Apple's Ive hints new materials to be used in upcoming products, suggests new form factors and devic

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  • Reply 41 of 81
    retiariusretiarius Posts: 142member

    Nice thread, with the Barenaked Ladies tune a good catch.

     

    Now, language lawyers (or rather barristers), please explain molybdenum:

     

          http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/pronunciation/british/molybdenum#

  • Reply 42 of 81
    robvosrobvos Posts: 1member
    iWatch --> Omega already does liquid metal - and uses sapphire glass
    http://www.omegawatches.com/planet-omega/watchmaking/liquidmetal
    Is where Apple are looking?
  • Reply 43 of 81
    fracfrac Posts: 480member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    frac wrote: »
    Uh uh... The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) officially standardised on aluminium in 1990.
    The pretension is all American....but only officially since 1925 btw, first in disagreeing with the naming by the great Sir Humphrey Davy and then having a list of metals comprising....well do you really say also chronum, rhodum, cadmum all before we get to say caesium... I give up, I can't defeat spellchecker anymore...:p

    1) My comment went way, way over your cranum.

    2) If you want to discuss the most abundant metal in the Earth's crust then the term aluminum predates aluminium. It was the British that decided after the fact and without consideration to any standards body to make the word use the -ium suffix to more closely match other metals on the periodic table.

    3) Your argument that every American is pretentious for not converting their language in the last 24 years because of what the IUPAC wants is ridiculous.

    Whoa there...making it personal?
    In which case the opprobrium is all yours.

    But yeah, you're right, it's very pretentious of the Brits to define and celebrate their own language. How dare they!
  • Reply 44 of 81
    solipsismx wrote: »
    It's so pretentious how the British add an 'i' to the word titanum¡

    So the American version is ttanium? ????
  • Reply 45 of 81
    It's totally a guess that Apple will be using Liquid Metal. After Jony made his announcement, Samsung announced they will be soon be making their cases out of unobtainium. You heard it here first folks!

    It would tie in quite nicely to use Liquid Metal iPhones with the recently announced Metal!
  • Reply 46 of 81
    <span style="line-height:1.4em;">It's so pretentious how the British add an 'i' to the word titanum¡</span>

    Remember that the Briton that discovered/named aluminum named it thus, and it was only a newspaper that decided they could name it whatever they wanted that the second I got thrown in there. Disgusting.
    A couple notable examples are Resolution Independence announced at the 10.4(?) event and FaceTime going open source during the iOS 4(?) event.

    Yep, both right.

    The Briton didn't name it thus, he named it aluminum.
  • Reply 47 of 81
    I've been feeling like they needed to go somewhere besides aluminum for a while. It's not bad, just a bit old at this point.

    Yes; glass is getting a bit old, too. Maybe they could use plastic.
  • Reply 48 of 81
    frac wrote: »
    solipsismx wrote: »
    It's so pretentious how the British add an 'i' to the word titanum¡

    Uh uh... The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) officially standardised on aluminium in 1990.
    The pretension is all American....but only officially since 1925 btw, first in disagreeing with the naming by the great Sir Humphrey Davy and then having a list of metals comprising....well do you really say also chronum, rhodum, cadmum all before we get to say caesium... I give up, I can't defeat spellchecker anymore...:p

    Also, aluminium has a better rhythm to it than aluminum. Poetry Beats Prose.
  • Reply 49 of 81
    rogifan wrote: »
     
    I've been feeling like they needed to go somewhere besides aluminum for a while. It's not bad, just a bit old at this point.
    And yet when HTC came out with the unibody aluminum One everyone drooled over it. What material would you prefer Apple use over aluminum? 

    Aluminium or Liquid Metal.
  • Reply 50 of 81
    rogifan wrote: »
    teejay2012 wrote: »
    <div class="quote-container" data-huddler-embed="/t/180731/apples-ive-hints-new-materials-to-be-used-in-upcoming-products-suggests-new-form-factors-and-devices#post_2551118" data-huddler-embed-placeholder="false"><span>Quote:</span><div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>Macky the Macky</strong> <a href="/t/180731/apples-ive-hints-new-materials-to-be-used-in-upcoming-products-suggests-new-form-factors-and-devices#post_2551118"><img src="/img/forum/go_quote.gif" class="inlineimg" alt="View Post"/></a><br/><br/>It's totally a guess that Apple will be using Liquid Metal. After Jony made his announcement, Samsung announced they will be soon be making their cases out of unobtainium. You heard it here first folks!</div></div><p> </p>

    Haha. Close. Samsung will have cases that are unobtainium <i>colored</i> plastic
    Apparently this is Samsung's new "premium" metal Galaxy phone:

    44637

    You mean their new 'premum' phone. ????
  • Reply 51 of 81
    groakes wrote: »
    solipsismx wrote: »
    1) My comment went way, way over your cranum.


    2) If you want to discuss the most abundant metal in the Earth's crust then the term aluminum predates aluminium. It was the British that decided after the fact and without consideration to any standards body to make the word use the -ium suffix to more closely match other metals on the periodic table.


    3) Your argument that every American is pretentious for not converting their language in the last 24 years because of what the IUPAC wants is ridiculous.


    Not that I really care but....

    http://www.worldwidewords.org/articles/aluminium.htm
    "...
    The metal was named by the English chemist Sir Humphry Davy ..., even though he was unable to isolate it: that took another two decades’ work by others. He derived the name from the mineral called alumina, which itself had only been named in English by the chemist Joseph Black in 1790. Black took it from the French, who had based it on alum, a white mineral that had been used since ancient times for dyeing and tanning, among other things. Chemically, this is potassium aluminium sulphate...
    Sir Humphry made a bit of a mess of naming this new element, at first spelling it alumium (this was in 1807) then changing it to aluminum, and finally settling on aluminium in 1812. His classically educated scientific colleagues preferred aluminium right from the start, because it had more of a classical ring, and chimed harmoniously with many other elements whose names ended in –ium, like potassium, sodium, and magnesium, all of which had been named by Davy.
    The spelling in –um continued in occasional use in Britain for a while, though that in –ium soon predominated. In the USA, the position was more complicated. Noah Webster’s Dictionary of 1828 has only aluminum, though the standard spelling among US chemists throughout most of the nineteenth century was aluminium; it was the preferred version in The Century Dictionary of 1889 and is the only spelling given in the Webster Unabridged Dictionary of 1913. Searches in an archive of American newspapers show a most interesting shift. Up to the 1890s, both spellings appear in rough parity, though with the –ium version slightly the more common, but after about 1895 that reverses quite substantially, with the decade starting in 1900 having the –um spelling about twice as common as the alternative; in the following decade the –ium spelling crashes to a few hundred compared to half a million examples of –um.
    ..."

    Which is right: aluminum or aluminium?
  • Reply 52 of 81
    The amusing thing about the British Preference for "AL-you-MIN-ium" is that it violates the rules of their own dialect (or Received Pronunciation™, anyway) against secondary stress. They have to say "MIL-i-try" and "SEC-re-try", but then they pick out a few words to violate their own rules with, apparently just to be different from the American pronunciation.

    You can sometimes hear a momentary pause before each word as they shift mental gears before saying "AL-you-MIN-ium" or "OH-re-GAH-no" or "JAG-YOU-ar".

    Maybe as a compromise, we should rename it:

    iLuminum.

    That way, we preserve the two 'i's (for the Brits), keep the American pronunciation (for the Yanks) and pay homage to Apple.
  • Reply 53 of 81
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,359member
    The amusing thing about the British Preference for "AL-you-MIN-ium" is that it violates the rules of their own dialect (or Received Pronunciation™, anyway) against secondary stress. They have to say "MIL-i-try" and "SEC-re-try", but then they pick out a few words to violate their own rules with, apparently just to be different from the American pronunciation.

    You can sometimes hear a momentary pause before each word as they shift mental gears before saying "AL-you-MIN-ium" or "OH-re-GAH-no" or "JAG-YOU-ar".

    I will probably start a sh!t storm against me here but ... The thing about 'British' pronunciation, (as you allude to with your parenthetical reference to RP), is drive 20 miles and it changes (historical invasions from various countries and the settlers' languages residually remaining in the working class, as they tended to be the least mobile through time, being the root cause). For anyone to infer there is any such thing as a common way to speak English in the UK is absurd. I grew grew there till I was in my 30's. I can no longer understand many dialects these days. Watching the World Cup Football on ESPN is an example, some of the commentators could be speaking double Dutch for all I can tell, I wish they would use American commentators (... if only they knew how to commentate on a game without using the time to have chats with each other and about anything but the game in hand). The American dialects are many but I have never failed to understand any, be it broad Massatchusettes or a deep New Orleans drawl. I have no idea why this is. After 25 years in the USA my 'ear' has changed, Liverpudlian, Newcastle Geordie, Manchurian .... could be foreign languages to me these days, and I grew up in the midlands not London.
  • Reply 54 of 81
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 19,302member
    The amusing thing about the British Preference for "AL-you-MIN-ium" is that it violates the rules of their own dialect (or Received Pronunciation™, anyway) against secondary stress. They have to say "MIL-i-try" and "SEC-re-try", but then they pick out a few words to violate their own rules with, apparently just to be different from the American pronunciation.

    You can sometimes hear a momentary pause before each word as they shift mental gears before saying "AL-you-MIN-ium" or "OH-re-GAH-no" or "JAG-YOU-ar".

    Do the British pronounce it as 'al-you-min-ium', or 'alu-min-ium'?:smokey:
  • Reply 55 of 81
    pazuzupazuzu Posts: 1,728member
    rogifan wrote: »
    And yet when HTC came out with the unibody aluminum One everyone drooled over it. What material would you prefer Apple use over aluminum? 

    I thought it was the screen?
  • Reply 56 of 81
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,359member
    Maybe as a compromise, we should rename it:

    iLuminum.

    That way, we preserve the two 'i's (for the Brits), keep the American pronunciation (for the Yanks) and give homage to Apple.

    Very illuminating idea ... :D
  • Reply 57 of 81
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,359member

    Do the British pronounce it as 'al-you-min-ium', or 'alu-min-ium'?:smokey:

    The former ... as many syllables as possible ... :D
  • Reply 58 of 81
    crowleycrowley Posts: 5,997member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by digitalclips View Post





    The former ... as many syllables as possible ... image

    No, no, no, you've got us all wrong; it's as many letters as possible in the spelling, and as many different and argumentative pronunciations as possible in the saying :err:

     

    See the many usages of -ough for much bewilderment.

  • Reply 59 of 81
    Very illuminating idea ... :D
    Or ill-u-min-i-ating :)

    Oh English. The most stolen Germanic language around!
  • Reply 60 of 81
    Maybe as a compromise, we should rename it:

    iLuminum.

    That way, we preserve the two 'i's (for the Brits), keep the American pronunciation (for the Yanks) and give homage to Apple.

    Very illuminating idea ... :D

    Nice one! You must have ruminated on that...
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