Document claims to detail 'Phosphorus,' a mysterious chip for Apple's 'iPhone 6' [u]

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited August 2014
Apple's so-called "iPhone 6" may include a new chip code-named "Phosphorus" for analyzing new data, such as barometric pressure of the surrounding environment of the company's motion coprocessor, a new schematic suggests [updated].




Update: While the original leak suggested the schematic above showed off a new "M8" motion coprocessor, a pair of knowledgeable commenters at MacRumors believe that the new mystery chip may actually be a barometric pressure sensor. The part is said to be similar to the Bosch BMP280.

Commenter "leecbaker" suggested that the addition of a barometric pressure sensor to the "iPhone 6" could allow for enhanced GPS and indoor/outdoor navigation functions. Other uses would include forecasting weather, better measurement of altitude, and potentially helping to measure users' breathing rates.

The original story published earlier Monday remains in its entirety:

Last year, Apple introduced the M7 coprocessor as part of the A7 system-on-a-chip inside the iPhone 5s, allowing battery-efficient motion tracking. This year's "A8" chip may also feature an improved "M8" motion sensor, according to the latest alleged "iPhone 6" schematic, published on Monday through Geek Bar's Weibo account and spotlighted by G for Games.

While the document doesn't offer any specifics on what upgrades the "M8" might accomplish, GeekBar speculates that the "Phosphorous" chip might help to collect and interpret new health-related data for the next-generation iPhone. Potential subjects suggested include heart rate, calories burned, cholesterol levels, blood sugar and more.

Of course, all of that data can be read into the new Health app included in Apple's next-generation iOS 8 mobile operating system, which will launch next month when Apple is widely expected to unveil its "iPhone 6."

If Apple does indeed have an "M8" in the works, it's likely to be a part of a next-generation "A8" system-on-chip that will power the next iPhone. Some reports have claimed Apple's new custom CPU will be a multi-core design clocked at up to 2 gigahertz.

Schiller M7


When the M7 was unveiled last year, observers speculated that Apple could be laying the groundwork for a new tool that could power the company's so-called "iWatch," which is expected to focus on collecting health and fitness data. As such, with an Apple wearable device expected to debut this fall, it's also possible that an "M8" could be a hint of things to come in the "iWatch."

In its current incarnation, the M7 silently tracks user activity in the background. Compatible apps that tap into this data can track a user's steps throughout the day, providing essentially the same functionality as popular pedometers like Fitbit.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 58
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,260member
    'Phosphorus eh? Better keep water well away from that then!
  • Reply 2 of 58
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    What are the types of things Apple's sensors and health app can do without requiring FDA approval? Is it just a matter of not diagnosing or recommending a specific course of action?
  • Reply 3 of 58
    strixstrix Posts: 22member
    Phosphorus is also the Greek name for the Morning Star or "light bearer"
  • Reply 4 of 58
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,671member
    ..."Phosphorous"...

    'Phosphorus eh?

    1000
  • Reply 5 of 58
    I wonder if there will be sold differing classes of iWatch-devices depending on what phone the owner has. If, for example you owned an iPhone 6 with the latest and most powerful tech, you might only need a smaller wrist device to track health with sensors, whereas if you have an iPhone 5 or earlier (or you don't have an iPhone) your iWatch would be larger with more (and more expensive) sensor tech in the band.

    This would allow for cheaper, equally powerful iWatches to be sold to people with the newest iPhones (and allow for Apple to sell affordable iPhone/iWatch sets) while offering similar advanced functionality to everyone else but at a higher standalone price.
  • Reply 6 of 58
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Carrier Wave View Post



    I wonder if there will be sold differing classes of iWatch-devices depending on what phone the owner has. If, for example you owned an iPhone 6 with the latest and most powerful tech, you might only need a smaller wrist device to track health with sensors, whereas if you have an iPhone 5 or earlier (or you don't have an iPhone) your iWatch would be larger with more (and more expensive) sensor tech in the band.



    This would allow for cheaper, equally powerful iWatches to be sold to people with the newest iPhones (and allow for Apple to sell affordable iPhone/iWatch sets) while offering similar advanced functionality to everyone else but at a higher standalone price.



    Nope

  • Reply 7 of 58
    strix wrote: »
    Phosphorus is also the Greek name for the Morning Star or "light bearer"

    Stars use to typically guide people hundread a of years ago. So this could be a pun be apple. E.g Apple will guide other companys, e.g they will copy them, e.g Samsung.
  • Reply 8 of 58
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    I wonder if there will be sold differing classes of iWatch-devices depending on what phone the owner has. If, for example you owned an iPhone 6 with the latest and most powerful tech, you might only need a smaller wrist device to track health with sensors, whereas if you have an iPhone 5 or earlier (or you don't have an iPhone) your iWatch would be larger with more (and more expensive) sensor tech in the band.

    This would allow for cheaper, equally powerful iWatches to be sold to people with the newest iPhones (and allow for Apple to sell affordable iPhone/iWatch sets) while offering similar advanced functionality to everyone else but at a higher standalone price.

    I could see that happening, but not based on the iPhone you've purchased, but in the wrist-worn device. For instance, the more stylish device will have less than the sporty version you are to wear every day.

    One marketing method Apple could use is to get people to buy multiple iWatches. You have your everyday sporty version which you also wear to sleep and then you have your stylish versions for when you dress up. With this method you get more sensors for exercising and sleep but something stylish that still tracks basic vitals at other times. Apple in return gets more iWatch sales per user.
  • Reply 9 of 58
    gtbuzzgtbuzz Posts: 129member
    BP, Heart Rate & O2 would be winners for a Health App. As to if this can be done easily & Accurately without the traditional BP Cuff, - I don't know.
  • Reply 10 of 58
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    I could see that happening, but not based on the iPhone you've purchased, but in the wrist-worn device. For instance, the more stylish device will have less than the sporty version you are to wear every day.

    One marketing method Apple could use is to get people to buy multiple iWatches. You have your everyday sporty version which you also wear to sleep and then you have your stylish versions for when you dress up. With this method you get more sensors for exercising and sleep but something stylish that still tracks basic vitals at other times. Apple in return gets more iWatch sales per user.
    I'll be very curious to see exactly what Apple does in this space. Right now smart watches seem to be a solution looking for a problem. It's tech companies looking for the next big thing and tech sites/geeks bored and looking for something new to get excited about. Very little concrete information has leaked about what Apple is working on so either it's one of their best kept secrets ever or it's a long way from a product ready for sale.
  • Reply 11 of 58
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,408member
    B-b-b-buuuuuuuuuurp! Ah, that's better.
  • Reply 12 of 58
    solipsismxsolipsismx Posts: 19,566member
    rogifan wrote: »
    Right now smart watches seem to be a solution looking for a problem.

    I don't see it that way at all. I see the M7 as being in the wrong place. Those sensors are best served by being on your person. I see wearables as a market segment I've wasted a long time for. The wrist is just the first step in intelligent wearables. Eventually I see subnormal implants and even a one-day-pill that monitors your vitals which will send to some wearable which then passes it on to your phone or directly to your private network for data collection. I then see this info being used in the home to give you warning of potential issues. The iWatch isn't looking for a problem, it's waiting for the technology to be at a point that the next phase of consumer electronics can begin.
  • Reply 13 of 58
    jakebjakeb Posts: 559member
    U wot m8?
  • Reply 14 of 58
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    solipsismx wrote: »
    I don't see it that way at all. I see the M7 as being in the wrong place. Those sensors are best served by being on your person. I see wearables as a market segment I've wasted a long time for. The wrist is just the first step in intelligent wearables. Eventually I see subnormal implants and even a one-day-pill that monitors your vitals which will send to some wearable which then passes it on to your phone or directly to your private network for data collection. I then see this info being used in the home to give you warning of potential issues. The iWatch isn't looking for a problem, it's waiting for the technology to be at a point that the next phase of consumer electronics can begin.
    That's why I said right now. Although I'm still skeptical about Apple being able to get into the health space without encountering a lot of red tape, regulations and FDA approvals. And that's just the United States. I'm curious how big their ambition is here. It seems like it could be a health and fitness play but then with some of the recent hires it seems like it could be a luxury fashion play. Perhaps Apple is going down multiple paths - luxury fashion and health/fitness? Still not sure how they blend the two.
  • Reply 15 of 58
    iqatedoiqatedo Posts: 1,705member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SolipsismX View Post





    I don't see it that way at all... I see wearables as a market segment I've wasted a long time for.

    I doubt that you waste two seconds on anything!

     

    I agree with you about wearables but there is a great development/application platform in the iPhone, that wonderful 'supercomputer' in your pocket.

  • Reply 16 of 58
    iqatedoiqatedo Posts: 1,705member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post





    Right now smart watches seem to be a solution looking for a problem...

    Believe me when I say that LASERs were regarded in the same vein 40 years ago. I was a member of the Laser Institute of America back then and there was always this promise in them but not yet the excitement. Mind you, I did hit the Moon with one, that was quite exciting!

  • Reply 17 of 58
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by IQatEdo View Post

     

    Believe me when I say that LASERs were regarded in the same vein 40 years ago. I was a member of the Laser Institute of America back then and there was always this promise in them but not yet the excitement. Mind you, I did hit the Moon with one, that was quite exciting!


    And now we attach LASERs to sharks. How times have changed!

  • Reply 18 of 58
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,260member
    philboogie wrote: »

    1000

    Well I was correct anyway :)
  • Reply 19 of 58
    solipsismx wrote: »
    I wonder if there will be sold differing classes of iWatch-devices depending on what phone the owner has. If, for example you owned an iPhone 6 with the latest and most powerful tech, you might only need a smaller wrist device to track health with sensors, whereas if you have an iPhone 5 or earlier (or you don't have an iPhone) your iWatch would be larger with more (and more expensive) sensor tech in the band.

    This would allow for cheaper, equally powerful iWatches to be sold to people with the newest iPhones (and allow for Apple to sell affordable iPhone/iWatch sets) while offering similar advanced functionality to everyone else but at a higher standalone price.

    I could see that happening, but not based on the iPhone you've purchased, but in the wrist-worn device. For instance, the more stylish device will have less than the sporty version you are to wear every day.

    One marketing method Apple could use is to get people to buy multiple iWatches. You have your everyday sporty version which you also wear to sleep and then you have your stylish versions for when you dress up. With this method you get more sensors for exercising and sleep but something stylish that still tracks basic vitals at other times. Apple in return gets more iWatch sales per user.

    I see as much likelihood of that happening as of Samsung bringing out one phone model per year.
  • Reply 20 of 58
    jakeb wrote: »
    U wot m8?

    Schultz loves you for writing sensible English. ????
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