Apple's Ive hints new materials to be used in upcoming products, suggests new form factors and devic

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  • Reply 61 of 81
    The amusing thing about the British Preference for "AL-you-MIN-ium" is that it violates the rules of their own dialect (or Received Pronunciation™, anyway) against secondary stress. They have to say "MIL-i-try" and "SEC-re-try", but then they pick out a few words to violate their own rules with, apparently just to be different from the American pronunciation.

    You can sometimes hear a momentary pause before each word as they shift mental gears before saying "AL-you-MIN-ium" or "OH-re-GAH-no" or "JAG-YOU-ar".

    Do the British pronounce it as 'al-you-min-ium', or 'alu-min-ium'?:smokey:

    I've always heard "you", I think. That's one good thing about (the most common) British accents (that we hear over here, anyway)—they haven't lost the palatal onglide in front of "u". This is one of the things that's spread from Noo Yawk all over the country since I was a kid: "nooz", "toon"... drives me nuts. That and the loss of the aspirated "w" ("Would you like some cheese with that whine?" is now a pun) and the "aw" sound in "dog". ("My dotter got a new dahg".) Well, those two features are New England rather than New York.
  • Reply 62 of 81
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 19,305member

    Do the British pronounce it as 'al-you-min-ium', or 'alu-min-ium'?:smokey:

    The former ... as many syllables as possible ... :D

    Growing up in India, where we spoke a version of Br English, we always pronounced it as 'alu-minium'. ????
  • Reply 63 of 81
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by boredumb View Post

     

    lol -

    well, it's just that they're so poetic -

    they had to make it rhyme with 'aluminium' after all.


    Pfft. Here in the States we us alumaximum!

  • Reply 64 of 81
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,359member
    crowley wrote: »
    No, no, no, you've got us all wrong; it's as many letters as possible in the spelling, and as many different and argumentative pronunciations as possible in the saying :err:

    See the many usages of -ough for much bewilderment.

    Also remember the 'simpler' spelling of many words in the USA is a recent thing (relatively speaking lol) thanks to the work of that Scotsman Carnegie and his push for this (probably as a way of getting at the English [inside British joke]) through his Simplified Spelling Board and was partially accepted in the 1920's: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simplified_Spelling_Board

    I am continually amazed at the number of well educated Americans who are unaware of this and join in debates about 'silly English spelling v sensible American spelling', totally unaware how this came about. Had Carnegie's full list of suggestions been adopted American would be a laughing .. sorry, laffing stock :no:. Thankfully only a few words were changed .. e.g. colour to color and so on. Just read some of his crazy ideas list at the link above.
  • Reply 65 of 81
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    Which is right: aluminum or aluminium?

    Both are right. This is language so there can be multiple right answers. The problem starts when people make claims about what is right for their dialect should also be right for other dialects. The problem then often escalates when one makes claims of what is the "pure and right" spelling of a word because of an etymology, which they oddly tend to get backwards.

    Language has no inherent right or wrong; it's too fluid for that. Communication to an intended audience is the only concern.
  • Reply 66 of 81
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,359member
    Growing up in India, where we spoke a version of Br English, we always pronounced it as 'alu-minium'. ????

    Right, me too (the pronunciation not growing up in India :D) , but surely that is still five syllables.
  • Reply 67 of 81
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,359member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    Both are right. This is language so there can be multiple right answers. The problem starts when people make claims about what is right for other dialects because of what is right for their dialect. The problem then often escalates when one makes claims of what is the "pure and right" spelling of a word because of an etymology, which they oddly tend to get backwards.

    Totolee rite, well sed. :D
  • Reply 68 of 81
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 4,643member

    All I have to say is Ives took some liberties in this statement

     

    Quote:

    Ive said Apple is well versed in employing new materials to solve design problems and pointed to the days when the company's laptops were made of plastic. Recalling the development of the titanium PowerBook G4, which launched in 2001, he said the exotic metal was used to realize a new thin-and-light form factor computer that could not be accomplished with composites.


     

    Apple use a titanium stiffener in the PowerBook Duo back in the early 90's and they did this before any other company. It was use to make the plastics thinner and to deal with the heat issue that Plastic do not conduct heat away form electronics all that well. He makes it sound like he was the first to think this up. It was thought of long before the titanium Powerbook, the reason it was not done earlier was due to costs. 

  • Reply 69 of 81
    flaneurflaneur Posts: 4,511member
    rogifan wrote: »
    Is this the same NY Times that AI claimed Apple shut out in their profile piece on Tim Cook?

    Your pretend bluster is off-key, no surprise.

    The context for DED's headline was that the Times was shut out from access to Tim Cook. That is true.

    Now we see in part two with Jony Ive that the intrepid reporters were used—as in exploited— by Apple to make a serious point about the Cook-Ive regime's product focus.

    They were apparently shunted to Ive, who portrays Cook as having the commitment and patience to explore new materials and processes that set Apple's devices so far apart from other manufacturers. The reporters were manipulated by Apple, not that it mattered in the end so much, given the treachery of their kind of "journalism."

    If DED had known this second part was coming, he might not have leaned so hard on that "shut out" formula.
  • Reply 70 of 81
    flaneurflaneur Posts: 4,511member
    maestro64 wrote: »
    All I have to say is Ives took some liberties in this statement


    Apple use a titanium stiffener in the PowerBook Duo back in the early 90's and they did this before any other company. It was use to make the plastics thinner and to deal with the heat issue that Plastic do not conduct heat away form electronics all that well. He makes it sound like he was the first to think this up. It was thought of long before the titanium Powerbook, the reason it was not done earlier was due to costs. 

    You're taking what the reporters said for what Ive said. He would not likely misrepresent, since he is a machinist. Being inaccurate gets you nowhere in that trade, except into trouble. In journalism, it can get you a Pulitzer.
  • Reply 71 of 81
    mactacmactac Posts: 315member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tundraboy View Post

     

     

    I wouldn't call it a 'rule', it's more like a custom or habit.




    "What about the pirate's code?"

    "They're more like guidelines actually."

  • Reply 72 of 81
    retiariusretiarius Posts: 142member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DimMok View Post

     

    Please Sharks with Lasers….


     

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by retiarius View Post

     

    Nice thread, with the Barenaked Ladies tune a good catch.

     

    Now, language lawyers (or rather barristers), please explain molybdenum:

     

          http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/pronunciation/british/molybdenum#


    Updating this with more killjoy definitive expertise (for Al atomic number 13), with four pronunciations,

    two in the Queen's English and two with American accent.

     

            http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/pronunciation/british/aluminium#

  • Reply 73 of 81
    aaronjaaronj Posts: 1,595member

    These discussions about pronunciation reminds me of a (completely OT) memory of listening -- or, trying to -- a conversation between Ian Rankin and Grant Morrison once.  Jeez.  Two guys from Glasgow ... I must have listened to that discussion like 20 times.

     

    Now, back to our regular programming. :)

  • Reply 74 of 81
    The amusing thing about the British Preference for "AL-you-MIN-ium" is that it violates the rules of their own dialect (or Received Pronunciation™, anyway) against secondary stress. They have to say "MIL-i-try" and "SEC-re-try", but then they pick out a few words to violate their own rules with, apparently just to be different from the American pronunciation.

    You can sometimes hear a momentary pause before each word as they shift mental gears before saying "AL-you-MIN-ium" or "OH-re-GAH-no" or "JAG-YOU-ar".

    I didn't think we had any rules against secondary stress. We make it up as we go along. :smokey:
  • Reply 75 of 81
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 4,643member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Flaneur View Post





    You're taking what the reporters said for what Ive said. He would not likely misrepresent, since he is a machinist. Being inaccurate gets you nowhere in that trade, except into trouble. In journalism, it can get you a Pulitzer.

    wait reports do not put words in people mouths... To that point may not be an exact quote, but the intent is probably close.

     

    We all know Apple act as if they had the idea first, and we all agree apple usually does a far better job than anyone else even when it was not their idea.

  • Reply 76 of 81
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 19,305member
    Pfft. Here in the States we us alumaximum!

    Sounds like alumaximium misspelled...... ;)
  • Reply 77 of 81
    Pfft. Here in the States we us alumaximum!

    Sounds like alumaximium misspelled...... ;)

    Or alumaxum...
  • Reply 78 of 81
    flaneurflaneur Posts: 4,511member
    maestro64 wrote: »
    wait reports do not put words in people mouths... To that point may not be an exact quote, but the intent is probably close.

    We all know Apple act as if they had the idea first, and we all agree apple usually does a far better job than anyone else even when it was not their idea.

    Ok you want to take the article as it stands, he does NOT say or imply that they were the first to think of using titanium in this way, but he does say and imply that they were pushing design and manufacturing in order to make this material practical in a consumer product. Which is correct, as you yourself say. Don't make stuff up to criticize him with.
  • Reply 79 of 81
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    aaronj wrote: »
    These discussions about pronunciation reminds me of a (completely OT) memory of listening -- or, trying to -- a conversation between Ian Rankin and Grant Morrison once.  Jeez.  Two guys from Glasgow ... I must have listened to that discussion like 20 times.

    Now, back to our regular programming. :)

    I think it's time for this classic skit…


    [VIDEO]
  • Reply 80 of 81
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,985member
    Or ill-u-min-i-ating :)

    Oh English. The most stolen Germanic language around!

    Bunch of Kraut copycats :lol:
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