J.D. Power ranks Samsung tablets better than iPad entirely due to cost

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  • Reply 141 of 219
    dnd0psdnd0ps Posts: 253member
    *cough* bribes*cough*
  • Reply 142 of 219
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jpmia View Post



    so a hyundai is better than a BMW/Porsche becouse is cheaper? thats rediculos

    Unequivocally, yes.

  • Reply 143 of 219
    During the survey period, Apple sold (through to customers) 28-30 million iPads (2011 and 2012 models). Samsung shipped 16-17 million tablets.

    I wonder how the 3,375 tablet owners were selected for the study...

    Not sure what you're getting at. The iPad soundly trounced the competition in each individual category except in price. It's the final ranking that doesn't quite add up.


    Let's just assume that buyers of Sammy tablets and Apple tablets are equally satisfied with their choices.

    Then, almost twice as many iPads were sold through to end-users during the survey period.

    Wouldn't it be realistic to assume that study population should include almost twice as many iPad users as SammyTab users.

    Then, wouldn't rating the percent of each population's answers to the questions yield more valid results?
  • Reply 144 of 219
    genovellegenovelle Posts: 1,480member
    Am I the only one who finds the timing of this survey a bit interesting.
  • Reply 145 of 219
    genovellegenovelle Posts: 1,480member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by leavingthebigG View Post



    If JD Powers ever decides to explain how its published scoring somehow made Samsung the winner instead of Apple, I would be interested in reading the explanation.



    As others have pointed out, Samsung scored 3.62 while Apple scored 4.52. IF JD Powers had scored Samsung with a 5 for cost and Apple a 0 then Samsung would have won by 1 point, but this is not what happened.



    A crazy question is why do companies go out of their way to promote Samsung as better or equal to Apple when their own published reports state otherwise? And why do it immediately preceding a new Apple product?



    In closing for now, the NYT article about Apple's planned obsolescence hatchet job should be rewritten to replace every Apple reference with Google since Google announced today it's own Nexus tablet will not get Android 4.4 for being too old of a device.



    The author's iPhone 4, a three years old device, can run iOS 7 without all features is slammed as planned obsolescence while a 1.5 years old tablet device will not be supported at all. Which company is purposely implementing planned obsolescence? I doubt the NYT will authorize such a story until Google becomes the hatchet job target.

    Google pays these sites to much money from ads for them to anger them.

  • Reply 146 of 219
    evilutionevilution Posts: 1,399member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post

     
    only cost matters



     

    Samsung have 23 spots on that chart.

    Apple have 27 spots.

    How can they say that Samsung have won?

     

    Surely you pay more for higher results in all the other categories.

  • Reply 147 of 219
    thewbthewb Posts: 79member
    I stopped paying attention to J.D. Power the first time they gave a customer satisfaction award to my cable provider.
  • Reply 148 of 219
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,385member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TheWB View Post



    I stopped paying attention to J.D. Power the first time they gave a customer satisfaction award to my cable provider.

    Any of these customer satisfaction surveys are based on the criteria and sample size and results. I wouldn't even use cost as a factor because it's not a consideration when the price of the products are so close to one another.  One product being $50 to $100 difference is not a big deal when dealing with products at that price level. As long as I can afford either product, cost is not an issue.  It's everything else that's important.

     

    I just go by my own experiences.  I had the luxury many years ago to be involved with several large corp resellers of computer equipment  and a large amount of customers (number of users) and observing what our company saw within the industry and my own personal experiences between Windows and Macs during a 15 year period and that's why I decided to abandon Windows for OS X.  

     

    As far as Android or Samsung is concerned, I won't touch that platform. It has several inherent flaws.  1.  Updating the OEM version of the OS is awful (no one uses the latest OS for at least 6 months after the release amongst the OEM) and the Android platform just doesn't have the same apps/3rd party products that are also used in combination.  I also have some friends that complain far more with Android/Samsung products than with Apple iOS based products.  That's enough for me.

  • Reply 149 of 219
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,385member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Evilution View Post

     

    Samsung have 23 spots on that chart.

    Apple have 27 spots.

    How can they say that Samsung have won?

     

    Surely you pay more for higher results in all the other categories.


    Because they weighted the cost more than the other, rather than just using equal weighting, or someone doesn't know how to count.

  • Reply 150 of 219
    elehcdnelehcdn Posts: 388member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by drblank View Post

     

    Any of these customer satisfaction surveys are based on the criteria and sample size and results. I wouldn't even use cost as a factor because it's not a consideration when the price of the products are so close to one another.  One product being $50 to $100 difference is not a big deal when dealing with products at that price level. As long as I can afford either product, cost is not an issue.  It's everything else that's important.


    I think it's important to remember a few factors here:

      1. This is a survey of people who have already bought the product.

      2. Android buyers tend to be techies who have already done a lot of research and know exactly what they are buying. iPad buyers may be techie, but they can just as easily be someone with little technical knowledge. Buyers that have researched and know what they are buying are probably going to be more satisfied than someone who only has a general idea of what a tablet is supposed to do.

      3. These are all relatively new customers - most people aren't going to say that their new toy is too complicated or underperforming, but they may be willing to say that they think it is expensive. There's a little bit of prestige there btw, techies are more likely to be proud that they have done their shopping and didn't overpay, whereas the "bling" factor for non-techies is often that they spent more for the "cool" device.

      4. Again, these are buyers in the first year of ownership. Being techie, more Android purchasers are probably willing to buy a new device every year at the refresh. Non-techies are more likely to buy the device and keep it longer. Who gets the better value? ... the person who hangs on to the device for 2 or 3 years, but they are more likely to think that a tablet is an expensive device as opposed to someone who is conditioned to buy at every refresh.

     

    It's easy to see how JD Power could end up with these results even without intentionally screwing with the data. But as I mentioned before, surveys tell more about the questioner and the questions than the answers. If you wanted to get the opposite answer, it would be easy enough to prime the survey by asking how long the purchaser planned to own the device before asking if they thought it was good value. Not only would it provide more accurate data - that iPads tend to be useful longer, but it would also trigger the thought in the respondents that if they had a device that they were going to hold onto longer (or that maintained its resale price better) maybe they wouldn't think it was so expensive.

  • Reply 151 of 219
    Let's just assume that buyers of Sammy tablets and Apple tablets are equally satisfied with their choices.

    Then, almost twice as many iPads were sold through to end-users during the survey period.

    Wouldn't it be realistic to assume that study population should include almost twice as many iPad users as SammyTab users.

    Then, wouldn't rating the percent of each population's answers to the questions yield more valid results?

    Are you saying the scoring should be normalized within a tablet's population before comparing rating between tablets?
  • Reply 152 of 219

    "The market researcher takes into account five key factors: performance, ease of use, styling/design, features and price; based on a 1,000 point-scale, Samsung's overall score was 835, while Apple's offerings netted 833, and 826 for Amazon. Just saying....the title claims otherwise. Endgadgets take on it fyi.

     

    I personally have never been impressed with samsung tablets but my opinion is just one opinion.

  • Reply 153 of 219
    charlituna wrote: »
    customers don't think like that. They do think cost=price

    but still. come someone explain this math to me. Exactly how can Apple get 5 points on all but one area and get second place. I am just not seeing the math here

    Actually, many consumers balance look and feel, usability, reliability and utility against cost to determine the relative cost of purchasing an item. If the differences in the non-price criteria are significant, they will often opt for a more expensive item.

    Example: buy a $50 pair of item you can wear for a year or more or buy a $17 item that you have to replace every 3 months?
  • Reply 154 of 219
    Originally Posted by macaholic_1948 View Post

    Example: buy a $50 pair of item you can wear for a year or more or buy a $17 item that you have to replace every 3 months?



    Only rich people can afford cheap windows.

  • Reply 155 of 219
    Sigh...

    We had 7 times more trick-or-treaters than Obamacare...
  • Reply 156 of 219
    Originally Posted by Dick Applebaum View Post

    Sigh...



    We had 7 times more trick-or-treaters than Obamacare...

     

    Wait, you live next door to Obamacare? Do you help it rake its leaves? I imagine that even though it’s 2,000 pages, it would have trouble in high winds.

  • Reply 157 of 219
    And how come there's nothing worse than at least 2 points ("the rest")? No bad optics in charts, eh?
  • Reply 158 of 219
    <span style="line-height:1.4em;">Sigh...</span>



    We had 7 times more trick-or-treaters than Obamacare...

    Wait, you live next door to Obamacare? Do you help it rake its leaves? I imagine that even though it’s 2,000 pages, it would have trouble in high winds.

    My sadness is for the very few number of trick-or-treaters... End of a very happy tradition...
  • Reply 159 of 219

    Only rich people can afford cheap windows.

    True. But what you can afford and what you buy are not always the same. Current cash availability often trumps long-term cost when you lack cash to pay for the lower long-term cost.
  • Reply 160 of 219
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,385member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by elehcdn View Post

     

    I think it's important to remember a few factors here:

      1. This is a survey of people who have already bought the product.

      2. Android buyers tend to be techies who have already done a lot of research and know exactly what they are buying. iPad buyers may be techie, but they can just as easily be someone with little technical knowledge. Buyers that have researched and know what they are buying are probably going to be more satisfied than someone who only has a general idea of what a tablet is supposed to do.

      3. These are all relatively new customers - most people aren't going to say that their new toy is too complicated or underperforming, but they may be willing to say that they think it is expensive. There's a little bit of prestige there btw, techies are more likely to be proud that they have done their shopping and didn't overpay, whereas the "bling" factor for non-techies is often that they spent more for the "cool" device.

      4. Again, these are buyers in the first year of ownership. Being techie, more Android purchasers are probably willing to buy a new device every year at the refresh. Non-techies are more likely to buy the device and keep it longer. Who gets the better value? ... the person who hangs on to the device for 2 or 3 years, but they are more likely to think that a tablet is an expensive device as opposed to someone who is conditioned to buy at every refresh.

     

    It's easy to see how JD Power could end up with these results even without intentionally screwing with the data. But as I mentioned before, surveys tell more about the questioner and the questions than the answers. If you wanted to get the opposite answer, it would be easy enough to prime the survey by asking how long the purchaser planned to own the device before asking if they thought it was good value. Not only would it provide more accurate data - that iPads tend to be useful longer, but it would also trigger the thought in the respondents that if they had a device that they were going to hold onto longer (or that maintained its resale price better) maybe they wouldn't think it was so expensive.


    Techies?  NOPE. Only a small portion of the Android users are techies.  There are only about 5 Million registered XDA Developers and the Android geeks are typically XDA freaks that root their OS.  NONE of the Android users that I know I would classify as a techie geek.  One THOUGHT he was, but even he didn't even know what the latest release of Android was.  I think that assessment is just not a good one.

    Most of the Android users fall into one of a couple categories.  1.  They don't have any money and buy the cheapest thing they can get (hence the large user base of outdated 2.X phones (about 30% of the install base)  2.  Want a large screen model.   3.  or just think that market share is the deciding factor on buying a platform.   I see a LOT of these "techies" are actually collectors of Android products, so one of them can actually own 5 or 6 or more phones at a time. So the number of unique Android users is probably a LOT lower than the number of active phones/tablets. Techies are also typically people that don't always use mainstream apps, they are more likely going to hack the OS to do things a normal person wouldn't do, root their phone and throw other OSs on it, and spend more time playing around with the device than a productivity tool.

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