iPad Pro reviews: great hardware, but potential is limited thanks to iOS

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Comments

  • Reply 141 of 180
    spheric wrote: »
    No, it's only on iPad.

    I used it on my iPhone 6 Plus in the iOS 9 betas.
  • Reply 142 of 180
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,652member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

     

    iOS is only limited to those who grew up in the mouse/Microsoft world.

     

    For people under 25 the ipad Pro is the laptop for those who never owned a laptop.

     

    Admit it.  The laptop is dying along with the older generation.  Its up to software makers to realize this and start building serious software for iOS.  Apple has provided the hardware now.

     

     

    Ordered for pickup today:  128GB gold Wifi

     

     

    haters can hate. They hate what they don't and will never understand.




    I grew up in that mouse/Microsoft world.  Heck, my first "computer" was an Atari 1200XL (awesome PC btw)...



    I'm ashamed when I read some reviewer harping that they want to use a mouse on an iPad, or that the keyboard is limited for full PC-like work.  They have issues.  If you want a PC, get a PC.  Maybe buy that crappy Surface-Pro that no one is buying.  Heck, do the best compromise and buy a Macbook, but the iPad is a tablet.  Done.



    A agree... younger folks that grew up more in the iOS era will have zero problem using this as their primary computing device because frankly, they haven't really fully-grasped how us older folks were able to get any work done using our antiquated methods of computing.



    /rant



    Now.. back to waiting for my i7 iMac that's been ordered weeks ago from Adorama, that has yet to ship.

  • Reply 143 of 180
    sphericspheric Posts: 1,764member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismY View Post





    I used it on my iPhone 6 Plus in the iOS 9 betas.



    Yes, but running iOS 9 releases, it's only on the iPad.

  • Reply 144 of 180
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismY View Post





    I do assume those same people are the ones that didn't want the ODD to go away, and then had reasons like reinstalling the OS to loading video games that need to run off the CD.



    When Apple makes an ARM-based notebook they are going to lose their shit.



    All these comments floating around including the ones from Tim Cook are ridiculous. For Tim to say why would anyone buy a laptop is an idiotic comment and a pathetic attempt to boost slumping iPad sales. The iPad Pro can not support a trackpad because iOS is a weak operating system. There is no other reason, it's the limitations of the OS. The iPad will never replace the Mac until it can run OS X or dual boot. 

     

    Lets not pretend that Apple is going in some cutting edge direction. The day iOS can handle a trackpad there is no doubt the keyboard will then have a trackpad. 

     

    Lets remember Force Touch came to the Macbook first via a trackpad. For anyone to debate that having to remove your hands from a keyboard to reach up and touch the screen provides a better user experience is a foolish argument. 

  • Reply 145 of 180
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,312member
    foggyhill wrote: »
    True, a filesystem is a sucky way to do thing when data may be all over the place, inside app, accross the net.
    Ideally, you want a view at your data, not know where it is.
    Of course, there is all that thing about ownership and privacy that looms under the filesystem fans.
    If data was properly identified, you could rebuild any view that suits you (even emulate a filesystem if you wish), from data who knows where.

    People that cling to it seems to be stuck in the 1960s; they probably shuddered at the dissaperance of physical media.

    Rebuilding your own filesystem to view as you want? Now that's geeky. Also possible in OS X with metadata search. An advanced feature.

    A filesystem doesn't have to be complicated. Most computer newbies, if any these days, get the concept within a few minutes. Folders are abstracts of their real life analogues– places to group files.
  • Reply 146 of 180
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,448member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bsenka View Post





    I hope so. Wacom's got a huge head start, but I'd be delighted if Apple tries to catch them.



    It's frankly surprising the folks around here haven't already started beating the drum that Apple will put Wacom out of business just like the ?Watch will put the Swiss watch makers out of business, and the iPhone will put Android out of business, and the MacBook and iPad will put Microsoft out of business, et al...

  • Reply 147 of 180
    mac_128 wrote: »

    It's frankly surprising the folks around here haven't already started beating the drum that Apple will put Wacom out of business just like the ?Watch will put the Swiss watch makers out of business, and the iPhone will put Android out of business, and the MacBook and iPad will put Microsoft out of business, et al...

    Huh? How would the announcement of the iPhone have put Android out of business when it wasn't anything but a startup that didn't even have a product yet, much less a mobile OS. That didn't happen until 2009.
  • Reply 148 of 180
    sphericspheric Posts: 1,764member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by asdasd View Post





    You expect office workers to stare down at their desks from now on on? 

     

    Heavens, no. Doing accounting work with a writing utensil on a pad placed directly on a desk, day in, day out? 

     

    Unimaginable!

     

     

    It is not just the tools that fit the work, asdasd, but the work changes as the tools provide new possibilities.

  • Reply 149 of 180
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by sflocal View Post

     



    I grew up in that mouse/Microsoft world.  Heck, my first "computer" was an Atari 1200XL (awesome PC btw)...



    I'm ashamed when I read some reviewer harping that they want to use a mouse on an iPad, or that the keyboard is limited for full PC-like work.  They have issues.  If you want a PC, get a PC.  Maybe buy that crappy Surface-Pro that no one is buying.  Heck, do the best compromise and buy a Macbook, but the iPad is a tablet.  Done.



    A agree... younger folks that grew up more in the iOS era will have zero problem using this as their primary computing device because frankly, they haven't really fully-grasped how us older folks were able to get any work done using our antiquated methods of computing.



    /rant



    Now.. back to waiting for my i7 iMac that's been ordered weeks ago from Adorama, that has yet to ship.




    Not having a trackpad would be fine if Tim Cook wasn't trying to promote this as a laptop replacement. I agree if you need a laptop then get one, yet don't buy into the talking points that this device can actually replace a macbook pro or even a windows based pc. 

     

    A generation gap has nothing to do with any of this, remember force touch was a trackpad feature first. This is typical Apple talking points, tell everyone you don't need something until they can get the technology to work then all of a sudden a trackpad on the iPad Pro keyboard will be a great idea. 

     

    This is very much along the lines of early version of iOS nothing being able to multi task or split screen function, people would argue here it was not needed or a gimmick now it's freaking awesome because Apple has actually caught up with everyone else. 

  • Reply 150 of 180
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,448member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by plovell View Post



    I wonder how long it will be before Apple releases the dual-boot option so that this hardware can run either iOS or OS X.



    From what I can tell, the hardware power is there. It'll need more than 128 GB though.



    I don't see what's wrong with just having the iPad serve as a dumb display for the MacBook, allowing one to separate them and use the display as a stand alone iPad and the keyboard/CPU separately with an external display. Maybe even have a shared contents synch between them, so that certain files are always available on both when separated. 

     

    I'd buy that in a heartbeat.

     

    OS X will eventually have touch screen functionality, once it's more iOS-like. At the moment it doesn't make much sense. I know there are times, when I'd prefer to reach out and select something directly on my MacBook screen, but for most it would cause more confusion than the convenience it would serve. By the time that happens, Siri driven voice commands may be doing a lot of what we'd need to touch, and use a mouse and keyboard for anyway.

  • Reply 151 of 180
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by asdasd View Post



    A filesystem doesn't have to be complicated. Most computer newbies, if any these days, get the concept within a few minutes. Folders are abstracts of their real life analogues– places to group files.

    True, a filesystem doesn't have to be complicated, but more than that it *shouldn't* be complicated. People understand folders, but not to indicate location so much as to indicate a category or theme applied to a file or set of files as a way of organising them. The location of files is the one thing that continues to confound some people, new users and old alike, especially in the world of local storage-network or NAS-cloud computing we now find ourselves.

  • Reply 152 of 180
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by williamlondon View Post

     

    Sorry, but this seems a list of excuses, rather than a list of issues any such filesystem must overcome, and I think all of them can be easily resolved by clever architects and engineers. 


    It is just my experience and job tasks that involve working directly with files. I have hundreds of thousands of files and I do a pretty good job of keeping them organized. I use a pseudo meta-data system of my own design utilizing file naming conventions. I use extremely long, very descriptive file names that also include a literature number, the date and revision number. Our company has ISO compliance and this type of file management is required by the auditors. I also built an elaborate document management system in PHP / MySql which is running on a remote server and it is used corporate wide by our offices around the globe. Personally, I see no disadvantages and lots of advantages to using a hierarchical file system. It works well for us and is compatible with all of our various OS platforms. Legacy is not necessarily a bad word. I have servers that have been running 24/7 for more than 10 years. When you have as much data as we do, making extreme changes for no apparent gain just doesn't make sense.

  • Reply 153 of 180
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by spheric View Post

     

     

    Heavens, no. Doing accounting work with a writing utensil on a pad placed directly on a desk, day in, day out? 

     

    Unimaginable!

     

     

    It is not just the tools that fit the work, asdasd, but the work changes as the tools provide new possibilities.




    Not very ergonomical. Employee productivity decrease with fatigue and I see a lot of neck and back strain in that photo.  

  • Reply 154 of 180
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    solipsismy wrote: »
    Huh? How would the announcement of the iPhone have put Android out of business when it wasn't anything but a startup that didn't even have a product yet, much less a mobile OS. That didn't happen until 2009.

    Also, who said Apple Watch would put Swiss watchmakers out of business?
  • Reply 155 of 180
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mstone View Post

     

    It is just my experience and job tasks that involve working directly with files. I have hundreds of thousands of files and I do a pretty good job of keeping them organized. I use a pseudo meta-data system of my own design utilizing file naming conventions. I use extremely long, very descriptive file names that also include a literature number, the date and revision number. Our company has ISO compliance and this type of file management is required by the auditors. I also built an elaborate document management system in PHP / MySql which is running on a remote server and it is used corporate wide by our offices around the globe. Personally, I see no disadvantages and lots of advantages to using a hierarchical file system. It works well for us and is compatible with all of our various OS platforms. Legacy is not necessarily a bad word. I have servers that have been running 24/7 for more than 10 years. When you have as much data as we do, making extreme changes for no apparent gain just doesn't make sense.




    And what I think is that people like you are exactly the ones that I would consult when thinking about things like metadata and tags as they relate to file systems, because what you take for granted or perhaps have as base knowledge (based I'm sure on lots of years of experience), none of the rest of us enjoy so easily and most of us struggle to keep things tidy and well organised. No one should ever be required to know that much to benefit from that sort of knowledge, if that makes sense. I suppose what I'm saying is we need to take systems like yours and make them simple and basic and core to any file system of the future.

  • Reply 156 of 180
    sphericspheric Posts: 1,764member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AtlApple View Post

     



    Not having a trackpad would be fine if Tim Cook wasn't trying to promote this as a laptop replacement. I agree if you need a laptop then get one, yet don't buy into the talking points that this device can actually replace a macbook pro or even a windows based pc. 


     

    The point you're missing is actually a rather simple, if deviously simple, one: 

     

    The iPad isn't going to replace a laptop for anyone who needs a laptop.

     

    It is replacing laptops for everybody who's been buying a laptop solely because there weren't any other options

     

    This applies to virtually all "home computing". Not archival work, not professional content production, not research work — iPad has a space in all those contexts, but mostly as a supplemental device (I couldn't imagine my job without the iPad, but I wouldn't be able to do it without the laptop, either). 

     

    But for the home user, who mostly surfs the web, books vacations, reads magazines, organizes and edits photos, creates and uploads the odd home movie, and maybe casually creates music, and writes the odd letter and such: Why do these people need a laptop? The iOS platform already supplies most all of their needs, in a far nicer and more accessible form. 

  • Reply 157 of 180
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by spheric View Post

     

     

    The point you're missing is actually a rather simple, if deviously simple, one: 

     

    The iPad isn't going to replace a laptop for anyone who needs a laptop.

     

    It is replacing laptops for everybody who's been buying a laptop solely because there weren't any other options

     

    This applies to virtually all "home computing". Not archival work, not professional content production, not research work — iPad has a space in all those contexts, but mostly as a supplemental device (I couldn't imagine my job without the iPad, but I wouldn't be able to do it without the laptop, either). 

     

    But for the home user, who mostly surfs the web, books vacations, reads magazines, organizes and edits photos, creates and uploads the odd home movie, and maybe casually creates music, and writes the odd letter and such: Why do these people need a laptop? The iOS platform already supplies most all of their needs, in a far nicer and more accessible form. 


     

    More than that... All mainstream software developers have committed to iPad: IBM, Microsoft, Autodesk, Adobe to name a few. Positioning the iPad as a household gadget doesn't explain that huge commitment from the software giants.

     

    Tim Cook is right, with the help of software giants the iPad Pro competes head-to-head with laptops and desktop PCs...

  • Reply 158 of 180
    More than that... All mainstream software developers have committed to iPad: IBM, Microsoft, Autodesk, Adobe to name a few. Positioning the iPad as a household gadget doesn't explain that huge commitment from the software giants.

    Tim Cook is right, with the help of software giants the iPad Pro competes head-to-head with laptops and desktop PCs...

    That doesn't affect a damn thing [@]spheric[/@] said. In fact it backs it up: "The iPad isn't going to replace a laptop for anyone who needs a laptop."
  • Reply 159 of 180
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SolipsismY View Post





    That doesn't affect a damn thing @spheric said. In fact it backs it up: "The iPad isn't going to replace a laptop for anyone who needs a laptop."



    I agree but the home user then is just an example. Those who won't need laptops or PCs anymore are NOT limited to home users... That is the key message TC strives to communicate...

  • Reply 160 of 180
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,312member
    spheric wrote: »
    The point you're missing is actually a rather simple, if deviously simple, one: 

    The iPad isn't going to replace a laptop for anyone who needs a laptop.

    It is replacing laptops for everybody who's been buying a laptop solely because there weren't any other options

    This applies to virtually all "home computing". Not archival work, not professional content production, not research work — iPad has a space in all those contexts, but mostly as a supplemental device (I couldn't imagine my job without the iPad, but I wouldn't be able to do it without the laptop, either). 

    But for the home user, who mostly surfs the web, books vacations, reads magazines, organizes and edits photos, creates and uploads the odd home movie, and maybe casually creates music, and writes the odd letter and such: Why do these people need a laptop? The iOS platform already supplies most all of their needs, in a far nicer and more accessible form. 

    Yes but we are talking about the iPad Pro where Pro means professional. I'm not denying that for consumer use it can replace laptops (frankly my 6+ replaces both the laptop and the iPad – which is too heavy – for casual browsing). Earlier posters following on from Cook seemed to think that the relationship between laptops and tablets is full replacement, like cars replacing horse drawn carriages. It's more like cars not replacing trains but suplementing them.

    However this is about the iPad pro and not the mini or the cheaper iPads, so we have to debate on whether it's going to replace work machines. I don't think so.
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