Google unveils new Nexus phones, Chromecasts, Pixel C tablet & more

135678

Comments

  • Reply 41 of 158
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 3,972member
    kpluck wrote: »
    It is a $379 phone and the upgrade to 32GB is only $50...yeah, its the same thing. :rolleyes:  And even given that, yes, people are giving them crap for it. Do you always fail so completely?

    -kpluck
    so cheaper phone is allowed with 16GB starting? What's argument here about storage? 16GB is unacceptable for iPhone only not any phone?
    Btw, $50 from 16GB to 32GB is more expensive than $100 from 16GB to 64GB. Do the math.
  • Reply 42 of 158
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post





    It's not "odd" to lift a phone... it's odd to "have to" lift a phone just to wake the screen and check missed notifications when other phones have a button that is facing up ready to be pressed.



    Yeah you could keep the screen awake longer... but it will eventually go to sleep. And the cycle repeats!

    Are you really glad it's not on the front?



    Or do you simply go against any decision Apple makes? image



    It's the fronts versus the backs... FIGHT!

     

    Is the fingerprint sensor the only way to unlock an Android phone now, or does the traditional passcode still work? I think it's the latter so there is no "have to" with regards to the fingerprint sensor.

     

    But I wouldn't know because I'm Apple all the way, Not sure where you gleaned an assumption that I was anti-Apple? :\  That's what's odd here.

  • Reply 43 of 158
    Then don't buy an iPhone. I think it's a pretty dang perfect product and you are buying a whole lot more than some storage with that price. You're buying the fastest, mobile phone on earth. You are getting probably the best quality cameras. You're getting great apps that are developed on iOS first. You're getting great battery life. Even though the specs may be the same, Apple tends to make a whole lot more with less hardware. You also get resale value. Try selling your Android device after a year or two. You won't get much for it.
  • Reply 44 of 158
    coolfactor wrote: »
    Is the fingerprint sensor the only way to unlock an Android phone now, or does the traditional passcode still work? I think it's the latter so there is no "have to" with regards to the fingerprint sensor.

    But I wouldn't know because I'm Apple all the way, Not sure where you gleaned an assumption that I was anti-Apple? :\   That's what's odd here.

    Ugh... passcodes. That's why I love fingerprint sensors.

    I assumed you were all-Apple. I didn't meant to start an argument!
  • Reply 45 of 158

    It wouldn't make sense for Google to put a fingerprint sensor on the front because Android since version 3 (2012) uses soft buttons instead of hardware hardware buttons. In Apple's case the fingerprint sensor is also the Home button but it would be strange for Google to add a fingerprint/home button after all these years.

  • Reply 46 of 158
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,039member
    coolfactor wrote: »
    Is the fingerprint sensor the only way to unlock an Android phone now, or does the traditional passcode still work? I think it's the latter so there is no "have to" with regards to the fingerprint sensor.

    But I wouldn't know because I'm Apple all the way, Not sure where you gleaned an assumption that I was anti-Apple? :\   That's what's odd here.
    A fingerprint scan won't be required for wake AFAIK. The traditional unlock methods (or no lock at all) still work. Android Pay may well require it tho.

    EDIT: Here's better info on your question about unlocking and notifications:

    "The natural starting point is the lock screen, which shows more information and now offers quicker access to the camera and voice search. Double-tapping the power button brings up the camera app. Swiping up and in from the lower-left of the screen opens Google Voice Search. When a phone is charging, the lock screen says whether the phone is charging quickly and how long it will take to charge in full.

    On phones with Google's Android Sensor Hub, picking up devices like the Nexus 5X and 6P will wake the screen in a low-power, white-on-black mode that shows the time and any pending notifications. From the low-power mode, touching a notification wakes the phone fully and shows details about the selected notification.

    Notifications have been updated in more places than the lock screen, too. Touching a notification when it appears at the top of the screen will show more information and give quick access to tools for taking action, like a quick interface to reply to text messages. "
  • Reply 47 of 158
    coolfactor wrote: »


    The fingerprint sensor on the back-middle is not a bad design, it's just different. If you hold the phone in your hand, it's easy to place one of your fingers onto it. Contrary, the iPhone's sensor is better suited for scanning the thumb when held in the hand, right?

    I'm just surprised that suddenly all of these iPhone competitors are getting fingerprint sensors with very little discussion around how secure they are? Apple made a big deal about how secure their scanner was, so why has it been so easy for the rest of the industry to suddenly embrace this? Have there been some compromises in reliability and security?

    I can unlock my iPhone with my thumb as I remove it from my pocket. It's unlocked before I even look at it.

    But my point earlier was having my iPhone sitting on my desk. I can use my thumb or index finger to unlock it without lifting it up. Very fast and convenient.

    These Nexus phones will have to be picked up and a finger slide under to unlock it from a desk. Seems odd to me.

    But like fallonjt said... there's nowhere else to put a fingerprint sensor that someone else hasn't done before. (if companies even worry about that sort of thing)

    When you think about it it's much faster and natural to pick up a face down phone than a face up one.
  • Reply 48 of 158
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 3,972member
    seankill wrote: »
    First off, your improper words are a pretty good start to discrediting everything you say. 

    Second, same OS? Compared to Apple? No. Compared to Samsung? Technically, however, the overlay is completely different and bloated (Samsung is quite famous for this). Compared to what? I am not following you here. 

    Now back to the point, you say my argument is stupid? If I pay more for something, I expect to get more. That is the logic everyone follows. Granted the iPhone is much better; however, it is also much more expensive (70% more expensive), so I expect more for the premium. If I buy a phone that is $270 more than another, it is not unreasonable to expect more storage onboard. To complain about a $250 phone or a $380 phone with 16GB is to absolutely shame a $650 phone with 16GB. If I buy a computer for $2,000 instead of $1,000, I expect more storage space (along with better specs across the board), regardless of OS. This is the same logic everyone typically follows; there is nothing idiotic about it. I understand, you must protect you prefect Apple but the company is not prefect nor are all of its products. Apple is simply pushing everyone up to 750$ phones which is quite clever given that the iPhone component costs are climbing. 
    my apology for using improper language. Now back to the point. My argument about starting storage of 16GB is about usability which is not different between cheaper and more expensive phones. People have been complaining about this 16GB on the usability,
  • Reply 49 of 158
    dasanman69 wrote: »
    When you think about it it's much faster and natural to pick up a face down phone than a face up one.

    If the phone is face-down... you have to pick up the phone to flip it over to reveal the screen.

    Or... have the phone face up and the glorious screen is already looking at you. Just press the button and enjoy! :)
  • Reply 50 of 158
    Exactly.

    I have my iPhone sitting next to me on my desk. I can unlock my phone by simply pressing on the home button and letting TouchID do its thing.

    How would you unlock the Nexus phone if the fingerprint sensor is on the back of the phone... facing down on the desk?
    Top it off is the 5X that has the finger print reader down from the camera lens, I am sure users would get crazy wonder why the reader is not working at all when they actually have their finger smudging the lens. SJ would smash any phone with a finger print reader on the back into pieces.
  • Reply 51 of 158
    mubaili wrote: »
    Top it off is the 5X that has the finger print reader down from the camera lens, I am sure users would get crazy wonder why the reader is not working at all when they actually have their finger smudging the lens. SJ would smash any phone with a finger print reader on the back into pieces.

    Haha. Like I said earlier... USABILITY!
  • Reply 52 of 158
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,039member
    If the phone is face-down... you have to pick up the phone to flip it over to reveal the screen.

    Or... have the phone face up and the glorious screen is already looking at you. Just press the button and enjoy! :)
    Heck, the Moto X doesn't even need that. Wave your hand over it, no button press required.
  • Reply 53 of 158
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,039member
    mubaili wrote: »
    Top it off is the 5X that has the finger print reader down from the camera lens, I am sure users would get crazy wonder why the reader is not working at all when they actually have their finger smudging the lens. SJ would smash any phone with a finger print reader on the back into pieces.
    In practice I personally doubt that will be a problem. The dimple on the back may be placed where your fingers would normally land, making it a non-issue. If it's not where it belongs and convenient to the user you'll see the complaints about it soon enough.
  • Reply 54 of 158
    gatorguy wrote: »
    Heck, the Moto X doesn't even need that. Wave your hand over it, no button press required.

    How does it know it's you?

    Can anyone unlock your phone with a hand-wave?
  • Reply 55 of 158
    dasanman69 wrote: »
    When you think about it it's much faster and natural to pick up a face down phone than a face up one.

    If the phone is face-down... you have to pick up the phone to flip it over to reveal the screen.

    Or... have the phone face up and the glorious screen is already looking at you. Just press the button and enjoy! :)

    You're right but if you have to interact with the phone it's easier to pick up face down because a hands' natural state is palm down.
  • Reply 56 of 158
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 20,039member
    How does it know it's you?

    Can anyone unlock your phone with a hand-wave?
    If a lockscreen hasn't been set yes they could. Believe it or not a lot of folks don't bother with passcodes and other unlocking methods. I only recently set up unlocking myself and only because my phone is occasionally used for tap-n-pay. Otherwise I'm not concerned about keeping it locked.
  • Reply 57 of 158
    gatorguy wrote: »
    In practice I personally doubt that will be a problem. The dimple on the back may be placed where your fingers would normally land, making it a non-issue. If it's not where it belongs and convenient to the user you'll see the complaints about it soon enough.

    I agree that your finger will naturally land in the dimple when removing your phone from your pocket.

    For the record... my thumbs naturally lands on the TouchID sensor on the iPhone too when removing the phone from my pocket.

    Pockets are fine.

    My issue is when a phone is sitting on a table or desk. A fingerprint sensor on the back will be... well... on the back.

    I dunno.... I guess I've been spoiled by Apple's front-facing home button and TouchID.

    I actually feel the same way about LG's buttons on the back. Great if the phone is in your hand... not so great if the phone is resting on a surface.

    That would be like putting a power button UNDER a Macbook.... not really... but yeah.
  • Reply 58 of 158
    gatorguy wrote: »
    If a lockscreen hasn't been set yes they could. Believe it or not a lot of folks don't bother with passcodes and other unlocking methods. I only recently set up unlocking myself and only because my phone is occasionally used for tap-n-pay. Otherwise I'm not concerned about keeping it locked.

    I didn't use a passcode until I had TouchID.

    Too much of a pain to input it dozens (hundreds?) of times a day.
  • Reply 59 of 158
    65026502 Posts: 148member
    Are there any American companies that make Android phones? I don't necessarily mean made in America, but the company that makes it is American. I can't think of one off hand, now that Motorola is Chinese.
  • Reply 60 of 158
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Michael Scrip View Post





    Exactly.



    I have my iPhone sitting next to me on my desk. I can unlock my phone by simply pressing on the home button and letting TouchID do its thing.



    How would you unlock the Nexus phone if the fingerprint sensor is on the back of the phone... facing down on the desk?



    At least, in that particular case, Google did not blatantly copy Apple's TouchID location like Samsung did.

    The question now is whether to SamsungPay or AndroidPay?  I say neither.

Sign In or Register to comment.