Apple's second 'your verse' story focuses on iPad in mountaineering

Posted:
in iPad edited February 2014
Apple on Tuesday expanded its "your verse" iPad media campaign by adding a second story to its dedicated mini site, this time highlighting the tablet's use in professional mountain climbing.

Mountaineering
Adrian Ballinger and Emily Harrington use Apple's iPad to scale the world's highest peaks. | Source: Apple


Following up on the underwater exploration vignette that launched alongside the "your verse" TV ad, Apple's latest post shows how mountaineers Adrian Ballinger and Emily Harrington use the iPad to navigate the world's highest peaks.

From the webpage:
In exploring frigid and unforgiving altitudes that most humans visit only in the comfort of a pressurized jet cabin, one piece of equipment has become essential to them: their iPad.
Apple explains the duo uses the iPad and the Gaia GPS topography app to map out climbs, study terrain, plot routes and decide where to camp.

"Five years ago, it was hard to even get a paper map of these places," Ballinger said. "Now with the iPad it's remarkable how much we can plan ahead."

Ballinger and Harrington also use their iPad's communications capabilities to blog, post photos and connect with people via social media. This real-time story telling would be next to impossible without the iPad. In addition, the iPad's GPS functionality helps to "chronicle," or verify, a climb for government agencies and mountaineering organizations.

In a routine climb, the iPad is used in almost every stage of ascent, from setting up base camp to reaching the summit. As the route progresses, available oxygen levels decrease, meaning tools and equipment must be continuously pared down along the way until only the essentials are being toted. The iPad is included in the pack used to summit the mountain and, aside from a radio, is the only electronic device that makes it to the top.

With the iPad, the pair's expeditions have been made a bit safer, allowing them to try new routes and explore more remote places, Ballinger said.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 55
    Operating temperature: 32° to 95° F (0° to 35° C)
    Nonoperating temperature: -4° to 113° F (-20° to 45° C)

    Modified iPads because of the technical aspects?
  • Reply 2 of 55
    Though not in the list of tech specs, if I recall, there is an altitude limit of about 10000 ft.
  • Reply 3 of 55
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    Ok I love Apple's new design language on their website but that top navigation bar needs to be redone. It doesn't fit in with the new design language at all. The heavy, glossy look is so 8-10 years ago.

    [IMG]http://i59.tinypic.com/2wpnm7a.jpg[/IMG]
  • Reply 4 of 55
    takeotakeo Posts: 416member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post



    Ok I love Apple's new design language on their website but that top navigation bar needs to be redone. It doesn't fit in with the new design language at all. The heavy, glossy look is so 8-10 years ago.

     

    Yah because the most important thing in design is to slavishly follow trends ;)

  • Reply 5 of 55
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    takeo wrote: »
    Yah because the most important thing in design is to slavishly follow trends ;)
    Um because it doesn't fit with the rest of their design language on the site? It just looks out of place. And personally I was never really a fan of Apple's website in the past. I don't see them following trends right now but rather finally implementing good design (apart from the out of place nav bar).
  • Reply 6 of 55
    Though not in the list of tech specs, if I recall, there is an altitude limit of about 10000 ft.

    MR user post:
    It says 10 000 ft but don't planes usually go above this. Will my iPad be usable on the plane??

    'No comment'
  • Reply 7 of 55
    muppetrymuppetry Posts: 3,328member
    Though not in the list of tech specs, if I recall, there is an altitude limit of about 10000 ft.

    Not sure about that. I regularly use my iPads above 10,000 ft with no problems.
  • Reply 8 of 55
    muppetrymuppetry Posts: 3,328member
    philboogie wrote: »
    Though not in the list of tech specs, if I recall, there is an altitude limit of about 10000 ft.

    MR user post:
    It says 10 000 ft but don't planes usually go above this. Will my iPad be usable on the plane??

    'No comment'

    No doubt the question was about commercial, but general aviation rules do allow cabin pressure altitudes much higher than 10,000 ft.
  • Reply 9 of 55
    peteopeteo Posts: 356member

    Love that apple highlighted this use of the iPad. I have been using the iPad a hiking gps ever since the iPad 2 came out. Its really one of the best hiking gps's you can buy. When the iPad 3 with retina display came out I ditched my dedicated Delorme GPS and iPad became my go to gps. iPad mini just reinforced this and now iPad mini rentia I think its the holly grail of hiking tools so far.

    The battery is amazing. Can track my hike for a couple of days. (delorme would last 1 day at most)The ease of using your finger (or touch screen gloves) to move around the map, select points see your stats is light years beyond those clunky buttons you see on most hiking gps's 

    I've been a free beta tester for the app they feature, Gaia gps. Its awesome. Unlimited topo maps (plus lots of other kinds of maps), can search for points Of interest on the map, track your hike & stats, load other hikes (gpx format), take pictures pinned to the map and most importantly can download maps for off the grid use. There's also a ton of other apps use can use for hiking and a ton of accessories that make your iPad waterproof, crash resistant, cold temp use etc.. 

    iPad mini rentia + these apps easily make it one of the best hiking gps and has saved my ass a few times when I either couldn't see where I was going, or took a wrong turn. (I always bring a paper map as back up)

    I've used my iPad in below 0 temps before and have not had an issue yet. (though I keep it in my back pack until I need/want to use it)

     

    Theres also the bonus of being able to watch a movie or listen to music when you're down for the night and if you have cell signal, (more common than you would think) you can facetime/skype with your family/friends, pretty amazing 

  • Reply 10 of 55
    dnd0psdnd0ps Posts: 253member

    Samsung's gonna clone this. I can already see it in my head, they'll have posters, adverts and huge banners titled "Your S"..... oh wait...

  • Reply 11 of 55
    dnd0ps wrote: »
    Samsung's gonna clone this. I can already see it in my head, they'll have posters, adverts and huge banners titled "Your S"..... oh wait...

    "...Sverse"?
  • Reply 12 of 55
    rogifan wrote: »
    Ok I love Apple's new design language on their website but that top navigation bar needs to be redone. It doesn't fit in with the new design language at all. The heavy, glossy look is so 8-10 years ago.

    2wpnm7a.jpg

    Apple needs to ensure they have sufficient space to add the new product categories as well. I wonder if iPod will be removed as a top level device category this year. iPod unit sales have dropped 52% YoY from 12,769,000 to 6,049,000.
  • Reply 13 of 55

    I'm sorry but everyone says the iPad is a toy and not useful for doing anything except playing Angry Birds.  They should have used a Microsoft Surface with MS Office and then they could have really done a professional job.  MS Office always comes in handy when climbing mountains especially if you need to make up a quick spreadsheet or Powerpoint presentation to show people when you get back to base camp.

  • Reply 14 of 55
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    Apple needs to ensure they have sufficient space to add the new product categories as well. I wonder if iPod will be removed as a top level device category this year. iPod unit sales have dropped 52% YoY from 12,769,000 to 6,049,000.
    Yes. Perhaps new categories will force them to update the nav bar design. Go to apple.com and the site looks so nice with the background and thinner white text over it. That heavy gray nav bar kind of ruins the effect.
  • Reply 15 of 55
    fracfrac Posts: 480member
    philboogie wrote: »
    Operating temperature: 32° to 95° F (0° to 35° C)
    Nonoperating temperature: -4° to 113° F (-20° to 45° C)

    Modified iPads because of the technical aspects?

    Dunno, but on a trip to South Georgia Island, the day temp was average -12C. I bought a backpack with a slide-in compartment that hugs the small of the back. I didn't use it with an iPad, but one would have fitted there and kept quite warm. I kept my iPhone under my hat...apparently you lose a lot of heat from there, and it was fine. :rolleyes:

    Anyways, those limitations are just to cover Apple's ass come warranty claims and in no way limit it's actual possible use in extreme conditions
  • Reply 16 of 55
    frac wrote: »
    I kept my iPhone under my hat...apparently you lose a lot of heat from there, and it was fine.

    That is indeed what I was told in a camping equipment store, and was told to wear a hat while sleeping. I believe that was the tipping point for me and I booked hotels all over the country to avoid hat wearing hassle.
    Anyways, those limitations are just to cover Apple's ass come warranty claims and in no way limit it's actual possible use in extreme conditions

    According to reader/poster kdarling the 10,000 ft limitation was set due to HDD's, but his post was years before the iPad was out. But I agree, limited liability could be it. Still, in their defence, they swap a seemingly broken device with a new one very easily. Or at least, here in The Netherlands.
  • Reply 17 of 55
    peteo wrote: »
    Love that apple highlighted this use of the iPad. I have been using the iPad a hiking gps ever since the iPad 2 came out. Its really one of the best hiking gps's you can buy. When the iPad 3 with retina display came out I ditched my dedicated Delorme GPS and iPad became my go to gps. iPad mini just reinforced this and now iPad mini rentia I think its the holly grail of hiking tools so far.

    The battery is amazing. Can track my hike for a couple of days. (delorme would last 1 day at most)The ease of using your finger (or touch screen gloves) to move around the map, select points see your stats is light years beyond those clunky buttons you see on most hiking gps's 
    I've been a free beta tester for the app they feature, Gaia gps. Its awesome. Unlimited topo maps (plus lots of other kinds of maps), can search for points Of interest on the map, track your hike & stats, load other hikes (gpx format), take pictures pinned to the map and most importantly can download maps for off the grid use. There's also a ton of other apps use can use for hiking and a ton of accessories that make your iPad waterproof, crash resistant, cold temp use etc.. 
    iPad mini rentia + these apps easily make it one of the best hiking gps and has saved my ass a few times when I either couldn't see where I was going, or took a wrong turn. (I always bring a paper map as back up)
    I've used my iPad in below 0 temps before and have not had an issue yet. (though I keep it in my back pack until I need/want to use it)

    Theres also the bonus of being able to watch a movie or listen to music when you're down for the night and if you have cell signal, (more common than you would think) you can facetime/skype with your family/friends, pretty amazing 


    What apps do you use for hiking?
  • Reply 18 of 55
    philboogie wrote: »
    That is indeed what I was told in a camping equipment store, and was told to wear a hat while sleeping. I believe that was the tipping point for me and I booked hotels all over the country to avoid hat wearing hassle.
    According to reader/poster kdarling the 10,000 ft limitation was set due to HDD's, but his post was years before the iPad was out. But I agree, limited liability could be it. Still, in their defence, they swap a seemingly broken device with a new one very easily. Or at least, here in The Netherlands.

    Although approximately 15% of an individual's blood volume is in the head at any given moment and the scalp is extremely exposed to the elements; heat loss through the head is only approximately 10%. The key is exposed surface area; heat loss is relatively similar for any exposed region of the body.

    I believe the argument is that if an individual doesn't wear a proper head covering then 50% - 70% of heat loss may occur through the head assuming that the individual is otherwise properly dressed.
  • Reply 19 of 55
    peteopeteo Posts: 356member

    "What apps do you use for hiking?"

     

     

    Gaia GPS is my main app. Also use Peaks (point it to the skyline and it will tell you what mountains you are looking at), theodolite (get stats for what your are looking at) , alltrails (great to find local hikes), Maps 3D (Uses nasa DEM info to create cool 3D topo maps, gives you an idea of the height of mountain and trails)

  • Reply 20 of 55
    ^ post

    Informative; thanks
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