Video demonstrates reported iPhone 6 Plus bending issues

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  • Reply 521 of 543
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by nikon133 View Post

     
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Damn_Its_Hot View Post





    You obvious have no engineering experience (or maybe common sense). I dare say if you take a wooden pencil and apply that forced it will not bend but break. Ever bend in a large building when there is an earthquake -- they sway to and fro and depending on the force applied usually don't incur much damage due to a 5-6 earthquake (assuming it was built to code). Not to be insensitive but the world saw what happens to the World Trade center when all the force came from once side (with a generous amount of heat), or the indonesian tsunami, etc...



    You build for a reasonable standard and then hope people don't abuse your design. IMHO putting a phone in your rear pocket with a glass front (and even the 4-5s with back glass is stupid. Would you play baseball or cricket for those across the pond with glass christmass tree ornaments?



    Come one and pull your head out -- it is to dark to see your phone up there anyway ¡




    Well duh. Of course anything will bend - eventually. But devil is in the details. Knowing that something that was (and still is) considered common and acceptable practice - as it is keeping phone in front pocket - can permanently damage phone in single go is a bit frightening.



    I don't see much value in your examples, sorry. Wooden pencil is, what? Less than $1? And buildings sway but return to original form after the quake - unless they are flattened. I'd expect plastic phones bend in pockets too, but flexibility of material allow them to bounce pack to their original form once the pressure is released, unless pressure was over the threshold of permanent damage . iPhone remains bent, even if pressure is not enough to actually kill the phone (break screen or damage pcb).



    Did anyone consider that these round edges might also be responsible to some degree? I'm pretty sure flat sides of iPhone 5/5s would be more resilient to this bending vector, even with iPhone 6+ size..?



    It has to do withe the bending moment and the moment of inertia rather than this 'bending vector'. I am sure they did a computational finite analysis on the structural integrity of the and also did bench techs in their materials lab. Hell, they have been doing CFD on there flow in the molds back when they were using plastic to do the most efficient flow and no cold seams.

     

    My point being they have a staff that is more than competent to design and test these but as to your claim that they are failing in a front pocket (I am assuming you mean pants) since it is ludicrous to believe that they bend over the odd boob (or two). But pant legs can have a lot of strain applied in strange patterns and possibly other items in a pocket are surely besides an iPhone would surely lean towards disaster.

     

    Pray tell what is the size limit Apple and its competitors should be building for - an iPad mini - larger you say? I think the point to go away with here is twofold: 1. Consumers: don't put an iPhone 6+ in your front pants; 2. Apple: with the current materials in use I think you have met or exceeded the goal for thinness. I know I don't want to pay what it would cost to move from Al to Ti (the metal is not so expensive but machining is a bitch - ask the boy at SkunkWorks). Maybe a liquid metal could somehow play a roll but it baffles me as to why they needed to do them thin anyway.

  • Reply 522 of 543
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by pazuzu View Post

     
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by stike vomit View Post

     

    I predict an upsurge in the popularity of cargo pants this fashion season.


     

     

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by island hermit View Post

     

     

    Apple has a few fashion people on board.

     

    "Introducing the new ApplePants collection!"


     




    I believe those pictured are parachute pants although cargo pants would certainly do the job. Its like being a walking backpack though.

  • Reply 523 of 543
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,365member
    icoco3 wrote: »
    Interesting though...the glass did not break and the iPhone still works (I assume).  What happens to a Samsung if bent like that?  Will glass be intact and will it still operate?  Interesting test to be done in a controlled environment.  Obviously as you note, the test was biased.
    A little more scientific test

    [VIDEO]
  • Reply 524 of 543
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by RadarTheKat View Post



    One wonders how a plastic Samsung large screen phone would fare with the same amount of pressure at the point where it's button cutouts reside. Plastic is also quite malleable.

    The same guy did the same test with the Note 3 as a follow up video: 

  • Reply 525 of 543
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post

     
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by icoco3 View Post



    Interesting though...the glass did not break and the iPhone still works (I assume).  What happens to a Samsung if bent like that?  Will glass be intact and will it still operate?  Interesting test to be done in a controlled environment.  Obviously as you note, the test was biased.

    A little more scientific test

     


     

    Interesting. Definitely a more controlled test, and all three phones survived impressively considering that they applied 100 lbs force - equivalent to a small person standing on the middle of the phone. The stated deflection measurements seemed to be incorrect (underestimates) especially for the Samsung, possibly due to the non-uniform deformation that it exhibited. And in the post-test shots, if there was any residual bend on the iPhone 6 then it was not discernible. Curious that they did not measure and report the residual bend.

  • Reply 526 of 543
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Damn_Its_Hot View Post

     

     

    Pray tell what is the size limit Apple and its competitors should be building for - an iPad mini - larger you say? I think the point to go away with here is twofold: 1. Consumers: don't put an iPhone 6+ in your front pants; 2. 


     

    If you're advising not to put a 6 Plus in your front pocket, then you are effectively saying to men: "Don't buy the iPhone 6 Plus."

     

    That's an almighty misstep by Apple to bypass half the population for its flagship iPhone.

  • Reply 527 of 543
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Gatorguy View Post





    A little more scientific test




     

    He seems to be getting the 6 and 6 plus confused in that video. That is obviously a 6 being tested (camera lens gives it away).

  • Reply 528 of 543
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Damn_Its_Hot View Post

     

    It has to do withe the bending moment and the moment of inertia rather than this 'bending vector'. I am sure they did a computational finite analysis on the structural integrity of the and also did bench techs in their materials lab. Hell, they have been doing CFD on there flow in the molds back when they were using plastic to do the most efficient flow and no cold seams.

     

    My point being they have a staff that is more than competent to design and test these but as to your claim that they are failing in a front pocket (I am assuming you mean pants) since it is ludicrous to believe that they bend over the odd boob (or two). But pant legs can have a lot of strain applied in strange patterns and possibly other items in a pocket are surely besides an iPhone would surely lean towards disaster.

     

    Pray tell what is the size limit Apple and its competitors should be building for - an iPad mini - larger you say? I think the point to go away with here is twofold: 1. Consumers: don't put an iPhone 6+ in your front pants; 2. Apple: with the current materials in use I think you have met or exceeded the goal for thinness. I know I don't want to pay what it would cost to move from Al to Ti (the metal is not so expensive but machining is a bitch - ask the boy at SkunkWorks). Maybe a liquid metal could somehow play a roll but it baffles me as to why they needed to do them thin anyway.


     

    I'm sure that they did exhaustive studies, both computational and experimental, on the strength of the device, and concluded that it was strong enough. And the video that Gatorguy linked to suggests that it is, since the applied force (100 lbs) seems unreasonably high to apply to an object in a pocket or, in any situation for that matter to a phone. In addition, while they say that there was residual deformation, it's not visible in the video, and is obviously less than the bending reported elsewhere from anecdotal evidence or uncontrolled testing. Pending significant further use data, I'm very suspicious that this is a fabricated issue to discredit the phone.

     

    By the way - you didn't mean moment of inertia.

  • Reply 529 of 543
    If you're advising not to put a 6 Plus in your front pocket, then you are effectively saying to men: "Don't buy the iPhone 6 Plus."

    That's an almighty misstep by Apple to bypass half the population for its flagship iPhone.

    Personally, I've worn cargo pants for years BECAUSE they are ideally suited to carrying and protecting an iPhone.
  • Reply 530 of 543
    relicrelic Posts: 4,735member
    Personally, I've worn cargo pants for years BECAUSE they are ideally suited to carrying and protecting an iPhone.


    Aaaahhhahhhahaha, I've heard of being a slave to fashion but never because of your smart phone.
  • Reply 531 of 543
    relic wrote: »
    Aaaahhhahhhahaha, I've heard of being a slave to fashion but never because of your smart phone.

    My next car must have Apple's iOS integration or no sale. How's that?
  • Reply 532 of 543



    Exactly. People want a giant phone, and then want a phone they can carry in their pocket. I have never wanted a giant phone, and truth be told, I have always thought that all iPhones were too big to carry in your pocket, which is why I use a belt clip case.

  • Reply 533 of 543
    relicrelic Posts: 4,735member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post





    My next car must have Apple's iOS integration or no sale. How's that?

     

    Oh that's okay, I just pictured your closet full of cargo pants and it made me laugh. On a side note it makes shopping for clothes a whole lot easier. You're probably amongst a select few who has a credit card from Duluth Trading.

  • Reply 534 of 543
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,034member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post





    My next car must have Apple's iOS integration or no sale. How's that?

    Hope you weren't planning on buying a new car this year then, or your choices are going to be very slim.

  • Reply 535 of 543
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Crowley View Post

     

    Hope you weren't planning on buying a new car this year then, or your choices are going to be very slim.


     

    I'm not. In the next year or two.

  • Reply 536 of 543
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Relic View Post

     

     

    Oh that's okay, I just pictured your closet full of cargo pants and it made me laugh. On a side note it makes shopping for clothes a whole lot easier. You're probably amongst a select few who has a credit card from Duluth Trading.


     

    <img class=" src="http://forums-files.appleinsider.com/images/smilies//lol.gif" />

  • Reply 537 of 543
    "Moderate" amount of force? The fellow is clearly straining. You know, I bet a bullet would also cause some harm. And who cares about competitor's phones? We certainly don't want to have any context, context is just a downer.
  • Reply 538 of 543
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cnocbui View Post

     

    Apple - always copying someone.  First it was Samsung, now it's LG:

     

    ;)




    Hmmm! I wonder how this phone could fit the pocket and not caused any damages.

  • Reply 539 of 543
    relicrelic Posts: 4,735member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by radster360 View Post

     



    Hmmm! I wonder how this phone could fit the pocket and not caused any damages.


    It's flexible.

  • Reply 540 of 543

    iPhone 6 Plus seems more prone to damage , at this price, that is really unacceptable... and some report suggesting that its total production cost of an iPhone is just $200, it means the company profits double the cost for single device, yet they didn't make sure build quality?  

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