Google Drive slashes paid storage prices, turning up the heat on rival Dropbox

Posted:
in General Discussion edited March 2014
Google on Thursday announced drastic price reductions for its paid Drive subscriptions, with 100 gigabytes of cloud storage now costing just $1.99 a month, and 1 terabyte of data available for $9.99 per month, significantly undercutting the prices of rival Dropbox.



Google Drive already offered lower pricing than Dropbox, but the difference between the two services is now even greater: For individual Dropbox users, 100 gigabytes of cloud data runs $8.25 per month when billed annually, or $9.99 per month on a month-by-month basis. A 200-gigabyte Dropbox account runs $16.60 per month billed annually, while 500 gigabytes is $41.60.

Previously, Google charged $4.99 per month for 100 gigabytes and $49.99 per month for one terabyte, but with both now slashed to $1.99 and $9.99 per month, respectively, they are significantly cheaper. The search giant also offers storage levels of 10 terabytes and higher starting at $99.99 per month.

Google Drive also offers 15 gigabytes of complimentary cloud storage for free. That's a higher amount than Dropbox's starting 2 gigabytes, though that number can be increased through various methods, including referrals.

Dropbox is the current leader in the cloud file storage business, serving as the default storage and sharing platform for many. The service is available cross-platform, with dedicated applications available for Apple's OS X and iOS, as well as Microsoft Windows and Google's Android.

Google Drive


Dropbox was allegedly offered a nine-figure buyout by Apple as part of a personal pitch from late CEO Steve Jobs in 2009. That offer was rejected, and Apple ultimately went on to introduce its own iCloud service in 2011 which takes a different approach, focusing on seamlessly syncing data in the background rather than dealing with traditional file structures as Dropbox, Google Drive and others do.

Like Dropbox, Google Drive also has its own application for Apple's iOS, as well as an OS X desktop client. The service is also integrated with third-party applications such as VLC.

Other cloud storage solutions compatible with Apple's platforms include Box, Microsoft's newly rebranded OneDrive, and SugarSync. A Box personal account comes with 10 gigabytes for free, OneDrive includes 7 gigabytes of free storage, and SugarSync recently transitioned to a paid-only model.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 97
    plovellplovell Posts: 818member
    Yeah but - Dropbox doesn't scan your data and make use of that.
  • Reply 2 of 97
    red oakred oak Posts: 886member

    Steve tried to convince Dropbox that file storage was a feature and not a standalone product.  Dropbox is going to learn that lesson the hard way as storage goes towards free over time

     

    I would not be surprised if Apple doubles free iCloud storage to 10GB at WWDC  

  • Reply 3 of 97
    toukaletoukale Posts: 37member

    Not sure if dropbox will be able to hold on to their lead once the big boys like google and microsoft really starts to go after that market. It's only a matter of time before google starts to offer a free 100gb and at that point what will dropbox do? Microsoft, will not go that far but their pricing will be a lot more competitive than dropbox, that's for sure. Dropbox does not have other business that can help them support their cloud so they will suffer and lose their first mover advantage in the long run.

  • Reply 4 of 97
    bregaladbregalad Posts: 816member
    If it seems too cheap to be true... you are the product not the customer.
  • Reply 5 of 97
    bradipaobradipao Posts: 145member
    red oak wrote: »
    Steve tried to convince Dropbox that file storage was a feature and not a standalone product.

    Even if implemented as a feature, must be multi-platform. Being platform-agnostic is the key of success of DropBox.
  • Reply 6 of 97
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,317member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bradipao View Post





    Even if implemented as a feature, must be multi-platform. Being platform-agnostic is the key of success of DropBox.

     

    iCloud will never be multiplatform. It would in no way benefit's Apple's model, which is to increase the value of hardware through software features and ecosystem. iCloud is deeply integrated into all iOS devices (and OSX), the point of which is to make syncing of data seamless and configuration free. There's no way they can just "add" iCloud to Android, as an app, as it's a core part of iOS. And even if they could, it would be pointless. Apple doesn't make money through cloud services and selling your data. It does so through hardware sales. Google's business model, on the other hand, is advertising- which is completely dependant on being platform agnostic. 

  • Reply 7 of 97
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Red Oak View Post

    I would not be surprised if Apple doubles free iCloud storage to 10GB at WWDC  


    Meh. Unless it's at least 25GB free, with the option to purchase up to a TB, I would find it uninteresting and unimpressive.

  • Reply 8 of 97
    Deleted (should have read article first!).
  • Reply 9 of 97
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member

    I’ve been wondering something recently.

     

    Go back to 1994. 1GB drives were huge. Basically the largest available, right?

    Fast forward to 2004. 1TB drives had just come out. 1000x larger.

    And now in 2014, we have… 4TB. Where are our Petabyte drives? What happened here? I mean, even 10TB  seems like a meaningful thought, but nothing. Nada.

     

    So Google being able to offer up this amount of storage seems insane. Think of the sheer number of drives! Think of the amount of physical space required! And I guess they assume the service will be used for at least a year per person, because terabyte drives are still $100.

  • Reply 10 of 97
    adonissmuadonissmu Posts: 1,774member

    Apple should compete here. Google Drive is where everyone is going. Apple has better security so I prefer it when I need my information to be secure. 

     

    Google wants to scan your data so they can take your ideas and make money off of them before you can. That is in addition to advertising. 

  • Reply 11 of 97
    gtrgtr Posts: 3,231member
    I'm sorry, but as long as Google Drive's terms and conditions state that they can do whatever they want with any data you upload then they will never be used by me.

    However, Dropbox's 2GB free storage is starting got look pretty stingy in 2014.
  • Reply 12 of 97
    schlackschlack Posts: 708member
    just wait for yahoo to acquire dropbox to get a foot in the door.
  • Reply 13 of 97
    droidftwdroidftw Posts: 1,009member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AdonisSMU View Post


    Google wants to scan your data so they can take your ideas and make money off of them before you can.

     

    Any evidence of this ever happening?  Where does this stuff come from?

  • Reply 14 of 97
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 2,446member

    I wouldn't use Google Drive if it came with 100TB of free storage... As if I want them digging through that much of my data?

  • Reply 15 of 97
    schlackschlack Posts: 708member
    They probably have triple redundancy on their data. 2 hot drives and 1 cold.
    So if a 1TB drive costs $100, that's $100x3 = $300.
    Over a 5 yr life of the drive, the racks, mounts, processors, hardware, facilities, bandwidth, etc probably cost at least as much, say $300/TB.

    That's $600/TB over 5 yrs.
    $10/month x 5 yrs = $600

    Is this a break even effort for ecosystem growth?
  • Reply 16 of 97
    tundraboytundraboy Posts: 1,768member

    Yeah but what are Google's "no peek" prices?  What's that?  Oh, they don't offer that option.  Oh, right.

  • Reply 17 of 97
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,001member
    droidftw wrote: »
    Any evidence of this ever happening?  Where does this stuff come from?

    It comes from this.

    http://www.pcworld.com/article/254638/should_you_worry_about_google_drive_privacy_.html
  • Reply 18 of 97
    tundraboytundraboy Posts: 1,768member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AdonisSMU View Post


    Google wants to scan your data so they can take your ideas and make money off of them before you can.

     

    Any evidence of this ever happening?  Where does this stuff come from?


     

    I don't know.  Ask Apple about Android.

  • Reply 19 of 97
    genovellegenovelle Posts: 1,265member
    droidftw wrote: »
    Any evidence of this ever happening?  Where does this stuff come from?
    If you listen to any interview with their execs. They tell you that they scan all data even google voice calls and voice mail. It's sliding right up to the creepy line without crossing it as one of them famously said. Nothing is free. If they weren't scanning it what would they gain, brownie points. That's not how they make their Billions.
  • Reply 20 of 97
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by schlack View Post



    They probably have triple redundancy on their data. 2 hot drives and 1 cold.

    So if a 1TB drive costs $100, that's $100x3 = $300.

    Over a 5 yr life of the drive, the racks, mounts, processors, hardware, facilities, bandwidth, etc probably cost at least as much, say $300/TB.



    That's $600/TB over 5 yrs.

    $10/month x 5 yrs = $600



    Is this a break even effort for ecosystem growth?

     

    1TB drives are much less than 100.00. Furthermore Google would be buying drives at wholesale prices. 

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