Apple, Inc set to open new $25 million tech center in Hyderabad, India by June

Posted:
in General Discussion
Apple is reportedly opening its first technology development located in India, on 250,000 sq ft of land within the IT corridor of Hyderabad, next to facilities for Microsoft, Infosys, Wipro and Cognizant, reportedly within Tishman Speyer's WaveRock facility.

WaveRock facilities in Hyderabad, India
WaveRock facilities in Hyderabad, India | Source: Tishman Speyer


According to a report by V L Srinivasan for ZDNet, Apple is spending $25 million on the project, which is said to involve jobs for 4,500.

India's Telangana State Technology Services managing director GT Venkateshwar Rao told the site that Apple's decision to locate facilities in Hyderabad would boost the city's image as a hub for technology development.

"Microsoft's Windows 10 was developed in Hyderabad, but it has been a global product now," Rao said. Both Microsoft and Google have announced plans to invest in India.

Microsoft's chief Satya Nadella has described expanding its existing facilities and further efforts to take advantage of India's status as the third largest site for startups behind the U.S. and U.K., and Google's chief Sundar Pichai recently outlined a "huge new campus in Hyderabad" costing $160 million, described as Google's first campus outside of the U.S and "said to be the biggest in South Asia."

In 2006, Apple announced plans to open a product support center in Bangalore, but abandoned the effort three months later. Apple's PR chief Steve Dowling said at the time that Apple had "re-evaluated our plans, and have decided to put our planned support center growth in other countries."

More recently, Apple's sales in India crossed the $1 billion sales mark last March, and the company has been working with the Indian government to fast-track the construction of new Apple Stores in the country, an issue formerly complicated by regulations pertaining to foreign ownership of retail stores that sell a single brand.

Apple international



While Srinivasan called Apple's plans for Hyderabad the company's "first offshore technology development centre outside the United States," Apple operates a number of international facilities, including a site in Cork, Ireland that involves manufacturing, customer care, finance, and global supply chain management.

That facility was reportedly under consideration for major expansion last summer.

Apple also announced plans last month to open its first iOS App Development Center in Naples, Italy.


Apple R&D site in Cambridge, UK


The company has also opened research and development offices (above) in Cambridge, UK next to Microsoft, Sony, Siemens, Qualcomm and Huawei, as well as having built R&D centers in Shanghai, China and in Longtan, Taiwan at a former Qualcomm site.

Additionally, Apple has three development sites located in Israel: one in Ra'anana at a site that employs former employees of Texas Instruments, one in nearby Herzliya related to its 2011 acquisition of flash memory maker Anobit, and a third located further north in Haifa's Scientific Industries Center, adjacent to operations of Google, Intel, IBM, Microsoft and Yahoo.


Apple R&D site in Yokohama, Japan


Apple has R&D facilities under construction in Yokohama, Japan (above) at the site of a former Panasonic factory. That site is said to be intended to tap in to local talent specializing in materials science, vehicles and health science.

The company is also rumored to be moving into office space in Ottawa, Canada next to Blackberry's QNX subsidiary focused on automotive software solutions.

Apple in the USA



However, the majority of its product design and engineering work is done in the U.S.. Besides its Infinite Loop headquarters and Campus 2 project in Cupertino, California, and new facilities operating or planned in nearby Sunnyvale, Santa Clara and San Jose (including the former chip fab acquired from Maxim Integrated Products), Apple has a graphics chip development site at its Melbourne Design Center near Orlando, Florida, acquired alongside AuthenTec and Intrinsity and staffed with former AMD engineers.


Apple's Austin, Texas campus | Source: Austin Business Journal


Apple has also invested $300 million to build its Americas Operations Center (above) in Austin, Texas for 3,600 workers, and has reportedly leased office space in the Broadway Trade Center in Downtown Los Angeles, California.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 26
    I know that area well. Good choice. There's a lot of terrific human capital they can access there. 
    levicornchip
  • Reply 2 of 26
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,399member
    $25m is chump-change compared to the amount of money Apple will make in India.
  • Reply 3 of 26
    sflocal said:
    $25m is chump-change compared to the amount of money Apple will make in India.
    Not to be outdone, Google's heap-big-chief, Sundar Pichai, announced they will spend $160 million in India and donate two barges of shipping containers for use as local housing. Also Sundar Pichai reportedly sent a telegram to Tim Cook that read, "...and your little dog too!"
  • Reply 4 of 26
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    Apple following in Samsung's footsteps.  Samsung's largest overseas research and development center is located in Bangalore, which they started in 1995 and which has 4,500 employees.  They have a further two research centres in India and overall they employ 10,000 people.  Samsung's Bada OS was developed in Bangalore and I suspect Tizen probably was too.  Nokia used to employ a lot of engineers there too.
  • Reply 5 of 26
    brucemcbrucemc Posts: 1,499member
    No doubt making investments in the local industry is a key part to getting approval for Apple Stores. Well worth it to really focus on growing the Indian market, which is the largest single untapped market for Apple (though lots of smaller developing markets left to go of course). 
    Rayz2016
  • Reply 6 of 26
    cnocbui said:
    Apple following in Samsung's footsteps.  Samsung's largest overseas research and development center is located in Bangalore, which they started in 1995 and which has 4,500 employees.  They have a further two research centres in India and overall they employ 10,000 people.  Samsung's Bada OS was developed in Bangalore and I suspect Tizen probably was too.  Nokia used to employ a lot of engineers there too.
    Samsung and more generally, Android, have a pretty solid presence in India among the well-off currently. I had initially thought that it might be the cheap, low-end stuff, but not anymore. High-end smartphone adoption could be at a major inflection point, and Apple will have a tougher slog than it thinks. It's not a gimme. 

    That said, China was similar, and Apple succeeded dramatically there. Some of that surely had to do with having large local presence. 
    cnocbui
  • Reply 7 of 26
    Interesting that both Microsoft and Google are now run by brilliant Indian software engineers, however in at least Microsoft's case they still can't shake their legacy of poorly designed and conceived dreck.
  • Reply 8 of 26
    There goes DED with another biased attack article on competitors full of misinformation, again. /s
    cornchip
  • Reply 9 of 26
    cnocbui said:
    Apple following in Samsung's footsteps.  Samsung's largest overseas research and development center is located in Bangalore, which they started in 1995 and which has 4,500 employees.  They have a further two research centres in India and overall they employ 10,000 people.  Samsung's Bada OS was developed in Bangalore and I suspect Tizen probably was too.  Nokia used to employ a lot of engineers there too.
    Samsung and more generally, Android, have a pretty solid presence in India among the well-off currently. I had initially thought that it might be the cheap, low-end stuff, but not anymore. High-end smartphone adoption could be at a major inflection point, and Apple will have a tougher slog than it thinks. It's not a gimme. 

    That said, China was similar, and Apple succeeded dramatically there. Some of that surely had to do with having large local presence. 
    I think you nailed it with that last sentence. I just counted 29 Apple Stores in China on Apples website, and they are building more constantly.

    It seems like getting Stores open as quickly as possible in India will be a major factor.
  • Reply 10 of 26
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    techlover said:
    I think you nailed it with that last sentence. I just counted 29 Apple Stores in China on Apples website, and they are building more constantly.

    It seems like getting Stores open as quickly as possible in India will be a major factor.
    They probably won't make much of a difference at all.
  • Reply 11 of 26
    cnocbui said:
    techlover said:
    I think you nailed it with that last sentence. I just counted 29 Apple Stores in China on Apples website, and they are building more constantly.

    It seems like getting Stores open as quickly as possible in India will be a major factor.
    They probably won't make much of a difference at all.
    Yeah, and Apple continues to open them because...? For browsing?

    C'mon, you couldn't be more wrong. 
    nolamacguy
  • Reply 12 of 26
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    cnocbui said:
    They probably won't make much of a difference at all.
    Yeah, and Apple continues to open them because...? For browsing?

    C'mon, you couldn't be more wrong. 
    Sorry, I was assuming price was the barrier, not availability.  Obviously if availability has been the issue, then opening stores will address that and sales will take off.  My bad.
  • Reply 13 of 26
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,556member
    cnocbui said:
    Apple following in Samsung's footsteps.  Samsung's largest overseas research and development center is located in Bangalore, which they started in 1995 and which has 4,500 employees.  They have a further two research centres in India and overall they employ 10,000 people.  Samsung's Bada OS was developed in Bangalore and I suspect Tizen probably was too.  Nokia used to employ a lot of engineers there too.

    Don't think anyone said that Apple was the first company to open an office in a foreign country, but if pointing out that Samsung did it first makes you happy then by all means knock yourself out.
    cornchipentropysnolamacguy
  • Reply 14 of 26
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,556member

    cnocbui said:
    They probably won't make much of a difference at all.
    Yeah, and Apple continues to open them because...? For browsing?

    C'mon, you couldn't be more wrong. 
    And you are absolutely right.

    A large network of stores means that folk can pick up stuff they buy online, and can take stuff back for repairs. 

    I also think that at some point in the future, Apple will need it's own network; possibly a virtual one to begin with, augmented by Wifi provided by a network. They can start the network by putting the necessary equipment in the Apple stores. 

    And that's not forgetting the other stuff they do like the Genius Bar and the training courses. 
    edited February 2016
  • Reply 15 of 26
    There goes DED with another biased attack article on competitors full of misinformation, again. /s
    This is why some of his articles are so frustrating. 
    Thus one is short, quite concise and an enjoyable read without an extra thousand words or a foaming at the mouth diatribe against Android. 
  • Reply 16 of 26
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    Rayz2016 said:
    cnocbui said:
    Apple following in Samsung's footsteps.  Samsung's largest overseas research and development center is located in Bangalore, which they started in 1995 and which has 4,500 employees.  They have a further two research centres in India and overall they employ 10,000 people.  Samsung's Bada OS was developed in Bangalore and I suspect Tizen probably was too.  Nokia used to employ a lot of engineers there too.

    Don't think anyone said that Apple was the first company to open an office in a foreign country, but if pointing out that Samsung did it first makes you happy then by all means knock yourself out.
    Just thought I would add the information as for some reason DED failed to mention it.  The article mentioned Microsoft and Google also - should DED have refrained from mentioning those, and if not, why do you seem so agitated?
    edited February 2016
  • Reply 17 of 26
    cnocbui said:
    Apple following in Samsung's footsteps.  Samsung's largest overseas research and development center is located in Bangalore, which they started in 1995 and which has 4,500 employees.  They have a further two research centres in India and overall they employ 10,000 people.  Samsung's Bada OS was developed in Bangalore and I suspect Tizen probably was too.  Nokia used to employ a lot of engineers there too.
    It weakens your argument to surface facts about Bada and Tizen, both of which have been major disappointing flops.
    cornchipnolamacguy
  • Reply 18 of 26
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    Interesting that both Microsoft and Google are now run by brilliant Indian software engineers, however in at least Microsoft's case they still can't shake their legacy of poorly designed and conceived dreck.

    Indian software engineers can produce dreck like the rest of us, dreck is the universal language of computing ;-). Yes, I've been around a lot, most being "non dreck" producers.
  • Reply 19 of 26
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    cnocbui said:
    Apple following in Samsung's footsteps.  Samsung's largest overseas research and development center is located in Bangalore, which they started in 1995 and which has 4,500 employees.  They have a further two research centres in India and overall they employ 10,000 people.  Samsung's Bada OS was developed in Bangalore and I suspect Tizen probably was too.  Nokia used to employ a lot of engineers there too.
    Samsung and more generally, Android, have a pretty solid presence in India among the well-off currently. I had initially thought that it might be the cheap, low-end stuff, but not anymore. High-end smartphone adoption could be at a major inflection point, and Apple will have a tougher slog than it thinks. It's not a gimme. 

    That said, China was similar, and Apple succeeded dramatically there. Some of that surely had to do with having large local presence. 
    What differentiates Apple is ecosystem and service (they're linked). Apple doesn't just sell a product, it sells also everything that goes with it. That's why stores have been so crucial to its resurgence unlike Microsoft were its just a place to peddle products..
  • Reply 20 of 26
    Good.
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