Supplemental update for El Capitan beta fixes problems with 32-bit apps

Posted:
in macOS edited July 2015
Just one day after launching a public beta of the operating system, Apple has released a "Supplemental Update" for OS X El Capitan, fixing a bug that could cause some 32-bit apps to crash.




The update is available to both public beta testers and people with the third developer beta, which was seeded on Wednesday. Either version can be downloaded through the Mac App Store's Updates tab.

El Capitan users can also download a minor update to the OS' "Samantha" voice, improving clarity and pronunciation.

Because El Capitan is still in a pre-release phase, it's wise to make backups before trying the beta and avoid using it on mission-critical Macs.

The final version of the OS should launch for free sometime this fall. The software is mostly a refinement of Yosemite, but does include new features and refinements such as Split View, performance boosts, expanded search functions, pinned Safari tabs, and an easier incarnation of Mission Control.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 26
    cornchipcornchip Posts: 1,244member
    No way I'd ever install one of these unless I had a backup Mac.
  • Reply 2 of 26
    roakeroake Posts: 624member
    I remember way back in the day, I installed Windows 97 beta (the eventual shipping version was Windows 98).

    Life became hell.

    It took me two weeks to recover from that crap. Previously, I would install beta applications when available, but never again since getting burned by Win 97.

    I have faith that Apple would do a better job than Microsoft with a beta, but not enough to actually install it.

    RULE: No beta operating systems if you actually need the computer to work.

    I suppose one could set up an alternate boot partition to try it out. Even then, I would never use it to access live data.

    But that's just me.
  • Reply 3 of 26
    coolfactorcoolfactor Posts: 1,429member
    So get a backup Mac. :)
  • Reply 4 of 26
    coolfactorcoolfactor Posts: 1,429member

    So far, so good. El Capitan works like a hot diggety-dog.

  • Reply 5 of 26
    schlackschlack Posts: 686member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Roake View Post



    I remember way back in the day, I installed Windows 97 beta (the eventual shipping version was Windows 98).



    Life became hell.



    It took me two weeks to recover from that crap. Previously, I would install beta applications when available, but never again since getting burned by Win 97.



    I have faith that Apple would do a better job than Microsoft with a beta, but not enough to actually install it.



    RULE: No beta operating systems if you actually need the computer to work.



    I suppose one could set up an alternate boot partition to try it out. Even then, I would never use it to access live data.



    But that's just me.

     

    I remember way back in the day I installed Windows 98 and I got burned.

  • Reply 6 of 26
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,974member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cornchip View Post



    No way I'd ever install one of these unless I had a backup Mac.



    There are plenty of options which don't require having 2 Macs.  I personally have the developer beta installed on a high speed USB 3.0 flash drive and just boot back and forth.

  • Reply 7 of 26
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,142member
    cornchip wrote: »
    No way I'd ever install one of these unless I had a backup Mac.

    Well you can alternative boot drives.!
  • Reply 8 of 26
    konqerrorkonqerror Posts: 685member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cornchip View Post



    No way I'd ever install one of these unless I had a backup Mac.

     

    Run it in a VM like Fusion or Parallels. No reboots necessary.

  • Reply 9 of 26
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,719member
    cornchip wrote: »
    No way I'd ever install one of these unless I had a backup Mac.

    You wouldn't install it if the computer is used for work outside of development that is for certain and frankly Apple strongly suggests not installing it on production hardware. However beyond that El Capitan has been wonderful and is already a strong upgrade over Yosemite. I'm running it on a new MBP 13" and I have to say it will be well received when it goes stable and is released. iOS 9 on the other hand has a long long ways to go.
  • Reply 10 of 26
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,719member
    roake wrote: »
    I remember way back in the day, I installed Windows 97 beta (the eventual shipping version was Windows 98).

    Life became hell.
    Windows is what drove me to Linux after issues with 95 and then NT. The day that Apple described what would become the new mac OS I was overjoyed that it would be Unix at its roots. Having multiple Windows machines at work I can honestly say the platform really hasn't improved much over the years.

    It took me two weeks to recover from that crap. Previously, I would install beta applications when available, but never again since getting burned by Win 97.
    Beta applications are no problem, just uninstall them if they don't do it for you.
    I have faith that Apple would do a better job than Microsoft with a beta, but not enough to actually install it.

    RULE: No beta operating systems if you actually need the computer to work.
    Exactly and frankly this is what Apple advises.
    I suppose one could set up an alternate boot partition to try it out. Even then, I would never use it to access live data.

    But that's just me.

    If your computer is making money for you installing a beta OS or even upgrading to a new released OS, is foolish without considering all potential issues. However that doesn't mean that running a beta is a bad thing. The public testing is in fact very useful, even an old man like myself can find plenty of valid bug report to file. It is actually pleasing to have those bugs resolved too.
  • Reply 11 of 26
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,974member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by konqerror View Post

     

    Run it in a VM like Fusion or Parallels. No reboots necessary.


     

    The only concern here is to ensure the VM you're using fully supports it.  I know VMWare and Parallels work pretty quickly to support new OSes, but that doesn't mean Apple won't break compatibility with an update.  It is a beta OS after all.

  • Reply 12 of 26
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,784member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cornchip View Post



    No way I'd ever install one of these unless I had a backup Mac.



    Anyone who runs a beta on their working machine is flat out nuts but you see them in droves on the Apple Discussion Forums complaining about their ‘bricked’ machines and bashing the hell out of Apple.

  • Reply 13 of 26
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,495member
    Anyone dumb enough to install a beta OS (regardless of brand) on their PRIMARY machine gets everything they deserve. These are probably people that claim to be "developers" when they're really just weekend script kiddies.

    Assume any beta system will corrupt your machine. It's not rocket science. It's why it's called "beta"!
  • Reply 14 of 26
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,719member
    lkrupp wrote: »

    Anyone who runs a beta on their working machine is flat out nuts but you see them in droves on the Apple Discussion Forums complaining about their ‘bricked’ machines and bashing the hell out of Apple.

    It is amazing how few don't understand simple English!

    On the other hand widespread testing is good thing. I'm actually happy that Apple is engaged in broader beta releases, we just need to learn to ignore the people out there to stupid to understand what a beta is and the users responsibility with installing and testing it.
  • Reply 15 of 26
    mcarlingmcarling Posts: 1,106member

    I think we're approaching the time when it will make sense for Apple to stop supporting legacy 32-bit apps.  The transition from 32-bit apps to 64-bit apps began with 10.4 Tiger in 2005 and was reasonably complete with 10.7 Snow Leopard in 2009.

  • Reply 16 of 26
    asciiascii Posts: 5,941member

    Has anyone tried it? I heard graphics are faster.

  • Reply 17 of 26



    So far so good. In all honesty, my experience has been awesome! The graphics are snappier, and everything seems to flow smoother. Even going into Mission Control (which used to be laggy as hell) is stupid fast!

     

    And this is on a MBP 13" 2012 with 8GB of RAM. BTW, the new Beachball is also smoother. ????

  • Reply 18 of 26



    Don't forget Windows ME and Vista and 8.0...  Or is it just me?

  • Reply 19 of 26
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 918member
    schlack wrote: »
    I remember way back in the day I installed Windows 98 and I got burned.

    Win 98 SE forever! :-)

    mcarling wrote: »
    I think we're approaching the time when it will make sense for Apple to stop supporting legacy 32-bit apps.  The transition from 32-bit apps to 64-bit apps began with 10.4 Tiger in 2005 and was reasonably complete with 10.7 Snow Leopard in 2009.

    It may have started then but there are still a lot of major and supporting apps that are 32-bit, including some Apples own stuff. We aren't ready for this yet.
  • Reply 20 of 26
    mcarlingmcarling Posts: 1,106member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by razorpit View Post



    ... there are still a lot of major and supporting apps that are 32-bit, including some Apples own stuff. We aren't ready for this yet.

     

    I hope that 10.11 El Capitan will at least remove any remaining 32-bit Apple legacy code (if there is any other than the libraries required to run 32-bit apps).  Keeping around the 32-bit libraries to support 32-bit apps is a drag for Apple and keeping around hardware to support 32-bit instructions is a drag for Intel.  We may not be ready to drop 32-bit app support now, but we should be preparing to do so in the future.

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