Google prepping 'Android TV' set-top box with stripped-down interface, voice input and notifications

1234568»

Comments

  • Reply 141 of 152
    splifsplif Posts: 603member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post





    I know that they weren't the only tablet available, but most people don't know tablets existed before the iPad. Low end has become synonymous with cheap crap, but in the purest definition of the saying it's just the lowest end. A airplane that's 35,000 feet in the air and on a incline has one end that's lower than the other, so the airplane has a low end. It's all a matter of reference.

    So the farther I hold the tablet away from my face the lower end the tablet is?(Joking)

  • Reply 142 of 152
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    splif wrote: »
    So the farther I hold the tablet away from my face the lower end the tablet is?(Joking)

    Doesn't matter how far you hold it. If you're holding it straight up and down then the bottom is the low end and the top is the high end. ;)

    I recently saw a video in which children were able to out think adults because they didn't have preconceived notions. Both groups were shown cause and effect events, and then asked to predict the next outcome. The adults relied heavily on what the thought should happen next whereas the children went solely on the data from the previous events. The children were able to predict the outcome with more success than the adults. So think like a kid. :lol:
  • Reply 143 of 152
    ericblrericblr Posts: 172member
    I still prefer my roku over anything. I had an apple TV, but its interface was messy, crowded, and lacks third party app development.
  • Reply 144 of 152
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    gatorguy wrote: »
    I've always referred to the "low-end of a product line" as an entry-level model. I think most readers here would properly understand that more than calling it a low-end model.

    Now what if it's the only product line in existence?
  • Reply 145 of 152
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    dasanman69 wrote: »
    Now what if it's the only product line in existence?

    As [@]Gatorguy[/@] states, entry-level is the preferred term to refer to the cheapest model offered by a particular vendor as it signifies it's the cheapest model within a vendor's product category. The iPad was never the only player, it was and is the only player that worth caring about which is why people seem to forget that not only did tablets exist for 2 decades before Apple ever announced the iPad but a week earlier at CES and after months of rumours that Apple will release a tablet there are dozens upon dozens of tablets being demoed in some way, shape, or form. Even Steve Balmer got up on stage with the ill-fated HP Slate which weirdly shows a picture of an apple on it.


    [VIDEO]


    PS: Note that everyone was fine with referring to tablets as a 'PC' up until the iPad was released.
  • Reply 146 of 152
    aaronjaaronj Posts: 1,595member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post



    I can understand the initial confusion with dasanman's use of the term low end, but he's since clarified what he meant. He's even done so multiple times. How are people still confused? :/

     

    "That tomato needs to be refilled.  And by tomato, I obviously mean coffee cup."

     

    And in his initial statement, in that context, it still didn't make any sense anyways.

  • Reply 147 of 152
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    aaronj wrote: »
    "That tomato needs to be refilled.  And by tomato, I obviously mean coffee cup."

    Start filling. :lol:

    400
  • Reply 148 of 152
    ddpacinoddpacino Posts: 17member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by MachineShedFred View Post

     

    I'm surprised that nobody has commented yet that Google's action here is a page from Microsoft's strategy book:

     

    This is clearly a me-too attempt to spread FUD.  At least, that's what it appears to be until Google shows themselves even slightly competent at making a TV-attached content delivery device that people actually want.


     

     

    That's part of the misunderstanding. Google never made a Google TV box.... just the OS. The did make the Chromecast and didn't license that out to OEMs.

  • Reply 149 of 152
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    ddpacino wrote: »

    That's part of the misunderstanding. Google never made a Google TV box.... just the OS. The did make the Chromecast and didn't license that out to OEMs.

    The Nexus Q doesn't count as an HDTV connected device by Google?
  • Reply 150 of 152
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    The Nexus Q doesn't count as an HDTV connected device by Google?

    It never shipped. The ones that exist were the ones given out.
  • Reply 151 of 152
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    dasanman69 wrote: »
    It never shipped. The ones that exist were the ones given out.

    It's still by Google. They did build it and shipped it to people, even if they didn't offer it for retail sale. Same with Google Glass. It was available for sale, just not for retail sales. That makes those distinctly different than, say, something called Google R which was only built in the lab and tested internally.

    Here's an Apple-centric example. Apple, under the care of Jony Ive, built a one-of-a-kind red Mac Pro for a charity event. That item was not available for retail but the red Mac Pro was by Apple.
  • Reply 152 of 152
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    It's still by Google. They did build it and shipped it to people, even if they didn't offer it for retail sale. Same with Google Glass. It was available for sale, just not for retail sales. That makes those distinctly different than, say, something called Google R which was only built in the lab and tested internally.

    Here's an Apple-centric example. Apple, under the care of Jony Ive, built a one-of-a-kind red Mac Pro for a charity event. That item was not available for retail but the red Mac Pro was by Apple.

    To answer your initial question the Nexus Q was indeed a HDTV connected device. Their initial plan was to be integrated in TVs first, and then they built the Nexus Q. Both were ill fated attempts. Poorly thought out, and poorly executed.
Sign In or Register to comment.