Tim Cook says Apple Watch will replace electronic car keys, confirms Apple Store revamp

15681011

Comments

  • Reply 141 of 201
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 4,028member
    mstone wrote: »
    Lugging? Geez, it weighs like 50 g. I'd rather not have to hide anything in my car or wear a watch. Personally, an ?Watch as a replacement for a key fob that isn't even really a complete replacement, is just a novelty, not an actual feature in my opinion.
    it's just a feature of the watch, not a replacement for sure just like it being a TV remote now
  • Reply 142 of 201
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 4,028member
    thompr wrote: »
    My Infiniti G35S from 2008 has the keyless entry using the keyfob.  So it's definitely not a new feature.  It was kind of a high-end feature back then, but not new in 2013.  My 2012 Sienna Van also had it.

    Thompson 
    My BMW bought in 2005 already had the keyless entry which in BMW term "Confort Access". It's nice but I really care less. It annoys me when i wash the damn car: the door keeps locking and unlocking when spraying water on it.
  • Reply 143 of 201
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 4,028member
    mstone wrote: »
    Insightful comments. I think I would prefer to stick with my BMW, Chevy and Toyota fob which are all effortless. If the ?Watch has some other compelling features, I might consider it, but this car lock idea is DOA in my opinion.
    One more thing that the fob has more advantage: car data (at least with BMW). BMW fob stores data in the key which is convenient during services.
  • Reply 144 of 201
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mstone View Post

     

    I have the same question. I would just hate it if Apple decided to enable a feature only on the ?Watch when the iPhone was clearly just as capable from a hardware perspective but in order to differentiate the two products only allowed the feature on the watch. That would be just BS. 




    That would be what Apple would do though.  It is what they did with iOS and Airplay.  If you had an iPhone or iPod Touch, you couldn't stream  to those devices using Airplay, you had to go and buy an ?TV or Airport Express when your existing HW was clearly capable of acting as a receiver as well.

  • Reply 145 of 201
    relicrelic Posts: 4,735member
    Absolutely, but not just Apple Watches, pretty much every mobile device will gain this ability. I mean look at Tesla, their app works with iOS, Android and most Android Wear watch. It's great to see Cook happy about an upcoming device but stating his device will basically rule then all, is a bit narcissistic, even if it is true.
  • Reply 146 of 201
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    charlituna wrote: »
    "Some have speculated that the current spate of rumors surrounding the development of an Apple Car actually point to an expansion of CarPlay"

    This is my vote. I don't think they want to make a car so much as understand how Apple products can better work with cars. Imagine CarPlay being able to give us the same deets that right now we need devices like Automatic for.

    Based on the CV's of the people rumored to be working on this car project it's highly unlikely they're working on a better CarPlay. Listen to the most recent ATP podcast. Marco, Casey and John all agree that Apple is looking into building an actual car. And Marco brought up a good point about how Apple's MO isn't to be a piece of tech in someone else's product. How many people know their car dash runs QNX? Apple would not want their solution nameless and pushed to the background and auto companies would not want Apple to be front and center in their car, especially if Apple was pitching this to many different car companies. They want differentiation; they don't want their dash looking just like a competitors dash. Look at ?Pay. Apple isn't using any proprietary technology. If a merchants POS system supports NFC it supports ?Pay. Yet many banks and merchants are specifically pushing/advertising ?Pay. I have a hard time believing Ford, GM, Toyota, etc. would push/advertise CarPlay.

    Personally I see CarPlay as a band-aid. And notice Apple doesn't talk about it much. That tells me it's not their ultimate solution. It's the Motorola ROKR.
  • Reply 147 of 201

    If your phone is your backup, then why do you need the watch in the first place?

    I rest my case.

    Really? Does that mean you won't be spamming every thread with the same tired arguments anymore?
  • Reply 148 of 201
    nolamacguy wrote: »

    If your phone is your backup, then why do you need the watch in the first place?

    I rest my case.

    Really? Does that mean you won't be spamming every thread with the same tired arguments anymore?

    I have never spammed any thread.

    There is a regular poster called SpamSandwich, but he generally writes very good thoughts.

    You must be confusing me with someone else; for that, I forgive you.
  • Reply 149 of 201
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,454member
    mstone wrote: »
    If the ?Watch has some other compelling features, I might consider it, but this car lock idea is DOA in my opinion.
    For you. And for me. I feel like this is one more attempt by Apple to generate hype and get people thinking about how they can use a wrist-worn device in their life to maximize its early adoption potential. But there are a sizeable group of people for whom this functionality will have great appeal.

    Personally, the fact the watch is tied to the phone, makes this functionality even less useful. As we understand it now the phone is required to authenticate the ?Watch for various secure services like ?Pay, and assumed that such verification remains valid only as long as the watch remains in contact with your wrist. Essentially it means for it to be useful, people will have to wear it at all times when it's not being charged. And it means that unlike an iPhone, the ?Watch will have to be authenticated with the iPhone after taking it off the charging station and placed back on your wrist. What if you're running late and forget to do this? Oops can't get into the car. What if you charge it at the office and Rush out for an appointment you're late to, forgetting your phone, as I and many of my colleagues have done many times. Now you're going to be even later. What if you take it off your wrist to show it to somebody at a party, and your phone has run out of juice? It's just one more complication in a world that is already super complicated.

    And this isn't the end of it, I'm sure the watch can be used to unlock your home, office, gym locker, hotel room; replace corporate IDs, membership IDs, drivers licenses and passports, and each extra thing it tries to do adds to he list of things that could go wrong due to the current limitations of the technology. It's one Thing for Tim Cook to talk about the devices potential, it's another to suggest a feature as a marketing bullet point.
  • Reply 150 of 201
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Relic View Post



    Absolutely, but not just Apple Watches, pretty much every mobile device will gain this ability. I mean look at Tesla, their app works with iOS, Android and most Android Wear watch. It's great to see Cook happy about an upcoming device but stating his device will basically rule then all, is a bit narcissistic, even if it is true.

     

    Since he never said rule them all I'm sure. You can put little rant in a box and ship it to non sequitur land.

  • Reply 151 of 201
    sog35 wrote: »
    Its for added security. If a theif has your keyfob they can drive off with your car.

    But if they get your watch they would also need your fingerprint or iphone password.

    So you need your ?Watch to be on and authenticated -and- your iPhone to be on and you to use Touch ID just to enter your car? That's inconvenient and sloppy as ****.
  • Reply 152 of 201
    mac_128 wrote: »
    As we understand it now the phone is required to authenticate the ?Watch for various secure services like ?Pay...

    Don't confuse "how you misunderstand it now" with "how we understand it now."
  • Reply 153 of 201
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,582member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post



     I have a hard time believing Ford, GM, Toyota, etc. would push/advertise CarPlay.

     

    I don't.   Apple's brand is very strong - stronger than that of Ford, GM, Toyota, Nissan, Honda, Subaru and most other car companies.  And most consumer surveys show that most consumers think their electronic dash controls suck.   So I think full integration of an enhanced Car Play would be beneficial to those companies.   Car companies already advertise such things as a "Bose sound system".   But one hurdle might be price as car companies incorporate unbelievable markups on OEM systems, frequently 700% or more.    That might not fit in with the way that Apple prices things.   

     

    As for Apple, if virtually every new car of the future incorporates CarPlay, that's a big win for Apple even aside from the OEM fees as it will encourage even more people to buy other Apple devices and keep them integrated into the Apple ecosystem.   I think that's important as phones reach a saturation point in developed countries and even though people will upgrade their phones every few years. 

  • Reply 154 of 201
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by zoetmb View Post

     
    I don't.   Apple's brand is very strong - stronger than that of Ford, GM, Toyota, Nissan, Honda, Subaru and most other car companies.  And most consumer surveys show that most consumers think their electronic dash controls suck.


    My BMW has the Harmon Kardon upgrade and it is fully branded on the speaker grilles, but I don't know how much of a marketing asset it is. It is more just another option like leather seats. People say the BMW screen UI is terrible but I think it is fine. Fact is, you are not supposed to be focused on the screen all the time anyway. You are supposed to be driving. The more simplistic it is the better. The other thing about CarPlay is that it has to download the map tiles over cell data and that is going to eat into your allocated data. Sure it is more up to date than the onboard map data, but I don't think most sales people are going to tell the customer that you will be paying an extra $20+ a month to your phone company if you use it.

  • Reply 155 of 201
    mstone wrote: »
    The other thing about CarPlay is that it has to download the map tiles over cell data and that is going to eat into your allocated data. Sure it is more up to date than the onboard map data, but I don't think most sales people are going to tell the customer that you will be paying an extra $20+ a month to your phone company if you use it.

    That's only if you're using non-local service like Apple Maps or Google Maps. If you use TomTom or other local mapping solutions there is no such issue, and you also get frequently updated maps data which you can do over WiFI. Also, if you re using Apple Maps you can plug in a location over WiFi and then that data will remain local for the duration of your trip. Finally, that data isn't excessive. I'm certainly more likely to have emails and iMessages use more cellular data whilst on the road than have Apple Maps giving me turn-by-turn for a trip.
  • Reply 156 of 201
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,316member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Benjamin Frost View Post



    I have never spammed any thread.



    There is a regular poster called SpamSandwich, but he generally writes very good thoughts.



    You must be confusing me with someone else; for that, I forgive you.

     

    All you do is spam. We could probably replace you with a spam bot that repeats the same 5 arguments over and over again, using slightly different words, and noone would notice. When you constantly post the same trollish, derisive comments, that make no intellectual sense, and that you make no effort to explain or backup with evidence, that's spamming. Like when you wanted to attack the iPad, but were so confused that you blamed it's sales on the (ultra-successful) iPhone marketing instead. Or when you never-endingly bash Tim Cook, never bothering to give him an ounce of credit even while he's surpassed every single sane expectation out there, always asking for his head.  Or your 1,000 posts during bend-gate, repeatedly calling the iPhone 6 a piece of trash because of a manufactured controversy. Or your 2,000 posts of mockery about the Beats deal, which again, was not based on any kind of logical criticism or merits of the deal itself, but because you believe Beats is associated with "ghettoization", or basically, black people, which irks you to no end. 

     

    Noone is asking for or cares for your forgiveness. But don't be naive enough to think that this entire board doesn't consider you a spammer at the least, among other more ugly things which I won't name. 

  • Reply 157 of 201
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismY View Post



    That's only if you're using non-local service like Apple Maps or Google Maps. If you use TomTom or other local mapping solutions there is no such issue, and you also get frequently updated maps data which you can do over WiFI. Also, if you re using Apple Maps you can plug in a location over WiFi and then that data will remain local for the duration of your trip. Finally, that data isn't excessive. I'm certainly more likely to have emails and iMessages use more cellular data whilst on the road than have Apple Maps giving me turn-by-turn for a trip.

    I haven't used it. I was basing my remarks on a post by @digitalclips who said he used up all his data on the first day of a trip using maps.

  • Reply 158 of 201
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    ...double

  • Reply 159 of 201
    sog35 wrote: »
    Nope. The watch knows who you are once you turn on yiur phone and put on your watch.

    1) Was my sarcasm too subtle?

    2) You're missing a step. You still need to authenticate the device once you place it on your wrist. It doesn't use the wrist-side sensors to verify your identity through biometrics. It only knows when to disable the secure features once it's removed from your wrist.
  • Reply 160 of 201
    thomprthompr Posts: 1,511member
    sog35 wrote: »
    You would give your fob to the attendent or auto shop. Most of us know when we are going to visit either. If not you can hide your fob in your car in a secret spot.
    Sog, you have absolutely no idea what you are talking about. Leave a fob in your car in a special place?

    Have you ever had one of these fobs? Your car beeps at you and refuses to lock your door when you leave a fob in it, thinking you must have inadvertently left it behind and may lock yourself out. You can try again, and it will obey, but it could get annoying if you had to do so each time. It doesn't count fobs (such as when you and my wife are traveling together and we both have fobs for my car) and then decide you are OK if only one is left when you lock it.

    Even worse, all that someone would need to do to steal your car is break a window and get in. Not that they should know this in advance, unless they are carrying some sort of fob detector, but it's a foolish idea nonetheless for several reasons.

    And none of that even begins to address what happens when one day you find yourself locked out of your car with no charge in your watch or phone. This will eventually happen.
Sign In or Register to comment.