Apple activates iPhone 5 battery replacement program, to swap out affected parts for free

Posted:
in iPhone edited June 2015
Apple on Friday announced a free replacement program for iPhone 5 batteries after discovering certain units sold during a five-month period after the product's launch in 2012 contain faulty components.

iPhone 5


As noted by the program's dedicated webpage, Apple discovered a "very small percentage" of iPhone 5 handsets may suffer from unexpectedly short battery life due to an unannounced issue presumably related to manufacturing.

According to Apple, iPhone 5 units affected by the problem come from a batch sold between the product's launch in September 2012 through January 2013.

Owners who purchased their handset within that time period and are experiencing shortened battery life symptoms can check if their unit is eligible for replacement via Apple's website. A serial number is needed to process the request.

As with past replacement programs, users with affected iPhones will be required to take their handset in to an Apple Authorized Service Provider, Apple Store or send it off to Apple for examination prior to service in order to verify eligibility.

Aside from determining whether an iPhone contains one of the known-faulty batteries, the phone must be in working order to be eligible for a part swap. Any damage that would make replacement of the battery difficult, like a cracked screen, would first need to be fixed, meaning the swap-out could come at a cost.

For now, the initiative is limited to users in the U.S. and China, though coverage will be expanded to other countries on Aug. 29. Apple is extending the program to users with affected iPhone 5 batteries for two years after first retail sale or until Mar. 1, 2015, whichever provides longer coverage.

The program's start comes just weeks before Apple is expected to reveal a next-generation iPhone lineup on Sept. 9.
«1345

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 89
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,260member
    Wow, mine qualifies! Last year Apple replaced my 2010 MBP i7 15" motherboard this year this. Way to go Apple.
  • Reply 2 of 89
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    There you go TS, I said there was a battery life issue and you said there wasn't.

    No surprise, the 5 I bought for my daughter is one of those affected. No surprise, the replacement process is limited to the US. No surprise, I have already replaced the battery myself.
  • Reply 3 of 89
    buckalecbuckalec Posts: 192member

    Mine is qualified too - I hope the third party manufacturer is eating the cost. 

  • Reply 4 of 89
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    cnocbui wrote: »
    There you go TS, I said there was a battery life issue and you said there wasn't.

    No surprise, the 5 I bought for my daughter is one of those affected. No surprise, the replacement process is limited to the US. No surprise, I have already replaced the battery myself.

    Um...
    As of August 22, 2014, the replacement process will be available in the U.S. and China. In other countries, it will be available as of August 29, 2014.
  • Reply 5 of 89
    droidftwdroidftw Posts: 1,009member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cnocbui View Post



    There you go TS, I said there was a battery life issue and you said there wasn't.



    No surprise, the 5 I bought for my daughter is one of those affected. No surprise, the replacement process is limited to the US. No surprise, I have already replaced the battery myself.

     

    If it makes you feel any better, those in the US who have the same problem will likely fall into 1 of 2 categories.

     

    1)  Already replaced the battery themselves.

    2) Signed up for a new 2 yr. contract last year or will be doing so this year and will therefore not need a replacement battery.

     

    This will matter most to those iPhone owners who can't afford to upgrade their phone (AKA, teenagers).

  • Reply 6 of 89
    cnocbui wrote: »
    No surprise, the 5 I bought for my daughter is one of those affected. No surprise, the replacement process is limited to the US. No surprise, I have already replaced the battery myself.

    Apple usually limits these quality program's to the US only to begin with and then other countries usually follow in due course.

    If you have paid Apple for a replacement battery and your phone is eligible for the program, Apple will usually refund the repair cost (based on my experience with previous quality program's.)
  • Reply 7 of 89
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 2,461member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cnocbui View Post



    There you go TS, I said there was a battery life issue and you said there wasn't.

    TS was certainly referring to a different battery life issue that doesn't exist. ;-)

  • Reply 8 of 89
    I knew there was something wrong with my phone when it went from 50% charged at night to 0% come morning.

    I'm going to have it replaced because I haven't yet decided if I'm going to sell it, trade it, or keep it upon the I phone 6 launch.
  • Reply 9 of 89

    This is one of the reasons I still look at AppleInsider daily, to get important news. My iPhone 5 has been having battery problems for months, and coincidentally today it finally died completely! Just checked and it qualifies for the free battery. Thank you AI for the news and helping hopefully getting my phone fixed tonight.

  • Reply 10 of 89
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post

     

     

    If it makes you feel any better, those in the US who have the same problem will likely fall into 1 of 2 categories.

     

    1)  Already replaced the battery themselves.

    2) Signed up for a new 2 yr. contract last year or will be doing so this year and will therefore not need a replacement battery.

     

    This will matter most to those iPhone owners who can't afford to upgrade their phone (AKA, teenagers).


     

     

    Hmm... I'm over 40 and have a good job, and this helps me. Still have my original battery, still on my original 2012 two-year contract, my phone died completely today - can't charge, and already made my Genius bar appointment for tonight to hopefully get a new battery. Oh well, so much for that theory.

  • Reply 11 of 89
    droidftwdroidftw Posts: 1,009member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mesomorphicman View Post


    Hmm... I'm over 40 and have a good job, and this helps me. Still have my original battery, still on my original 2012 two-year contract, my phone died completely today - can't charge, and already made my Genius bar appointment for tonight to hopefully get a new battery. Oh well, so much for that theory.

     

    Good to hear you'll get treated right after getting some bum hardware!  I've never had to deal with such issues, but I'd sure be frustrated if I did.

  • Reply 12 of 89
    cnocbui wrote: »
    There you go TS, I said there was a battery life issue and you said there wasn't.

    No surprise, the 5 I bought for my daughter is one of those affected. No surprise, the replacement process is limited to the US. No surprise, I have already replaced the battery myself.

    No, the replacement programme isn't limited to the US. It starts in US and China, and will then be extended to other countries.

    Hope you enjoy your surprise.
  • Reply 13 of 89
    buckalec wrote: »
    Mine is qualified too - I hope the third party manufacturer is eating the cost. 

    It is. When I had mine replaced several months ago, the Apple Store staff told me that Apple wouldn't be absorbing any of the costs, nor for the power button issue that I had.

    There was clearly a quality control failure with a batch of iPhone 5 models. It's right that the third party manufacturers should be liable for the cost. Let's hope that the next iPhone doesn't suffer similar issues.
  • Reply 14 of 89
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post

     
    This will matter most to those iPhone owners who can't afford to upgrade their phone (AKA, teenagers).


    I wouldn't make that assumption. My iPhone 5 is scheduled to become my unlocked international travel phone as soon as the new model is released. I need it to last at least another two years. Mine might be covered but so far I have had no battery issues.

  • Reply 15 of 89
    swiftswift Posts: 436member

    Well, I had to replace the battery within a year and a half on my iPhone 5, and I bought the thing in October after the launch. But the serial number wasn't in the precise range they accept, so no refund. 

  • Reply 16 of 89
    Bravo Apple!
  • Reply 17 of 89
    swift wrote: »
    Well, I had to replace the battery within a year and a half on my iPhone 5, and I bought the thing in October after the launch. But the serial number wasn't in the precise range they accept, so no refund. 

    That's a shame. If the problem had asserted itself six months earlier, they would have probably replaced it for free.
  • Reply 18 of 89
    mike1mike1 Posts: 1,886member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cnocbui View Post



    There you go TS, I said there was a battery life issue and you said there wasn't.



    No surprise, the 5 I bought for my daughter is one of those affected. No surprise, the replacement process is limited to the US. No surprise, I have already replaced the battery myself.

    From Apple Web site... "If you believe your iPhone 5 was affected by this issue, and you paid to replace your battery, you can contact Apple about a refund."

  • Reply 19 of 89
    mike1mike1 Posts: 1,886member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cnocbui View Post



    There you go TS, I said there was a battery life issue and you said there wasn't.



    No surprise, the 5 I bought for my daughter is one of those affected. No surprise, the replacement process is limited to the US. No surprise, I have already replaced the battery myself.

    From Apple Web site... "If you believe your iPhone 5 was affected by this issue, and you paid to replace your battery, you can contact Apple about a refund."

  • Reply 20 of 89
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,096member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DroidFTW View Post


    This will matter most to those iPhone owners who can't afford to upgrade their phone (AKA, teenagers).

     

    Really? Come on. Teenagers don’y buy iPhones. Their parents do. In fact I know a teenager who is now 32 years old and guess what? Her parents are STILL paying for her mobile service even though she moved away and in with her boyfriend. Really, what galaxy do you live in to say that teenagers can’t afford to replace their batteries? Mommy and Daddy do that. 

Sign In or Register to comment.