Google launches OnHub Wi-Fi router, delays 'Ara' modular phone tests to 2016

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 64
    coolfactorcoolfactor Posts: 2,139member

    As much as I detest Google's data-ingesting efforts when it comes to online activity, I do applaud their efforts to make a better user experience on several obvious fronts. From Google Fiber and now this well-designed future-proofed OnHub device, among others, they continue to keep my interest. However, I am moving my email away from them. :)

  • Reply 42 of 64
    coolfactorcoolfactor Posts: 2,139member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by PJWilkin View Post

     

    From the spec sheet

    1x LAN port yet it has a Gigabit switch in it

    if the above is correct, then no DMZ and you'll need to add your own switch if you have multiple wired devices

     

    For $200 I'd expect a few more LAN ports




    Wow, really? Only 1 LAN port in this large device? OK, I withdraw my previous comment about applauding this device. I suppose that the LAN ports are used by only a small percentage of end-users in today's world, but really... how much would it cost to at least have 2 LAN ports?

  • Reply 43 of 64
    sirozhasirozha Posts: 801member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PJWilkin View Post

     

    From the spec sheet

    1x LAN port yet it has a Gigabit switch in it

    if the above is correct, then no DMZ and you'll need to add your own switch if you have multiple wired devices

     

    For $200 I'd expect a few more LAN ports




    The one LAN port on this device is to connect a NAS to. Everything else (at least in the future) will be able to push over 1 Gbps over Wi-Fi. Of course, if you have more wired devices, you can use a standalone switch. Or use your existing router's LAN ports if you don't want to buy a switch, connect your existing router's LAN port to this device's single LAN port and disable DHCP and Wi-Fi on your existing router. If you need a DMZ, you should get a real firewall. Consider a Checkpoint 600 Series.

     

    This router was probably engineered to support Google Fiber as very few consumer-grade routers can do NAT and SPI at the wire speed of 1 Gbps. 

     

    It remains to be seen if this device can outperform Apple's Airport Extreme or Time Capsule, though. I have my doubts about anything that Google touches. 

  • Reply 44 of 64
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 5,042member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by coolfactor View Post

     



    Wow, really? Only 1 LAN port in this large device? OK, I withdraw my previous comment about applauding this device. I suppose that the LAN ports are used by only a small percentage of end-users in today's world, but really... how much would it cost to at least have 2 LAN ports?


    In my house I have 26 LAN connections I have GB Cable modem, and connector to that I have a GB WAN/LAN wireless router and then have 26 point GB switch which all ports are connected to through my house. I am hardwire on everything except labtops, phones and ipads, those all use wireless. I do not like wireless for any of my streaming devices, hardware just works far better than wireless through walls and floors.

  • Reply 45 of 64
    Mmm ...

    According to some early pictures. the exterior of the Google OnHub Router is completely covered with marks -- circles about 2 inches in diameter ...


    It seems that people keep touching it with a 10-foot pole   :D
  • Reply 46 of 64
    sog35 wrote: »
    Exactly.  I'm pretty sure it wasn't in Google's TOS to drive around and steal people's Wifi logins and passwords.

    Still don't understand why Gatorbuy wastes his time here. He is obviously a huge Google Stan.

    He obviously feels that they need to be defended and, let's face it, with their reputation, they do.

    It is rather amusing to watch a single poster constantly promote and defend this one-hit wonder. However, if his constant pro-Google stance begins to irritate you, be aware that there are a large group of posters here who have taken to private threads in order to avoid him.

    Ask nicely and someone may give you details.
  • Reply 47 of 64
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,649member
    Come on Google it's the same with slightly more rounded corners!

    [IMG ALT=""]http://forums.appleinsider.com/content/type/61/id/61899/width/500/height/1000[/IMG]
  • Reply 48 of 64
    entropysentropys Posts: 4,031member
    We have that d-link modem-router. My first thought when looking at one hub is that it was the same, but with less LAN ports and no USB ports at all.

    Google is lucky it isn't Apple or it might get criticised for a lack of ports.

    Anyway, the key feature is the hub capacity for things like Nest. Apple has been too slow and Google is leapfrogging Apple here.
  • Reply 49 of 64
    shenshen Posts: 434member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by konqerror View Post

     

    I trust Google to design a secure and functional router far more than CyberTAN and all of those ODMs you never knew existed.




    Kinda the way they designed a secure phone OS.....

  • Reply 50 of 64
    shenshen Posts: 434member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

     

    Yeah I tell people all the time Agencies are never to be trusted, they are allow to violate your rights since they are not police nor do they have the authority to arrest you but they can share with the authorities what they learned about you no laws about that.

     

    But most US companies are on the up and up, most mean well but do cross the line from time to time, Google just does thing until they get caught and are told to stop doing it. The the old idea of do what you want and beg for forgiveness later.




    Which is exactly why you should never trust them with anything, ever. They are the poster child of companies that should be broken up...

  • Reply 51 of 64
    shenshen Posts: 434member
    Quote:



    How is this different than how they said they would not record info from Nest after the purchase just to later change the documentation to allow Google to capture data about your Nest devices? IOW, why can't they change their mind at any time? They've already been in trouble about capturing passwords from WiFI networks in the past.

     

    Exactly. This is the same company that mapped WiFi networks, grabbed passwords, used cookies after you opted out, used a browser flaw against users, and changes EULA to some of the dirties tricks any tech company ever pulled. If you are defending them you are either stupid, or brain washed.

  • Reply 52 of 64
    mdriftmeyermdriftmeyer Posts: 7,503member
    coolfactor wrote: »

    Wow, really? Only 1 LAN port in this large device? OK, I withdraw my previous comment about applauding this device. I suppose that the LAN ports are used by only a small percentage of end-users in today's world, but really... how much would it cost to at least have 2 LAN ports?

    I use every single one of my lan ports on my Airport Extreme Base station. Laser Printer Ethernet. ADSL Switch Ethernet, Workstation Ethernet and DISH Joey which links wireless connections back to the Hopper and rest of the Joey systems. I have a solo USB port still available.

    So glad I had to launch Chrome/Chromium as Firefox 40 doesn't show the specs sheet via Chrome javascript; href.

    1000
  • Reply 53 of 64
    "It also replaces a router's standard set of LEDs with a single ring light that shows one of four colors to indicate device status."

    What a wonderful triumph of design over accessibility. Wait, that's not how it's supposed to work--good design should facilitate accessibility. Silly Google.

    Now let me go find my PDF guide to decode the color codes...
  • Reply 54 of 64
    jd_in_sbjd_in_sb Posts: 1,600member
    It's deceiving to show the product with no wires when it requires, at a minimum, a power cord and a cable modem.
  • Reply 55 of 64

    So if possible, can we discuss the obvious rather than bash Google?  Google at least has released a wireless router with modern specs.  I have the following setup

     

    in a 1700 sq ft townhouse and still struggle with Apple Music, Netflix, etc streams that pause and buffer every few mins on a connection thats this fast:

     

    Clearly Apple knows that its current lineup of Wireless devices cant reliably manage the connections required for 4K streams.  So lets stop bashing Google and hold our favorite fruit company's feet to the fire.

  • Reply 56 of 64
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,374member

    Just what I was waiting for. I've been dreaming of having my email, desktop OS, mobile OS, browser, internet connection, and router all controlled by the same advertising agency, as well as everything else I do. What could do wrong?

  • Reply 57 of 64
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Maestro64 View Post

     

    Here is the scary part of this, the fact that Google had to answer the question in the first place is an issue. I am willing to bet that the device is somehow communicating back to Google. Google does not make stuff unless they can make money off datamining, it may not tell google which websites you are visiting bit it may be tell them other things about your usage.

     

    There is no reason to trust Google.




    The device has a unique ID that most likely will be transmitted to Google during a registration process. The registration process most likely will also collect the address, telephone number, email address, IP address of the computer used during the registration process and other information that Google will add to the profiles it already has on its customers.

     

    I have not doubt whatsoever, the  current agreement will be rewritten to authorize Google to have unfettered rights to collect and mine data from the device.

  • Reply 58 of 64
    crowley wrote: »
    No one is "reading" your email. No one personally cares enough about your email to read it. They'll machine scan it in order to be helpful, or to show you appropriate advertising because that's the deal - free, reliable, integrated, feature rich and spam filtered email with lots of capacity, in exchange for the advertising opportunity. If you don't like it don't use it, that's fine, but the idea that Google has ever been shady or duplicitous about it is balls.

    I don't know what's more sad, the loving devotion to a spam advertising scheme, or the wonder over a cheesy bastardized IMAP service.
  • Reply 59 of 64
    17381738 Posts: 3member
    konqerror wrote: »
    400
    This resembles the AirPort Extreme more than the Mac Pro. Also, I'm pretty sure Apple had the cylinder design in the late 90's...
  • Reply 60 of 64
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,453member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by redefiler View Post





    Crowley the sniveling Google apology mascot. I don't know what's more sad, the loving devotion to a spam advertising scheme, or the wonder over a cheesy bastardized IMAP service.



    I don't "love" Gmail at all, I don't even use it because, like you, I don't like advertising.  However, I recognise that my dislike for seeing advertisments is not shared by others, and that Google's business model is perfectly valid, and smart.  This "they read your email" complaint is supercilious and misleading.  

     

    Apple technology "reads" your email too, and in iOS9 it's going to do a whole lot more in terms of features.

     

    Apologies for snivelling.

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