Apple's OS X Yosemite 10.10.1 update improves Wi-Fi reliability, fixes Mail bugs, more

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 62
    shsfshsf Posts: 302member

    Same here, but I thought originally it was a problem with my remote desktop local installation. 

  • Reply 22 of 62
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,385member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by GrumpyCat View Post



    If this doesn't fix Mail.app (which has been getting suckier for many years) then I have a spare external HD necessary to overwrite Yosemite with Mavericks.



    Have no love lost on Mavericks for removing the option for automatic open-in-new-window for Finder. Think its nice that Yosemite Messages.app can receive SMS text from non-Apple sources. But I'm having the same issues with Mail as bugsnw but would add



    - Deletes draft messages created with another version of Mail.app.



    Long standing complaint about Mail.app is its twisted notion of "conversations". Apple is being a Microsoft Stupidhead in trying to reinvent mail threads which is a mature technology. I do not want all messages with similar subjects jumbled together, I want the In-Reply-To: and/or References: headers used to list messages in the order to which they were replied, not according to timestamp or other silliness. Clearly Mail.app's architect doesn't actually use email enough to know how these things are supposed to work.

     

    So you're gonna revert to an older, worse OS that is lacking so many new features, simply because of one app? If Mail isn't working well for you, there are a ton of alternatives (mailbox, etc) which are pretty great. Makes more sense that rolling back your whole OS. 

  • Reply 23 of 62
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 10,557member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Slurpy View Post

     

     

    So you're gonna revert to an older, worse OS that is lacking so many new features, simply because of one app? If Mail isn't working well for you, there are a ton of alternatives (mailbox, etc) which are pretty great. Makes more sense that rolling back your whole OS. 




    Just keep in mind that these types crawl out of their spider holes every time a new OS X update is released. Just take a gander at the comments already, people we never hear from until something is updated railing over their longstanding suffering with bugs that may or may not be real. Mail sucks, iTunes sucks, OS X whatever.whatever sucks. For people who claim to be advanced users who know what they are talking about, they sure seem to be clueless.

  • Reply 24 of 62
    I don't understand what the https://bugreport.apple.com is for. I sent a clear and well documented explanation on a annoying bug Yosemite introduced in Mail. It doesn't update intelligent folders as you delete items from it. Very annoying. Apple told me the bug was already filled and duplicated, (!?). Then the update, Mail 8.1, with same bug still there.
  • Reply 25 of 62
    eluardeluard Posts: 319member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Frank777 View Post

     

    Great. I usually wait for the .1 release before loading any new OS.

     

    Although I still haven't seen any straight answers on whether the Adobe CS5 versions work with Yosemite.




    I can say that Photoshop from CS5 works — InDesign fails for me.

  • Reply 26 of 62
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by thataveragejoe View Post

     

    The Mail app seems like it's never fully sorted from bugs over 3 or so major releases now? Maybe it's time for a rewrite from the ground up. 




    I know that when I worked at Apple in Networks a new System was considered "bug free" when the only thing left was cosmetic or feature requests with one small exception: If it existed before (in the previous release) and was not in someway now a "show stopper" it could be overlooked and RTM could take place. Most engineers did their damnedest to fix all outstanding bugs.

     

    There were actually a few bugs (very few) that occurred in such an obscure way that they were marked DO NOT FIX (e.g., there was a sorting error in the file system in HFS that when found and fixed in a late version of Sys 6.x would lock up the system in certain cases - it was not the implementation that was in error it was the sorting of diacriticals in some languages that caused the issue, whoever made up the sort table got two out of order but correcting it screwed up everything cause there was know versioning of the file system).

  • Reply 27 of 62
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,686member
    lkrupp wrote: »

    Just keep in mind that these types crawl out of their spider holes every time a new OS X update is released. Just take a gander at the comments already, people we never hear from until something is updated railing over their longstanding suffering with bugs that may or may not be real. Mail sucks, iTunes sucks, OS X whatever.whatever sucks. For people who claim to be advanced users who know what they are talking about, they sure seem to be clueless.

    Or they are having problems with buggy software.
  • Reply 28 of 62
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,686member

    I know that when I worked at Apple in Networks a new System was considered "bug free" when the only thing left was cosmetic or feature requests with one small exception: If it existed before (in the previous release) and was not in someway now a "show stopper" it could be overlooked and RTM could take place. Most engineers did their damnedest to fix all outstanding bugs.

    There were actually a few bugs (very few) that occurred in such an obscure way that they were marked DO NOT FIX (e.g., there was a sorting error in the file system in HFS that when found and fixed in a late version of Sys 6.x would lock up the system in certain cases - it was not the implementation that was in error it was the sorting of diacriticals in some languages that caused the issue, whoever made up the sort table got two out of order but correcting it screwed up everything cause there was know versioning of the file system).

    Since Apple is releasing both OS X and iOS .0 releases to marketing event driven schedules it can't use that system anymore. The OS used to not be coupled to hardware release. iOS 8 is. Increasingly OS X is.
  • Reply 29 of 62
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by asdasd View Post

     
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Damn_Its_Hot View Post





    I know that when I worked at Apple in Networks a new System was considered "bug free" when the only thing left was cosmetic or feature requests with one small exception: If it existed before (in the previous release) and was not in someway now a "show stopper" it could be overlooked and RTM could take place. Most engineers did their damnedest to fix all outstanding bugs.



    There were actually a few bugs (very few) that occurred in such an obscure way that they were marked DO NOT FIX (e.g., there was a sorting error in the file system in HFS that when found and fixed in a late version of Sys 6.x would lock up the system in certain cases - it was not the implementation that was in error it was the sorting of diacriticals in some languages that caused the issue, whoever made up the sort table got two out of order but correcting it screwed up everything cause there was know versioning of the file system).




    Since Apple is releasing both OS X and iOS .0 releases to marketing event driven schedules it can't use that system anymore. The OS used to not be coupled to hardware release. iOS 8 is. Increasingly OS X is.



    It may not have seen like it back then but the systems were very much tied to hardware i.e., almost any new hardware required a new System with an internal extension to patch the trap tables for things like wait states and such. Very seldom might have a new feature but your new Mac or Performa would not run without them.

  • Reply 30 of 62
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,686member

    It may not have seen like it back then but the systems were very much tied to hardware i.e., almost anyone hardware required a new System with an internal extension to patch the trap tables for things like wait states and such.

    Sure but that was a patch I.e system 7.5.1 which most people wouldn't have bothered with. iOS 8 is released for all devices and OTA on a date which is decided weeks or months before.
  • Reply 31 of 62
    dennis26 wrote: »

    Thanks for the Tip.... I tried that following the How To reset the SMC for an iMAC however the Bluetooth Connectivity issue still is with me...
    Interesting... What type / generation of Mac do you have?
  • Reply 32 of 62
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by asdasd View Post

     
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Damn_Its_Hot View Post





    It may not have seen like it back then but the systems were very much tied to hardware i.e., almost anyone hardware required a new System with an internal extension to patch the trap tables for things like wait states and such.




    Sure but that was a patch I.e system 7.5.1 which most people wouldn't have bothered with. iOS 8 is released for all devices and OTA on a date which is decided weeks or months before.



    I worked as part of a group that tested evey new system with all new and previously released hardware. As soon as a system was released for a new product it was fair game for the rest of the world. An awful lot of people did it cause they wanted to see what had changed - and there were the easter eggs that were added every couple of systems, even in the 6.x.x releases.

     

    BTW I like your signature line, but what the heck is OTA? (Not listed on http://www.acronymfinder.com)

  • Reply 33 of 62

    I know that when I worked at Apple in Networks a new System was considered "bug free" when the only thing left was cosmetic or feature requests with one small exception: If it existed before (in the previous release) and was not in someway now a "show stopper" it could be overlooked and RTM could take place. Most engineers did their damnedest to fix all outstanding bugs.

    There were actually a few bugs (very few) that occurred in such an obscure way that they were marked DO NOT FIX (e.g., there was a sorting error in the file system in HFS that when found and fixed in a late version of Sys 6.x would lock up the system in certain cases - it was not the implementation that was in error it was the sorting of diacriticals in some languages that caused the issue, whoever made up the sort table got two out of order but correcting it screwed up everything cause there was know versioning of the file system).

    Citing your years at Apple pre-NeXT 2.0 won't help this person. Discussing UNIX and HFS+ with Apple Core Engineering practices, etc., would help.
  • Reply 34 of 62
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 10,557member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by asdasd View Post





    Or they are having problems with buggy software.



    Yeah, ‘buggy’ software that the vast majority of users are NOT having issues with. Oh but it just couldn’t be their self-jiggered, terminal command enhanced, customized setups, edited .plist files, Little Snitch blocked service.

  • Reply 35 of 62
    Here is my Wifi speeds hooked up to a current-gem Airport Express on corporate LAN:

    [IMG ALT=""]http://forums.appleinsider.com/content/type/61/id/52480/width/350/height/700[/IMG]

    Don't hate :smokey:
  • Reply 36 of 62
    dewmedewme Posts: 5,492member
    Quote:


     Still not good enough. My iPad 3, which has the hardware to support the continuity features still doesn't have the option to turn that on.


     

    What you really should have said:

     

    Still not good enough. My iPad 3, which has the hardware that I believe should support the continuity features still doesn't have the option to turn that on even though Apple has never stated that this feature would run on the iPad3.

     

    Please provide a link to an Apple web site that says the iPad3 should support continuity/handoff. 

  • Reply 37 of 62
    it would not connect until i restarted my router. odd.
  • Reply 38 of 62
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bugsnw View Post

     

    I'll second that on the Mail app update. I think it's time for Apple to rewrite Mail from the ground up, focusing on reliability and speed.

     

    - you should only have to delete the trash once

    - trash should delete all emails when command executed

    - items clicked 'not junk' should not require constant reminders

    - sent emails should trigger the removal from 'drafts'

    - speed, speed, speed

     

    For quite a while, Mail has been a bit wonky. Not so on iOS devices. Seems like it needs more attention.




    Can you elaborate on which email provider(s) you are using and your connection to them? IMAP, POP3 or something else? I have 6 email accounts set up, all IMAP, one is iCloud and the remainder are Google Apps-based, and never experience these problems.

  • Reply 39 of 62

    Nice, this update finally fixed my Wifi which made it unusable where websites would just not load to completely fixed. It was definitely a Wifi issue as Thunderbolt ethernet worked completely fine.

  • Reply 40 of 62
    gtrgtr Posts: 3,231member

    Today, three hours after updating:

     

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