Traffic from Apple's unannounced iOS 9 grows into new year

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2015
Testing on Apple's anticipated iOS 9 release continues to ramp up at the start of 2015, with the next major iPhone and iPad operating system expected to make its official debut at the annual Worldwide Developers Conference in June.




Traffic data from AppleInsider shows that visits from devices that appear to be running early builds of iOS 9 have been steadily increasing over the last month. Traffic from iOS 9 devices peaked last week and has grown every week.

Very little has been rumored about iOS 9 thus far, though it's possible that Apple could leverage some of its recent acquisitions to boost its proprietary Maps service. In particular, Apple's purchases of HopStop and Embark are expected to pave the way for public transit data to be baked into the platform.

Apple is also believed to be interested in indoor navigation technology after its 2013 purchase of WifiSLAM. The unique indoor positioning tech uses Wi-Fi signals to extend location data to the insides of buildings and other structures.

Developers have also been hopeful that a future iOS release could open up Siri to third-party software, allowing App Store downloads to tap into the voice-driven personal assistant.

There has also been speculation that Apple could give developers access to the NFC chip found in the latest iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, allowing compatibility with services beyond Apple Pay. For example, NFC technology could allow iPhone users to make transit payments or gain secure access to a locked building through their mobile device.



Whatever Apple does have in the works for iOS 9, it's likely that the next-generation operating system will be unveiled at WWDC, the company's annual developer-focused event that typically takes place in June. If Apple sticks to its usual timeline, the company will also showcase OS X 10.11, the unnamed next-generation version of its Mac operating system, at the same show.

Reserved dates on the calendar for San Francisco's Moscone Center suggest that this year, WWDC could be held June 8 through 12. Last year, the dates were set aside for an unnamed "corporate event," but since then the listing has been removed.
«13

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 50
    pmzpmz Posts: 3,433member
    Cue the people that say its just lots of people with no lives spoofing their OS, and that iOS 9 doesn't really exist.
  • Reply 2 of 50

    I wish Apple would declare another "no new feature" release like Snow Leopard. Take a year to squash out all the bugs in the existing version of OS X and iOS 8. iOS 8.1.2 has been really buggy with iCloud syncing. Documents don't update in the background anymore. Random crashes in Safari, even crashing the whole iPad. Yosemite wifi is inconsistent, jerky animation (on my 2012 Mac Mini), etc. Come on Apple, I know you are better than this.

  • Reply 3 of 50
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by zoffdino View Post

     

    I wish Apple would declare another "no new feature" release like Snow Leopard. Take a year to squash out all the bugs in the existing version of OS X and iOS 8. iOS 8.1.2 has been really buggy with iCloud syncing. Documents don't update in the background anymore. Random crashes in Safari, even crashing the whole iPad. Yosemite wifi is inconsistent, jerky animation (on my 2012 Mac Mini), etc. Come on Apple, I know you are better than this.


    iOS 8 has been buggy. Consider this:

    Quote:


      iOS 7 was a small, but significant, visual makeover. That was it. iOS 8 was essentially jacking up your house to go from a small 200 square foot cellar to a 3500 square foot, three floor basement. If you don't think that's going to cause more than a few inconveniences, you're crazy. (let's remember that iOS 3's big new feature was cut/copy/paste)


    Given that there aren't a whole lot of things that need to be done to Nine, I suspect we'll be in better shape, especially since Apple is probably going to expand the beta testing program.

  • Reply 4 of 50
    Yeah, I'm hoping the same thing too. I notice a lot of bugs in terms of texting and photos - and how they are accessed or the camera is displayed. It's something that happens to several of us in the household. I would like to see a major "polishing" release like snow leopard as well.
  • Reply 5 of 50
    mike1mike1 Posts: 1,899member

    Either make it run much better on older devices OR just say the iPad2 can no longer accept new iOS updates. iOS8 on my iPad2 is just too slow. I wish they had just not offered it and I would have been just fine with iOS7 until I decided to upgrade to a newer iPad.

  • Reply 6 of 50
    adhiradhir Posts: 50member
    Cool video - some interesting concepts presented, despite the ghastly background music.
  • Reply 7 of 50
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,157member

    I wish, I hope. I wish for Unicorns with golden manes. I hope for cherry flavored vodka but I’ll take a Bud Light.

  • Reply 8 of 50
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 7,157member

    Nice video. Now let’s see this guy write the code for it. Not so easy is it. You can’t just snap your fingers and make it happen? It’s like being a performing musician criticized by somebody who claims they can do it better but falls apart into gelatinous goo when they walk out on stage in front of an audience. 

  • Reply 9 of 50
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    iOS 8 has been buggy. Consider this:
    Given that there aren't a whole lot of things that need to be done to Nine, I suspect we'll be in better shape, especially since Apple is probably going to expand the beta testing program.

    The next version of iOS shown off at WWDC should be iOS 8.5 or something. Calling it iOS 9 gives the impression it's a major release with lots of new features. iOS doesn't need a lot of new features right now. It needs bug fixing and polishing of the new stuff added over the last two years. One good thing about ?Watch is it will force Apple to fix issues with Bluetooth and WiF because ?Watch will be a terrible product if Bluetooth and WiFi aren't working properly.
  • Reply 10 of 50
    blastdoorblastdoor Posts: 1,929member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by zoffdino View Post

     

    I wish Apple would declare another "no new feature" release like Snow Leopard. Take a year to squash out all the bugs in the existing version of OS X and iOS 8. iOS 8.1.2 has been really buggy with iCloud syncing. Documents don't update in the background anymore. Random crashes in Safari, even crashing the whole iPad. Yosemite wifi is inconsistent, jerky animation (on my 2012 Mac Mini), etc. Come on Apple, I know you are better than this.




    I totally agree that they need to get the QA issues under control. 

     

    But I'm torn as to whether that absolutely has to necessitate another Snow Leopard. It could just mean that they need to improve their QA processes. I think I read somewhere that Apple is going to start to rely on its retail employees for help in software testing because relying on developers and a public beta was not entirely successful (because those "testers" aren't really testing -- they're just trying out new features). That makes sense to me. You get what you pay for. If you don't pay people to test your software, they're not really going to test your software. If Apple gives extra money to retail employees to help with testing, I bet they'll get better testers. (of course, if they don't actually pay the retail employees to help with testing, then they'll be stuck in the same boat they're already in). 

     

    I know that there's a meme out there that it's physically impossible to release a new OS every year and still maintain quality control. Maybe, but I doubt it. Apple ought to be able to manage the work so that they have multiple teams working on multiple versions of the OS simultaneously, and they ought to be able to have multiple high quality QA teams. This isn't 2007 -- Apple is now big enough that it should be able to walk, chew gum, text, and check train times all at the same time. I know that there are a lot of companies that are not able to do those things, but that doesn't mean it's impossible to do. I believe it can be done and that Apple is the company to do it. That's what hiring only A players, valuing collaboration, vertical integration, and having more money than god should be able to get you. 

     

    But yeah, if they can't make it work, then pull another Snow Leopard. Because these bugs have to stop. 

  • Reply 11 of 50

    I sure hope iOS 9 fixes this unusable, hot mess that my devices have become.  Safari is nearly unusable, rampant wifi issues and the so many really questionable UI treatments have really ruined iOS.

     

    As much as I disliked Scott Forstall, at least things worked when he was in charge of iOS devices.

  • Reply 12 of 50
    blazarblazar Posts: 270member
    The features are fine, just tune them, fix bugs, increase security more, and focus on icloud drive usability improvements...

    My wish list includes touchID... Wtf where is osx touch ID???
  • Reply 13 of 50
    schlackschlack Posts: 696member
    iOS 9.0 - Now with more stability, more efficiency, more battery life!

    Think there will be a big home automation, health kit ramp up.
  • Reply 14 of 50
    solipsismysolipsismy Posts: 5,099member
    zoffdino wrote: »
    I wish Apple would declare another "no new feature" release like Snow Leopard.

    Why do people keep saying it didn't have any features. It had plenty of features, it's just that most were back end advancements.
  • Reply 15 of 50
    Apple doesn't have enough software developers and expertise to continue iOS and Mac OS upgrades -- that is obvious.

    Pages and iBooks are crap software now -- not even comparable to the freeware given out with new Windows PCs. And, they're abandoning software development for movies, photos.

    Adding a new OS for the iWatch is not going to help.

    Perhaps they are taking on too much of the philosophy of Jonny Ive where simplicity and elegance trump functionality. That is, a function won't be implemented or feature won't be maintained, if it's not pretty and not simple.

    Artificial complexity in software should be eliminated but not at the expense of the substantive complexity.
  • Reply 16 of 50
    pmzpmz Posts: 3,433member

    I too am hoping iOS 9 focusing on polishing up the existing OS, and also giving developers more time and encouragement to update their Apps.

     

    There were a lot of groundbreaking enhancements added in iOS 8...that only a fraction of developers have even touched.

    Just a few being:

    1. Developers and can provide access to both 1Password and iCloud Keychain in their Apps....I have maybe 2 Apps that work with the 1Password extension and have yet to see a single App that will allow AutoFill of user/pass from iCloud Keychain.

    2. Still a wealth of Apps on my device have yet to even be updated for the iPhone 6/6 Plus display.

    3. Notification Center widgets are pretty lame.

    4. ApplePay is rare in 3rd party apps.

    5. HomeKit is just now seeing the first prototype products to integrate it, maybe on the market by summer. Just in time for iOS 9 and HomeKit 2.

    6. iCloud Drive was on an early rush of Apps, and most have not even touched it.

     

    None of this is to be blamed on Apple, it is 100% the stagnating developer community. Unless a new API can be clearly translated into "this is how our App makes more money"...there is little motivation for developers to spend the time and resources developing.

     

    Competition based on features doesn't exist, because discovery is still random.

     

    I've thought about what Apple could do to motivate developers to make their Apps better and more modern. 

    It makes me think of what happens in the accessory space when a new hardware design is released....no matter what you did before, what product you made or how successful it was...the score is reset to zero every time a new hardware design comes out, and you need to make new accessories for the new product...and the first company to do it right, reaps the biggest benefits. True competition.

     

    I wish something similar would happen with the App Store.

    When a new OS is released, and a new device comes on the market, if you want your App to appear on the store as available for that device, you are going to need to update it to meet a minimum set of requirements. I think this can be done. There was a time where Apple was really concerned about introducing a new device and making sure all Apps on the store were still compatible, however crappy the compatibility was (2x mode on iPad, Blurry Apps on Retina, Black bars on iPhone 5, Upscaling on iPhone 6). I think with the sheer volume of Apps today, and a desire for some App developers to compete vs. others resting on their laurels....some strict motivation should be put in place.

     

    Apple should require Apps be updated, and include certain user-benefiting features. Not everything, but certain critical things that raise the bar of the OS. Apple took a SMALL step in this direction when, in iOS 8, they dictated that for an App to include cloud services like Dropbox or OneDrive integration, they MUST also include iCloud. I thought this was fantastic, but the development community has shown that they will just as soon NOT update their Apps.

     

    Since Apple doesn't announce iPhone/iPad hardware specs until days before it becomes available, there has to be some grace period for developers to update their apps to properly support new display sizes/resolutions. But for me to still have Apps on my iPhone 6 Plus that are not optimized for the the display (Apps that have been updated with other changes in the last several months), is ridiculous. When Apple releases a new display size/resolution...any App that is not updated to support the new device within 3 months should be pulled from the store, or at least invisible to the new devices. Any App that is not recompiled with the latest SDK upon launch of the OS, should also be pulled from the store, or at least invisible to the new OS.

     

    I'm tired of seeing developers skate by without much commitment to their apps, but allowed to continue charging the same amount for their apps, and allowed to continue presenting them right alongside other apps that may actually have been updated and comply with current styles/features.

     

    TL;DR App store desperately needs forcible curation like the hardware accessory business has.

  • Reply 17 of 50
    irelandireland Posts: 17,617member

    A nice feature as part of the iOS 9 upgrade experience would be if Apple uploaded your local photos and videos (or checked if they already have been) and temporality deleted them from the device if there wasn't enough space for you to update and after the update downloaded them. That would encourage updating.

  • Reply 18 of 50
    Amen to all those calling for a slow-down on new releases and a speed-up on perfecting what we've got. Two examples: persistent blue dots indicating unread mail after its been read, and stubborn refusal of screen to rotate when device is rotated. I notice the latter on the Notes app on my iPhone 6 particularly. Whether that is hardware or software I don know, but it should have been addressed by now.
  • Reply 19 of 50
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by woodycurmudgeon View Post

     

    I sure hope iOS 9 fixes this unusable, hot mess that my devices have become.  Safari is nearly unusable, rampant wifi issues and the so many really questionable UI treatments have really ruined iOS.

     

    As much as I disliked Scott Forstall, at least things worked when he was in charge of iOS devices.




    I totally agree with this. It's aggravating, because a lot of the issues that have manifested themselves as real issues are hard to pin down and describe. Does anyone know the 53 steps they performed before an app crashed? Often times, the issue starts its downward slide at step 4 but only makes itself visible to the user at step 53, making troubleshooting anything but impossible. Apple and company are in the clear on this because anyone who comes in and says, "Safari crashes" is shown the door, told to reboot, and "Have a nice day!"

     

    Ninety-nine-point-three percent of the computer-using public has no idea what Console does, and wouldn't be able to analyze it and be able to tell a Genius that "the memory leaks seem to be emanating from a daemon that starts up when I visit www.website.com." 

  • Reply 20 of 50
    blazar wrote: »
    The features are fine, just tune them, fix bugs, increase security more, and focus on icloud drive usability improvements...

    My wish list includes touchID... Wtf where is osx touch ID???
    And why does Touch ID on my iPhone 6 continue to forget my fingerprints? It's been improved (by not forgetting as quickly as before) but it eventually forgets. Are my fingers changing?!
Sign In or Register to comment.