brought to the iPad. He also thought Apple was spending too much time on the Mac and expressed concern that Tim put the Mac guy (Federighi) in charge of iOS (I guess he forgot that Forstall worked on the Mac before he ran iOS).

    I think there are some valid criticisms of the event last week. And I think it would've been nice for Apple to show off what the iPad can do with this new 64-bit and motion co-processor technology. But I think dumbing down the iPad is a bad idea. It seems to me Apple is playing catch-up to the competition precisely because iOS was stagnant under Forstall. Even people who don't care for iOS 7 UI have to admit some very useful features were added that I don't think any of us would want taken away.

    I think it's entirely possible to make iPad a very useful device but still keeping it simple and not turning it into a PC. Hence why, in my opinion, we didn't see smart covers with a keyboard ala Microsoft. But I think consumers are smarter than we give them credit for and dumbing things down too much is just insulting their intelligence.
  • Reply 7 of 31
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post



    Ben Thompson who used to work for Apple and Microsoft is getting a lot of attention for some blog posts he wrote about the iPad event. Basically he criticized Apple messaging around the iPad and thought the event was too focused on "speeds and feeds" and not enough on why iPad exists.



    This morning I listen to a podcast he did with Rene Ritchie from imore.com. He seemed to double down on this criticism even questioning whether things like multitasking and notifications should have been brought to the iPad. He also thought Apple was spending too much time on the Mac and expressed concern that Tim put the Mac guy (Federighi) in charge of iOS (I guess he forgot that Forstall worked on the Mac before he ran iOS).



    I think there are some valid criticisms of the event last week. And I think it would've been nice for Apple to show off what the iPad can do with this new 64-bit and motion co-processor technology. But I think dumbing down the iPad is a bad idea. It seems to me Apple is playing catch-up to the competition precisely because iOS was stagnant under Forstall. Even people who don't care for iOS 7 UI have to admit some very useful features were added that I don't think any of us would want taken away.



    I think it's entirely possible to make iPad a very useful device but still keeping it simple and not turning it into a PC. Hence why, in my opinion, we didn't see smart covers with a keyboard ala Microsoft. But I think consumers are smarter than we give them credit for and dumbing things down too much is just insulting their intelligence.

    Well, one thing that stupid analysts can't understand, is that what this Ben Thompson says goes nicely along with this:

     

    "(...) used to work for Apple (...)"

     

    But this one is much worse and should be seen as a crime:



    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/03/magazine/why-apple-wants-to-bust-your-iphone.html?partner=rss&emc=rss&smid=tw-nytimes&_r=0

  • Reply 8 of 31
    koopkoop Posts: 337member
    "Despite Apple's efforts, lazy journalists in the media have worked to vilify the company for reporting and working to terminate discovered issues, while so-called slactivists have tried to claim credit for the company's accomplishments. "

    GROAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAN. Just threw up in my mouth a little.
  • Reply 9 of 31
    pazuzupazuzu Posts: 1,728member
    Here's hoping the iPad Air makes a great Christmas gift.
    Woz however wants a 256gb one. http://www.techweb.com/hardware/240163071/woz-doesn-t-like-new-ipads.html

    I'd like a black 32 WIFI. No carrier this time for me.
  • Reply 10 of 31
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    Well, one thing that stupid analysts can't understand, is that what this Ben Thompson says goes nicely along with this:

    "(...) used to work for Apple (...)"

    But this one is much worse and should be seen as a crime:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/03/magazine/why-apple-wants-to-bust-your-iphone.html?partner=rss&emc=rss&smid=tw-nytimes&_r=0

    Yeah I saw that. :no:

    MacRumors has a post up about an internal email Cook sent employees basically discussing the quarter and thanking them for all their hard work. The posts in that thread blow me away. One post after another about how Apple has nothing to be proud of, Cook shouldn't be thanking anyone blah blah blah. I'll bet all the money in my bank account that if one of these posters ever came in to contact with an Apple employee (executive or otherwise) they'd never say this shit to their face. Also, what do they want Cook to do? Tell his employees that they suck? Not thank them at all? I'm sure that would really motivate them to do good work. :rolleyes: Maybe Steve Jobs could get away with being a dick, but that doesn't work for most people. And there's no evidence employees worked better/harder under Jobs than they are under Cook.
  • Reply 11 of 31
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post





    Yeah I saw that. image



    MacRumors has a post up about an internal email Cook sent employees basically discussing the quarter and thanking them for all their hard work. The posts in that thread blow me away. One post after another about how Apple has nothing to be proud of, Cook shouldn't be thanking anyone blah blah blah. I'll bet all the money in my bank account that if one of these posters ever came in to contact with an Apple employee (executive or otherwise) they'd never say this shit to their face. Also, what do they want Cook to do? Tell his employees that they suck? Not thank them at all? I'm sure that would really motivate them to do good work. image Maybe Steve Jobs could get away with being a dick, but that doesn't work for most people. And there's no evidence employees worked better/harder under Jobs than they are under Cook.

     

    I must have read a different MacRumors.

  • Reply 12 of 31
    I've been solidly Mac at home and at work as well as when mobile for more than seven years now and have just bought a new Haswell iMac and "upgraded" it to Maverick - and lost my RSS feed in Safari and the ability to send a file by email from within Finder using the Services pain. I was going to get the free iWork apps too, but there are dozens of lost features in the freebie failures any one of which would be reason enough to not install. Just check out the wave of disappointment and threats of moving to Windows or Office on the Apple Discussions forums. Last I heard there were over 50,000 reads and tens of pages of comments!

    As a result, I am not sure Tim or Apple can claim to have "world class software" any more. The only thing it now seems to be better than is Fisher Price or V-Tech. And it's the iPads fault - by inventing a new device category, but getting confused about it being similar to a PC (it's not, people use them very differently - at least, I do) Apple's idea to copy the codebase ideas into OS X has resulted in the dumbing down of iWork and OS X, which will push users away.

    For me, no way can I leave Snow Leopard behind for office use. And yet Snow Leopard cannot sync calendars with iCloud - one of the main reasons I am using Macs and iPhones at home and at work is to be able to work seriously on the Macs without needing any Microsoft software at all and keep up to date with diary, emails and contacts wherever I go.

    Now I am seriously thinking about office - and I have never taken to it or liked it or used it before, but getting rid of Mail Merge from Address Book if in not total in Pages, or being able to edit while in print view, or losing the blue guidelines for layout purposes (which I use all the time) and the fine tuning capabilities in OS X and, and, and....

    Apple may have the capability to write world leading software, but they are instead choosing to dumb everything down in a patronising insult to the intelligence of their users.
  • Reply 13 of 31

    I have no problem with Apple being "a force for good in the world", if they would only ask NSA to go **** themselves. Otherwise I agree with the good Cook.

  • Reply 14 of 31
    "Over 321 million iOS devices in fiscal 2013


    Over the past fiscal year, Cook noted that customers had purchased 150 million iPhones, 71 million iPads"

    I'm assuming the 321 million (which is in large type face), should be "221", otherwise with 150M iphones and 71M ipads, they are 100M short somewhere.
  • Reply 15 of 31
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tangey View Post



    "Over 321 million iOS devices in fiscal 2013





    Over the past fiscal year, Cook noted that customers had purchased 150 million iPhones, 71 million iPads"



    I'm assuming the 321 million (which is in large type face), should be "221", otherwise with 150M iphones and 71M ipads, they are 100M short somewhere.

     

    (see post #2)

  • Reply 16 of 31
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,569member
    rogifan wrote: »
    Ben Thompson who used to work for Apple and Microsoft is getting a lot of attention for some blog posts he wrote about the iPad event. Basically he criticized Apple messaging around the iPad and thought the event was too focused on "speeds and feeds" and not enough on why iPad exists.

    This morning I listen to a podcast he did with Rene Ritchie from imore.com. He seemed to double down on this criticism even questioning whether things like multitasking and notifications should have been brought to the iPad. He also thought Apple was spending too much time on the Mac and expressed concern that Tim put the Mac guy (Federighi) in charge of iOS (I guess he forgot that Forstall worked on the Mac before he ran iOS).

    I think there are some valid criticisms of the event last week. And I think it would've been nice for Apple to show off what the iPad can do with this new 64-bit and motion co-processor technology. But I think dumbing down the iPad is a bad idea. It seems to me Apple is playing catch-up to the competition precisely because iOS was stagnant under Forstall. Even people who don't care for iOS 7 UI have to admit some very useful features were added that I don't think any of us would want taken away.

    I think it's entirely possible to make iPad a very useful device but still keeping it simple and not turning it into a PC. Hence why, in my opinion, we didn't see smart covers with a keyboard ala Microsoft. But I think consumers are smarter than we give them credit for and dumbing things down too much is just insulting their intelligence.

    1. We already know why the iPad exists. That was explained in 2010.
    2. We know what the iPad can do already.
    3. The iPad is already useful to a lot of people.
  • Reply 17 of 31
    pmzpmz Posts: 3,433member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post



    Ben Thompson who used to work for Apple and Microsoft is getting a lot of attention for some blog posts he wrote about the iPad event. Basically he criticized Apple messaging around the iPad and thought the event was too focused on "speeds and feeds" and not enough on why iPad exists.



    This morning I listen to a podcast he did with Rene Ritchie from imore.com. He seemed to double down on this criticism even questioning whether things like multitasking and notifications should have been brought to the iPad. He also thought Apple was spending too much time on the Mac and expressed concern that Tim put the Mac guy (Federighi) in charge of iOS (I guess he forgot that Forstall worked on the Mac before he ran iOS).



    I think there are some valid criticisms of the event last week. And I think it would've been nice for Apple to show off what the iPad can do with this new 64-bit and motion co-processor technology. But I think dumbing down the iPad is a bad idea. It seems to me Apple is playing catch-up to the competition precisely because iOS was stagnant under Forstall. Even people who don't care for iOS 7 UI have to admit some very useful features were added that I don't think any of us would want taken away.



    I think it's entirely possible to make iPad a very useful device but still keeping it simple and not turning it into a PC. Hence why, in my opinion, we didn't see smart covers with a keyboard ala Microsoft. But I think consumers are smarter than we give them credit for and dumbing things down too much is just insulting their intelligence.

     

    People are on crack. The iPad is good. It is perfectly positioned. These iPad updates over yesterday are insane. Performance beasts. A mini with Retina Display. Give me a break. They've never been better, and there is nothing better on the market. No where even remotely close.

     

    I'm not the least bit interested in anyone who dismisses them or goes to great length to criticize them, because they're wrong. You have to do substantial mental gymnastics to paint a bad picture around iPad, in any way. That doesn't deserve attention.

  • Reply 18 of 31
    Mentioning a possible shortage was smart and should guarantee a sell out! Even if there isn't a shortage. :D

    Apple's signature marketing technique ;-)
  • Reply 19 of 31
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    I must have read a different MacRumors.
    You obviously didn't read that thread then.
  • Reply 20 of 31
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    pmz wrote: »
    People are on crack. The iPad is good. It is perfectly positioned. These iPad updates over yesterday are insane. Performance beasts. A mini with Retina Display. Give me a break. They've never been better, and there is nothing better on the market. No where even remotely close.

    I'm not the least bit interested in anyone who dismisses them or goes to great length to criticize them, because they're wrong. You have to do substantial mental gymnastics to paint a bad picture around iPad, in any way. That doesn't deserve attention.
    I was with Thompson until he started to question some of the features brought to the iPad like notifications and multitasking. Seriously?

    One interesting thing he did say is when he was an Apple intern he got to meet all the executives (I believe all interns do) and he referred to Forstall as "arrogant"; someone who wants you to know they know they're the smartest person in the room. Kind of provides a reason as to why he might have been fired. Perhaps Jobs was able to keep Forstall's arrogance in check but once he died there was no one to do so. The other execs at Apple don't really come across as arrogant so I can see where Forstall might not have been a good cultural fit with Jobs gone.
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