Apple's Ive hints new materials to be used in upcoming products, suggests new form factors and devic

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  • Reply 21 of 81
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    frac wrote: »
    Uh uh... The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) officially standardised on aluminium in 1990.
    The pretension is all American....but only officially since 1925 btw, first in disagreeing with the naming by the great Sir Humphrey Davy and then having a list of metals comprising....well do you really say also chronum, rhodum, cadmum all before we get to say caesium... I give up, I can't defeat spellchecker anymore...:p

    1) My comment went way, way over your cranum.

    2) If you want to discuss the most abundant metal in the Earth's crust then the term aluminum predates aluminium. It was the British that decided after the fact and without consideration to any standards body to make the word use the -ium suffix to more closely match other metals on the periodic table.

    3) Your argument that every American is pretentious for not converting their language in the last 24 years because of what the IUPAC wants is ridiculous.
  • Reply 22 of 81
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    Originally Posted by Frac View Post

    The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) officially standardised on aluminium in 1990.

     

    Who gives a frick what they say?

     

    ... British chemist and inventor Humphry Davy... ...settled on aluminum by the time he published his 1812 book Chemical Philosophy... But the same year, an anonymous contributor to the Quarterly Review, a British political-literary journal, in a review of Davy's book, objected to aluminum and proposed the name aluminum, "for so we shall take the liberty of writing the word, in preference to aluminum, which has a less classical sound."


     

    The pretension is all YOURS, sir. Get over it.

     

    ...first in disagreeing with the naming by the great Sir Humphrey Davy...


     

    Except the exact opposite is true. As for the rest of your post, try looking at the periodic table sometime. 

  • Reply 23 of 81
    berndogberndog Posts: 85member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    It's so pretentious how the British add an 'i' to the word titanum¡
    That's al-u-mini-um!
  • Reply 24 of 81
    mistercowmistercow Posts: 157member

    What's it matter. People will just put a plastic case around it.

  • Reply 25 of 81
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    teejay2012 wrote: »
    <div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/180731/apples-ive-hints-new-materials-to-be-used-in-upcoming-products-suggests-new-form-factors-and-devices#post_2551118" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false"><span>Quote:</span><div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Macky the Macky</strong> <a href="/t/180731/apples-ive-hints-new-materials-to-be-used-in-upcoming-products-suggests-new-form-factors-and-devices#post_2551118"><img src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" class="inlineimg" alt="View Post"/></a><br/><br/>It's totally a guess that Apple will be using Liquid Metal. After Jony made his announcement, Samsung announced they will be soon be making their cases out of unobtainium. You heard it here first folks!</div></div><p> </p>

    Haha. Close. Samsung will have cases that are unobtainium <i>colored</i> plastic
    Apparently this is Samsung's new "premium" metal Galaxy phone:

    44637
  • Reply 26 of 81
    jakebjakeb Posts: 557member
    Everyone wants a phone with stretch marks.
  • Reply 27 of 81
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

    Apparently this is Samsung's new "premium" metal Galaxy phone:

     

    Makes sense. They've never so much as seen champagne, so they couldn't get the color right. :p

  • Reply 28 of 81
    groakesgroakes Posts: 53member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post



    It's so pretentious how the British add an 'i' to the word titanum¡

    Not sure that Apple should be building products from Corpse plants. I think titanium is a much better option....

  • Reply 29 of 81
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,354member
    rogifan wrote: »
    Apparently this is Samsung's new "premium" metal Galaxy phone:

    44637

    Are you sure that shouldn't be 'premum' metal ... ;)
  • Reply 30 of 81
    mpantonempantone Posts: 1,420member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TheWhiteFalcon View Post

     

    I've been feeling like they needed to go somewhere besides aluminum for a while. It's not bad, just a bit old at this point.


    Aluminum is one of the most recyclable metals. Recycling aluminum from scrap uses 5% of the energy necessary to make new metal from bauxite ore.

     

    It is hugely important in terms of Apple's environmental responsibility in using this planet's finite resources.

  • Reply 31 of 81
    solipsismx wrote: »
    1) My comment went way, way over your cranum.

    2) If you want to discuss the most abundant metal in the Earth's crust then the term aluminum predates aluminium. It was the British that decided after the fact and without consideration to any standards body to make the word use the -ium suffix to more closely match other metals on the periodic table.

    3) Your argument that every American is pretentious for not converting their language in the last 24 years because of what the IUPAC wants is ridiculous.

    In the "thumbs-up" comment, I originally typed "Cranum" but the autocorrect tripped me up. Sigh.
  • Reply 32 of 81
    groakesgroakes Posts: 53member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post





    1) My comment went way, way over your cranum.



    2) If you want to discuss the most abundant metal in the Earth's crust then the term aluminum predates aluminium. It was the British that decided after the fact and without consideration to any standards body to make the word use the -ium suffix to more closely match other metals on the periodic table.



    3) Your argument that every American is pretentious for not converting their language in the last 24 years because of what the IUPAC wants is ridiculous.



    Not that I really care but....

     

    http://www.worldwidewords.org/articles/aluminium.htm

    "...

    The metal was named by the English chemist Sir Humphry Davy ..., even though he was unable to isolate it: that took another two decades’ work by others. He derived the name from the mineral called alumina, which itself had only been named in English by the chemist Joseph Black in 1790. Black took it from the French, who had based it on alum, a white mineral that had been used since ancient times for dyeing and tanning, among other things. Chemically, this is potassium aluminium sulphate...

    Sir Humphry made a bit of a mess of naming this new element, at first spelling it alumium (this was in 1807) then changing it to aluminum, and finally settling on aluminium in 1812. His classically educated scientific colleagues preferred aluminium right from the start, because it had more of a classical ring, and chimed harmoniously with many other elements whose names ended in –ium, like potassium, sodium, and magnesium, all of which had been named by Davy.

    The spelling in –um continued in occasional use in Britain for a while, though that in –ium soon predominated. In the USA, the position was more complicated. Noah Webster’s Dictionary of 1828 has only aluminum, though the standard spelling among US chemists throughout most of the nineteenth century was aluminium; it was the preferred version in The Century Dictionary of 1889 and is the only spelling given in the Webster Unabridged Dictionary of 1913. Searches in an archive of American newspapers show a most interesting shift. Up to the 1890s, both spellings appear in rough parity, though with the –ium version slightly the more common, but after about 1895 that reverses quite substantially, with the decade starting in 1900 having the –um spelling about twice as common as the alternative; in the following decade the –ium spelling crashes to a few hundred compared to half a million examples of –um.

    ..."

  • Reply 33 of 81
    curtis hannahcurtis hannah Posts: 1,763member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    3. Allow yourself to not make promises you can't keep due to unexpected circumstances.

    A couple notable examples are Resolution Independence announced at the 10.4(?) event and FaceTime going open source during the iOS 4(?) event.
    Yay that's included. I can see it if apple annoced a major product that came 12 months later, with no ther consequences except Samsung copying the idea in time to release there's 11.5 months later annocing that apple was far behind them/
  • Reply 34 of 81
    asciiascii Posts: 5,941member

    English is famous for stealing words from other languages. Here is a nice quote from James Nicoll:

    "The problem with defending the purity of the English language is that English is about as pure as a cribhouse whore. We don't just borrow words; on occasion, English has pursued other languages down alleyways to beat them unconscious and rifle their pockets for new vocabulary."

     

    What the US is to nations (taking the best of all cultures without prejudice) English is to languages.

     

    I personally prefer the Aluminium spelling, not because I grew up with British-English, but because it sounds more Latin, and there is a tradition in English of using Latin names for scientific or medical things (such as classifications of plants and animals). 

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foreign_language_influences_in_English

  • Reply 35 of 81
    hexclockhexclock Posts: 580member
    Ameri
    frac wrote: »
    Uh uh... The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) officially standardised on aluminium in 1990.
    The pretension is all American....but only officially since 1925 btw, first in disagreeing with the naming by the great Sir Humphrey Davy and then having a list of metals comprising....well do you really say also chronum, rhodum, cadmum all before we get to say caesium... I give up, I can't defeat spellchecker anymore...:p
    Ameridumb
  • Reply 36 of 81
    The amusing thing about the British Preference for "AL-you-[B]MIN[/B]-ium" is that it violates the rules of their own dialect (or Received Pronunciation™, anyway) against secondary stress. They have to say "MIL-i-try" and "SEC-re-try", but then they pick out a few words to violate their own rules with, apparently just to be different from the American pronunciation.

    You can sometimes hear a momentary pause before each word as they shift mental gears before saying "AL-you-[B]MIN[/B]-ium" or "OH-re-[B]GAH[/B]-no" or "[B]JAG[/B]-YOU-ar".
  • Reply 37 of 81
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member

    Thread theme song.

    image

  • Reply 38 of 81
    gwmacgwmac Posts: 1,797member

    Liquidmetal

  • Reply 39 of 81
    tundraboytundraboy Posts: 1,620member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Mac-sochist View Post



    The amusing thing about the British Preference for "AL-you-MIN-ium" is that it violates the rules of their own dialect (or Received Pronunciation™, anyway) against secondary stress. They have to say "MIL-i-try" and "SEC-re-try", but then they pick out a few words to violate their own rules with, apparently just to be different from the American pronunciation.



    You can sometimes hear a momentary pause before each word as they shift mental gears before saying "AL-you-MIN-ium" or "OH-re-GAH-no" or "JAG-YOU-ar".

     

    I wouldn't call it a 'rule', it's more like a custom or habit.

  • Reply 40 of 81
    joelsaltjoelsalt Posts: 827member
    tundraboy wrote: »
    I wouldn't call it a 'rule', it's more like a custom or habit.

    It's neither. Old English tended to pronounce words based on the first syllable, which tended to create alliterative strophic poetry.

    After William the conqueror changed the official court language to French in 1066, French words entered the lexicon, which is why Chaucer is so different from, say, Gawain and the Green knight.

    French words (and Latin, which we borrowed from heavily in the Renaissance) have stresses in later syllables. So borrowed words (calques) have different stresses than old English words, which are also typically shorter.
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