iPhone controlled 40% of US smartphone market in 2015, data shows

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Apple secured 40 percent of the U.S. smartphone market in 2015, though close competitor Samsung managed to gain ground, according to a research report published on Wednesday.




Samsung achieved a 31 percent share, Parks Associates noted. That further cemented the company's position as the second-most popular phone vendor in the U.S., easily surpassing third-place LG, which managed just 10 percent. Motorola and HTC ranked fourth and fifth, respectively.

Parks' data also suggested that a third of iPhone owners are still using a model over two years old, slightly higher than the 30 percent of Samsung owners. 45 percent of all American broadband households are said to wait two years to upgrade a smartphone.

Apple's home country has always been the most important iPhone market. Countries like China and Japan have also become stalwarts however, and indeed China is eventually expected to eclipse the U.S. in terms of Apple revenues.

Apple's position may have benefited from Samsung stumbling early in the year. The Samsung Galaxy S6 did not sell as well as initially expected, owing partly to the company overproducing too many standard S6 models and not enough Edge variants. It eventually managed to correct the issue, and revived some interest later in the year by releasing the Galaxy Note 5 and S6 Edge+.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 22
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 1,852member
    Number of units is perhaps interesting, but ultimately meaningless. The real number that matters is how much of the profit in cellphones is held by iPhone.
    patchythepiratejbdragonlollivercornchip
  • Reply 2 of 22
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    Samsung must have gained ground because of all those Android users jumping ship to iPhone 6s.
    singularitydasanman69cornchip
  • Reply 3 of 22
    cnocbui said:
    Samsung must have gained ground because of all those Android users jumping ship to iPhone 6s.
    That's probably true, actually, though you probably meant it as a smart-arse remark. Android switchers are mostly likely to come from lesser Android "smartphones" that barely qualify for the term, and Apple's gains came mostly from them (though the larger wave of Android switchers is outside the US as you are apparently unaware). Samsung's gains probably came from people UPGRADING their Android phone from lesser brands to Samsung (or switching from BB and Windows Phone), as well as those who've chosen Samsung for various reasons (like the Note, which is a pretty nice AIO phablet).
  • Reply 4 of 22
    trumptmantrumptman Posts: 16,443member
    We've always been an iPhone household but this year both of my sons jumped ship to Android phones. They both bought themselves the One Plus X even though I had given them an iPhone 5S an iPhone 5 as hand me downs. I love how all my stuff connects across all my Apple devices, iPad, MacBook Pro and iPhone. They own a Windows PC, Chromebook and now an Adroid phones.

    We tried so hard to raise them right.
    jony0anantksundaramlollivercornchip
  • Reply 5 of 22
    trumptman said:
    We've always been an iPhone household but this year both of my sons jumped ship to Android phones. They both bought themselves the One Plus X even though I had given them an iPhone 5S an iPhone 5 as hand me downs. I love how all my stuff connects across all my Apple devices, iPad, MacBook Pro and iPhone. They own a Windows PC, Chromebook and now an Adroid phones.

    We tried so hard to raise them right.
    I have used multiple different types of platforms and have always had all my stuff work seamlessly across all of them. Even now with my iPhone as my main driver all my stuff is right there when I need it on any other system. 
  • Reply 6 of 22
    MacProMacPro Posts: 16,941member
    Not a mention of Microsoft.  I wonder if they held a mock funeral for their phones yet?

  • Reply 7 of 22
    Not a mention of Microsoft.  I wonder if they held a mock funeral for their phones yet?

    Mock funeral?  That will be a real one.
    suddenly newtonjony0lollivercornchipcali
  • Reply 8 of 22
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 3,895member
    You know it pretty easy to be Number two in a large market when you not making money on what you sell. The market should be all over Samsung for not being number one and making no proofits. Low margins business is automatic guaranty for the number one position.
    nostrathomasnolamacguy
  • Reply 9 of 22
    "45 percent of all American broadband households are said to wait two years to upgrade a smartphone." Rest of the article is fairly interesting but this is an odd stat. What does this even mean? Households don't upgrade their phones and why are we focused on households who have broadband? There's nothing else in here about homes with broadband so the context also seems awkward here.
  • Reply 10 of 22
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,351member
    This is another pointless clickbaity title... Samsung had a very very very bad year and hey, they gained market share selling shit phones, well I'm sure they're happy to be selling crapload of phones at a near loss.
  • Reply 11 of 22
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    chas_m said:
    cnocbui said:
    Samsung must have gained ground because of all those Android users jumping ship to iPhone 6s.
    That's probably true, actually, though you probably meant it as a smart-arse remark. Android switchers are mostly likely to come from lesser Android "smartphones" that barely qualify for the term, and Apple's gains came mostly from them (though the larger wave of Android switchers is outside the US as you are apparently unaware). Samsung's gains probably came from people UPGRADING their Android phone from lesser brands to Samsung (or switching from BB and Windows Phone), as well as those who've chosen Samsung for various reasons (like the Note, which is a pretty nice AIO phablet).
    There is constant switching both ways.  CompareMyMobile.com said that 9.8% of trade-ins for a 6s/+ were coming from a Samsung while 16.9% of trade-ins for a Samsung S6/Edge were coming from an iPhone.
    singularity
  • Reply 12 of 22
    jfc1138jfc1138 Posts: 3,090member
    "45 percent of all American broadband households are said to wait two years to upgrade a smartphone." Rest of the article is fairly interesting but this is an odd stat. What does this even mean? Households don't upgrade their phones and why are we focused on households who have broadband? There's nothing else in here about homes with broadband so the context also seems awkward here.
    Likely the survey unit of the poll so that's what got reported. Anyone in the household upgrading their phone marked the household as an upgrade.

    From the report: "In advance of Mobile World Congress this month, Parks Associates released new mobile research today showing 86% of U.S. broadband households now own a smartphone. "

    http://www.parksassociates.com/blog/article/pr-02102016-mwc
    edited February 2016
  • Reply 13 of 22
    larryalarrya Posts: 461member
    Not a mention of Microsoft.  I wonder if they held a mock funeral for their phones yet?

    I have to say, few things in the last few years have been as satisfying to watch as the failure of Windows phone after such a distasteful display, and after their squandering of their pre-iPhone advantage, and after having personally suffered with Windows Mobile 6.5 before that. 
  • Reply 14 of 22
    croprcropr Posts: 676member
    eightzero said:
    Number of units is perhaps interesting, but ultimately meaningless. The real number that matters is how much of the profit in cellphones is held by iPhone.
    Both figures are important. 

    If the absolute number of iPhones would drop too much, the eco system is hurt. I own a software company developing iOS and Android  app for companies in Belgium and the Netherlands.  The iPhone market share in the Netherlands is much lower than in Belgium.  In the Netherlands I get customer requests for Android apps only ("later we may want a port to iOS").  In Belgium I always have to supply both versions simultaneously.

    Bear in mind that some Android manufacturers are using the  printer model.  They sell the printer/smartphone at cost and make the profits on the ink/accessoires.  LG is in that mode.  Samsung to a lesser extend as well.  For them the profit on the phone is less important, the absolute selling numbers are driving other profitable business.  Google is successfully doing the same with  Android and its ads business
    singularitycnocbui
  • Reply 15 of 22
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 3,164member
    cropr said:
    eightzero said:
    Number of units is perhaps interesting, but ultimately meaningless. The real number that matters is how much of the profit in cellphones is held by iPhone.
    Both figures are important. 

    If the absolute number of iPhones would drop too much, the eco system is hurt. I own a software company developing iOS and Android  app for companies in Belgium and the Netherlands.  The iPhone market share in the Netherlands is much lower than in Belgium.  In the Netherlands I get customer requests for Android apps only ("later we may want a port to iOS").  In Belgium I always have to supply both versions simultaneously.

    Bear in mind that some Android manufacturers are using the  printer model.  They sell the printer/smartphone at cost and make the profits on the ink/accessoires.  LG is in that mode.  Samsung to a lesser extend as well.  For them the profit on the phone is less important, the absolute selling numbers are driving other profitable business.  Google is successfully doing the same with  Android and its ads business
    What is the 'ink' when buying a mobile phone?
    nolamacguycornchip
  • Reply 16 of 22
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,351member
    cropr said:
    eightzero said:
    Number of units is perhaps interesting, but ultimately meaningless. The real number that matters is how much of the profit in cellphones is held by iPhone.
    Both figures are important. 

    If the absolute number of iPhones would drop too much, the eco system is hurt. I own a software company developing iOS and Android  app for companies in Belgium and the Netherlands.  The iPhone market share in the Netherlands is much lower than in Belgium.  In the Netherlands I get customer requests for Android apps only ("later we may want a port to iOS").  In Belgium I always have to supply both versions simultaneously.

    Bear in mind that some Android manufacturers are using the  printer model.  They sell the printer/smartphone at cost and make the profits on the ink/accessoires.  LG is in that mode.  Samsung to a lesser extend as well.  For them the profit on the phone is less important, the absolute selling numbers are driving other profitable business.  Google is successfully doing the same with  Android and its ads business
    Considering Google is making as much money from IOS (probably more considering expenditures) and this so called service model (like printers!!!) is NOT reflected in Samsung or LG financials in any way, I don't know what the hell your talking about. At least use reality in your so called argument.
    nolamacguy
  • Reply 17 of 22
    jfc1138 said:
    "45 percent of all American broadband households are said to wait two years to upgrade a smartphone." Rest of the article is fairly interesting but this is an odd stat. What does this even mean? Households don't upgrade their phones and why are we focused on households who have broadband? There's nothing else in here about homes with broadband so the context also seems awkward here.
    Likely the survey unit of the poll so that's what got reported. Anyone in the household upgrading their phone marked the household as an upgrade.

    From the report: "In advance of Mobile World Congress this month, Parks Associates released new mobile research today showing 86% of U.S. broadband households now own a smartphone. "

    http://www.parksassociates.com/blog/article/pr-02102016-mwc
    Oh, I see. The line is lifted directly from the report without attribution. Quote marks would have helped. This is bordering on plagiarism.  :|
  • Reply 18 of 22
    We currently upgrade every 2-3 years.  With the introduction of the Apple upgrade program this may change.  When we upgrade our phones this year we will be choosing that program.  There are 2 choices: pay off the phone in 2 years and get to keep it.  After that you do not pay anything until you get a new phone.  Alternatively get a new phone every year and continue to pay the monthly fee.  If you get a new phone every 2 years you get to keep the old phone but end up paying the same as having a new phone every year.
    I'm betting a lot of people who join the program will end up renewing every year.  It is very tempting especially if in the past you get a new phone one the contract expires.  That will shift the frequency of upgrades to a shorter time frame and increase Apple's unit sales significantly.
  • Reply 19 of 22
    cropr said:
    eightzero said:
    Number of units is perhaps interesting, but ultimately meaningless. The real number that matters is how much of the profit in cellphones is held by iPhone.
    Both figures are important. 

    If the absolute number of iPhones would drop too much, the eco system is hurt. I own a software company developing iOS and Android  app for companies in Belgium and the Netherlands.  The iPhone market share in the Netherlands is much lower than in Belgium.  In the Netherlands I get customer requests for Android apps only ("later we may want a port to iOS").  In Belgium I always have to supply both versions simultaneously.

    Bear in mind that some Android manufacturers are using the  printer model.  They sell the printer/smartphone at cost and make the profits on the ink/accessoires.  LG is in that mode.  Samsung to a lesser extend as well.  For them the profit on the phone is less important, the absolute selling numbers are driving other profitable business.  Google is successfully doing the same with  Android and its ads business
    er, whats the high-margin "ink" for Samsung and LG, after they fail to make much profit selling the device?
    cornchip
  • Reply 20 of 22
    chas_m said:
    cnocbui said:
    Samsung must have gained ground because of all those Android users jumping ship to iPhone 6s.
    That's probably true, actually, though you probably meant it as a smart-arse remark. Android switchers are mostly likely to come from lesser Android "smartphones" that barely qualify for the term, and Apple's gains came mostly from them (though the larger wave of Android switchers is outside the US as you are apparently unaware). Samsung's gains probably came from people UPGRADING their Android phone from lesser brands to Samsung (or switching from BB and Windows Phone), as well as those who've chosen Samsung for various reasons (like the Note, which is a pretty nice AIO phablet).
    "lesser Android "smartphones" that barely qualify for the term" 2011 called and wants its talking points back. While this may have been true in the past, advances in the OS, hardware and manufacturing means that the "barely qualify for the term" thing is no longer true, and hasn't been for awhile. $200 will now get you a smartphone with 2 GB of RAM, 1080p screen, and a 2 GHz quad core 64 bit processor made by Intel or Qualcomm. As a consequence, it can run the same productivity apps (not to mention gaming, social networking, streaming, multimedia) as the iPhone 6 (apps exclusive to iOS notwithstanding). As a matter of fact, the Nexus 5X now sells $299! Also, even the truly cheap phones from ZTE, Kyocera, Blu and other "off-brands" that can be had for less than $100 by the savvy shopper will run most smartphone apps and perform reasonably well doing so, with the caveat that one should not expect much in the way ofmulti-tasking, and there will be other such tradeoffs as occasional glitches, a bunch of unwanted apps that you cannot uninstall, small batteries and cheap 720p IPS LCD screens. So, the only reason to "trade up" from a Moto G to a Galaxy S6 or LG G4 (for example) is wanting a faster CPU, more RAM, a better screen plus extra hardware features (i.e stylus support, IR blaster, NFC, fingerprint scanner). Similarly, the only reason to go from a Moto G to an iPhone 6 is faster performance plus the many benefits that the iOS/Mac OS X ecosystem provides. Also, the "Android users switching to iPhone" was merely so much hype by Tim Cook. Even when the switching was at its peak during 2nd quarter 2014 and 1st quarter 2015, Cook never provided hard numbers on the switching, let alone statistical or other analysis. Also, after 1Q 2015, evidence strongly suggests that while Apple did continue to pick up a lot of former Android customers, more people may have actually left iOS for Android in turn.
    dasanman69
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