Apple gets green light to add 1,000 jobs at Irish headquarters

Posted:
in General Discussion
More than nine months after Apple first announced plans to expand its European headquarters in Cork, Ireland, and amid an EU probe into questionable tax practices, the company was recently granted approval to add 1,000 people to its workforce over the next 18 months.


Apple's headquarters in Cork, Ireland, via Flickr user Sigalakos.


To accommodate the influx of new hires, which will bring the total employee head count to more than 6,000, Apple has plans to build a four-story office block projected for completion next year, The Irish Times reports.

In addition to the office building, Apple will add 752 new parking spaces to existing facilities. The construction effort is expected to employ some 200 people, Apple said.

Local residents of Hollyhill objected to the project, saying they would be "practically living in an industrial estate" if Apple was granted permission to expand. Ireland planning board An Bord Plean?la ultimately determined the new offices and construction were within the constraints of the Cork City Development Plan and would have no noticeable impact on the surrounding community.

Rumors of a major Cork expansion arrived in May 2015. At the time, reports indicated that Apple was looking to improve facilities at its headquarters to meet growing international demand for its products. Apple CEO Tim Cook later confirmed the company would hire 1,000 people to fill positions in manufacturing, customer care, finance and global supply chain management.

Apple will be building as European Union antitrust watchdog, the European Commission, probes the firm's tax strategy, which employs the so-called "Double Irish" provision to sidestep billions of dollars in taxes. Because the Cork facility plays a central role in Apple's version of the popular accounting scheme, the commission is investigating whether Ireland gave the company preferential treatment in a bid to spur job creation and economic growth. A judgment is due in September.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 24
    latifbplatifbp Posts: 544member
    Ok Euros. You still not really value or appreciate now 7000 jobs in Ireland? Still want to degrade and devalue what Apple is contributing to Ireland?
    badmonk
  • Reply 2 of 24
    512ke512ke Posts: 767member
    Apple should get out of Ireland in my personal opinion. The deals they are making with the government there are not reliable over time. 
    latifbpSpamSandwich
  • Reply 3 of 24
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 8,360member
    Apple should wait and see what the results of the crooked EU probe are before committing to anything.

    You can't trust those people. 
    latifbpSpamSandwich
  • Reply 4 of 24
    jfc1138jfc1138 Posts: 3,090member
    512ke said:
    Apple should get out of Ireland in my personal opinion. The deals they are making with the government there are not reliable over time. 
    Well since they'll want to continue doing business in the EU Ireland may be the friendliest place. But, yes, the extra deals seem too subject to the whim of people in Belgium for long term reliance. And that retroactive twist sure bites. 
    edited August 2016 latifbph2p
  • Reply 5 of 24
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    latifbp said:
    Ok Euros. You still not really value or appreciate now 7000 jobs in Ireland? Still want to degrade and devalue what Apple is contributing to Ireland?
    Let me explain how this works as simply as I can:   All the foreign companies that have a presence in Ireland, are here because they see an advantage to themselves, not because they are doing Ireland a favour out of the goodness of the hearts that none of them have.

    For sure they are all most welcome and Ireland would indeed be more stuffed than it is without the employment they provide, but this is not a one-way street.  There is also benefit for the companies, otherwise they wouldn't be here.

    What is it with this DEDesque article that initially gives the impression Apple needed permission from someone to expand it's workforce?  It's always got to be made out that the entire world is against Apple but that they miraculously prevail against all the evil forces opposing them.  Apple applied for planning permission to build more buildings and it was given approval.  That isn't close to being the same thing as implying Apple needed permission to employ more people.
    edited August 2016 singularitybadmonk
  • Reply 6 of 24
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    512ke said:
    Apple should get out of Ireland in my personal opinion. The deals they are making with the government there are not reliable over time. 


    There you go, take your pick and write to Tim with your suggestion.  You might want to skip the UK.  If one of your criteria is fluency in English, your choices might be a bit limited.  How's Tim's Slovakian?
    singularityadrayvennostrathomash2pspacerays
  • Reply 7 of 24
    cnocbui said:
    latifbp said:
    Ok Euros. You still not really value or appreciate now 7000 jobs in Ireland? Still want to degrade and devalue what Apple is contributing to Ireland?
    Let me explain how this works as simply as I can:   All the foreign companies that have a presence in Ireland, are here because they see an advantage to themselves, not because they are doing Ireland a favour out of the goodness of the hearts that none of them have.

    For sure they are all most welcome and Ireland would indeed be more stuffed than it is without the employment they provide, but this is not a one-way street.  There is also benefit for the companies, otherwise they wouldn't be here.
    Duh, all of us dummies thought Apple was there just as a humanitarian gesture. No. Some of us question whether Apple is actually getting the benefit they sought. If the deals they made are going to be broken by the EU, if Apple is treated like a tax cheat and made to pay billions they did not owe, then one may reasonably question whether their presence in Ireland makes sense. 
    edited August 2016 ai46latifbp
  • Reply 8 of 24
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    williamh said:
    cnocbui said:
    latifbp said:
    Ok Euros. You still not really value or appreciate now 7000 jobs in Ireland? Still want to degrade and devalue what Apple is contributing to Ireland?
    Let me explain how this works as simply as I can:   All the foreign companies that have a presence in Ireland, are here because they see an advantage to themselves, not because they are doing Ireland a favour out of the goodness of the hearts that none of them have.

    For sure they are all most welcome and Ireland would indeed be more stuffed than it is without the employment they provide, but this is not a one-way street.  There is also benefit for the companies, otherwise they wouldn't be here.
    Duh, all of us dummies thought Apple was there just as a humanitarian gesture. No. Some of us question whether Apple is actually getting the benefit they sought. If the deals they made are going to be broken by the EU, if Apple is treated like a tax cheat and made to pay billions they did not owe, then one may reasonably question whether their presence in Ireland makes sense. 
    It appears Apple and the Irish government did a deal that was in breach of EU law.  What would happen in the US if a state did a deal with a company and  told them they could ignore a federal law and dump toxic waste, or something similar?   Would the federal government say; 'you guys did a deal and now thousands of US citizens are dying from cancer from polluted groundwater, no sweat, that's cool since you did a deal.'?  Is that how it would go down?
    edited August 2016 singularityh2p
  • Reply 9 of 24
    irelandireland Posts: 17,223member
    I don't know if Apple dodged taxes, but I know separately I really dislike what goes on in Brussels. 
    h2platifbp
  • Reply 10 of 24
    cnocbui said:
    williamh said:
    Duh, all of us dummies thought Apple was there just as a humanitarian gesture. No. Some of us question whether Apple is actually getting the benefit they sought. If the deals they made are going to be broken by the EU, if Apple is treated like a tax cheat and made to pay billions they did not owe, then one may reasonably question whether their presence in Ireland makes sense. 
    It appears Apple and the Irish government did a deal that was in breach of EU law.  What would happen in the US if a state did a deal with a company and  told them they could ignore a federal law and dump toxic waste, or something similar?   Would the federal government say; 'you guys did a deal and now thousands of US citizens are dying from cancer from polluted groundwater, no sweat, that's cool since you did a deal.'?  Is that how it would go down?
    No, They didn't do an illegal deal.. EU is contending it's illegal NOW because laws were 'unfair' and are retro-actively saying they can punish companies for using the law as it stands. This basically tells me you can't even trust following the existing laws, because they will just say they didn't like them and backstab you anyway.

    Research a little more, their contention is VERY thin and largely Apple did, in-fact, follow the law. It's not like EU will see any of that money, It's all Taxes that goto Ireland ANYWAY. They just want to push Apple out of Ireland and get Apples business in other countries in the EU.

    The EU has been doing regular audits of Apple since the 1990's and approved their tax methods every single time. Thats whats galling. IMO, you don't like your laws, change them, fine.. Whatever they get changed to companies like Apple will follow them. But this is more of a linching to 'drive' companies like Apple OUT of Ireland because Germany and a few other countries what them to move their instead.

    How do you do that, you make them villains, and drum up tax evasion ..
    edited August 2016 nostrathomaslatifbp
  • Reply 11 of 24
    cnocbui said:
    williamh said:
    cnocbui said:
    latifbp said:
    Ok Euros. You still not really value or appreciate now 7000 jobs in Ireland? Still want to degrade and devalue what Apple is contributing to Ireland?
    Let me explain how this works as simply as I can:   All the foreign companies that have a presence in Ireland, are here because they see an advantage to themselves, not because they are doing Ireland a favour out of the goodness of the hearts that none of them have.

    For sure they are all most welcome and Ireland would indeed be more stuffed than it is without the employment they provide, but this is not a one-way street.  There is also benefit for the companies, otherwise they wouldn't be here.
    Duh, all of us dummies thought Apple was there just as a humanitarian gesture. No. Some of us question whether Apple is actually getting the benefit they sought. If the deals they made are going to be broken by the EU, if Apple is treated like a tax cheat and made to pay billions they did not owe, then one may reasonably question whether their presence in Ireland makes sense. 
    It appears Apple and the Irish government did a deal that was in breach of EU law.  What would happen in the US if a state did a deal with a company and  told them they could ignore a federal law and dump toxic waste, or something similar?   Would the federal government say; 'you guys did a deal and now thousands of US citizens are dying from cancer from polluted groundwater, no sweat, that's cool since you did a deal.'?  Is that how it would go down?
    Firstly, I agree with Adraven, Apple didn't do an illegal deal. Apple has money, the EU wants money. That's all there is.  Your point is irrelevant but I do like your hyperbolic analogy.

    The point is and remains even if the EU is correct about the taxes:  If Apple went into Ireland because they expected certain benefits and they're not getting them, they ought to consider whether expanding their presence in Ireland (or remaining at all) still makes sense.  

    I can make analogies too.

    It's like you accepted a job with a company for a nice salary and then several years later a union says you have to pay a large chunk of your salary for the past years to the union because the company violated a union provision in offering you too much.  Maybe the union is correct and maybe they're not, but you'd have to consider whether or not to remain given the new circumstances.
    edited August 2016 quinneylatifbph2p
  • Reply 12 of 24
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    Apple and the Irish government did have an arrangement that was in breach of EU regulations concerning unfair competition.  It will be found to be illegal state aid.  There will be a finding and the Irish government will be required to collect the taxes Apple should have paid without the arrangement.  That sum will run into the billions, not millions.  End of.

    Why is it that so many people can not seem to grasp what the issue actually is and seem completely obsessed that this is about taxation, when it isn't?
    edited August 2016 singularity
  • Reply 13 of 24
    cnocbuicnocbui Posts: 3,613member
    Take your meds.
    singularity
  • Reply 14 of 24
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 3,797member
    cnocbui said:
    Apple and the Irish government did have an arrangement that was in breach of EU regulations concerning unfair competition.  It will be found to be illegal state aid.  There will be a finding and the Irish government will be required to collect the taxes Apple should have paid without the arrangement.  That sum will run into the billions, not millions.  End of.

    Why is it that so many people can not seem to grasp what the issue actually is and seem completely obsessed that this is about taxation, when it isn't?
    Since the result of the investigation is not due until next month, and since Ireland will most probably appeal (because a loss would expose other large multinationals same the same deal) then aren't we gleefully rubbing our hands together a little too early?

    The EU has to show that Ireland gave this deal to Apple and no one else. 

    latifbp
  • Reply 15 of 24
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 3,797member

    sog35 said:
    cnocbui said:
    Apple and the Irish government did have an arrangement that was in breach of EU regulations concerning unfair competition.  It will be found to be illegal state aid.  There will be a finding and the Irish government will be required to collect the taxes Apple should have paid without the arrangement.  That sum will run into the billions, not millions.  End of.

    Why is it that so many people can not seem to grasp what the issue actually is and seem completely obsessed that this is about taxation, when it isn't?
    Prove that Apple broke EU regulations.

    Prove that other companies could not have done EXACTLY what Apple had done. Apple did not break a single Irish Tax law, so other companies could have done the exact same thing.

    And if what Apple/Ireland did was illegal why didn't the EU say anything for OVER A DECADE! Its flat out ridiculous.  Don't give me this crap that the EU did not know what Apple was doing. Apple is Ireland's #1 net profit corporation. So don't tell me Apple just slipped through the cracks. 

    Trust me if the EU says Apple owes BILLIONS its going to mean war.

    You will see THOUSANDS of American companies leave the EU. 
    You will see HUNDREDS of THOUSANDS of jobs leave the EU.
    You will see HUNDREDS of BILLIONS in investment leave the EU.

    If the EU can retroactively change tax rules at a whim, no US company will want to do anything in such a POS place.

    And even if the EU decides Apple owes Billions you can bet your ass Apple will appeal this decision for YEARS.
    The EU will never get their billions from Apple and they will lose every single US company also.

    The EU is not retroactively changing a tax rule. It has always been illegal to offer preferential tax treatment to one company over another. If this is the case then the EU can ask that Ireland demand the money from Apple. 

    However, the EU has to prove that the Ireland has not given the same deal to other multinationals. Ireland says this is the same deal everyone gets. 

    singularity
  • Reply 16 of 24
    Greenlight...Ireland...green...Ireland...ah, I get it!
  • Reply 17 of 24
    latifbplatifbp Posts: 544member
    cnocbui said:
    latifbp said:
    Ok Euros. You still not really value or appreciate now 7000 jobs in Ireland? Still want to degrade and devalue what Apple is contributing to Ireland?
    Let me explain how this works as simply as I can:   All the foreign companies that have a presence in Ireland, are here because they see an advantage to themselves, not because they are doing Ireland a favour out of the goodness of the hearts that none of them have.

    For sure they are all most welcome and Ireland would indeed be more stuffed than it is without the employment they provide, but this is not a one-way street.  There is also benefit for the companies, otherwise they wouldn't be here.

    What is it with this DEDesque article that initially gives the impression Apple needed permission from someone to expand it's workforce?  It's always got to be made out that the entire world is against Apple but that they miraculously prevail against all the evil forces opposing them.  Apple applied for planning permission to build more buildings and it was given approval.  That isn't close to being the same thing as implying Apple needed permission to employ more people.
    It's mutual... Business is done on the basis of something for something, not something for nothing. Apple benefits. Ireland benefits. All I see you anti-corporate Euros on here doing is minimizing and degrading Apple's presence in Ireland. 6000 jobs is nothing to shake a stick at. Adding another thousand is even better. Apple strives to profit, no doubt, but they also strive to do good wherever they go. Tell me another company whose CEO sat down in a face to face meeting with environmentalists in China.
    edited August 2016 h2p
  • Reply 18 of 24
    latifbplatifbp Posts: 544member
    Rayz2016 said:

    sog35 said:
    cnocbui said:
    Apple and the Irish government did have an arrangement that was in breach of EU regulations concerning unfair competition.  It will be found to be illegal state aid.  There will be a finding and the Irish government will be required to collect the taxes Apple should have paid without the arrangement.  That sum will run into the billions, not millions.  End of.

    Why is it that so many people can not seem to grasp what the issue actually is and seem completely obsessed that this is about taxation, when it isn't?
    Prove that Apple broke EU regulations.

    Prove that other companies could not have done EXACTLY what Apple had done. Apple did not break a single Irish Tax law, so other companies could have done the exact same thing.

    And if what Apple/Ireland did was illegal why didn't the EU say anything for OVER A DECADE! Its flat out ridiculous.  Don't give me this crap that the EU did not know what Apple was doing. Apple is Ireland's #1 net profit corporation. So don't tell me Apple just slipped through the cracks. 

    Trust me if the EU says Apple owes BILLIONS its going to mean war.

    You will see THOUSANDS of American companies leave the EU. 
    You will see HUNDREDS of THOUSANDS of jobs leave the EU.
    You will see HUNDREDS of BILLIONS in investment leave the EU.

    If the EU can retroactively change tax rules at a whim, no US company will want to do anything in such a POS place.

    And even if the EU decides Apple owes Billions you can bet your ass Apple will appeal this decision for YEARS.
    The EU will never get their billions from Apple and they will lose every single US company also.

    The EU is not retroactively changing a tax rule. It has always been illegal to offer preferential tax treatment to one company over another. If this is the case then the EU can ask that Ireland demand the money from Apple. 

    However, the EU has to prove that the Ireland has not given the same deal to other multinationals. Ireland says this is the same deal everyone gets. 

    The U.S. and the EU have been negotiating how to revise the corporate tax system to fit into the new global economy we're entering. This, as Lew stated, threatens to undermine the very revision that our two economic powers have been hashing out for some time. To take this action at this late hour shows contempt by the EU for agreements we have been trying to finalize for a while now. It's just an asshole move. Still nobody can identify one European company that was harmed by this tax deal, or one Euro company whose ability to compete was undermined due to this arrangement... And as Sog pointed out no proof other companies could not get such a deal.
    h2p
  • Reply 19 of 24
    singularitysingularity Posts: 1,328member
    latifbp said:
    Rayz2016 said:


    The EU is not retroactively changing a tax rule. It has always been illegal to offer preferential tax treatment to one company over another. If this is the case then the EU can ask that Ireland demand the money from Apple. 

    However, the EU has to prove that the Ireland has not given the same deal to other multinationals. Ireland says this is the same deal everyone gets. 

    The U.S. and the EU have been negotiating how to revise the corporate tax system to fit into the new global economy we're entering. This, as Lew stated, threatens to undermine the very revision that our two economic powers have been hashing out for some time. To take this action at this late hour shows contempt by the EU for agreements we have been trying to finalize for a while now. It's just an asshole move. Still nobody can identify one European company that was harmed by this tax deal, or one Euro company whose ability to compete was undermined due to this arrangement... And as Sog pointed out no proof other companies could not get such a deal.
    How would anyone on a tech forum know if any company suffered? People can theorise but no one has proof unless they have a source of confidential financial information. But that is a false herring as it doesn't matter if any company suffered or not if the rules were broken.
  • Reply 20 of 24
    latifbplatifbp Posts: 544member
    latifbp said:
    Rayz2016 said:


    The EU is not retroactively changing a tax rule. It has always been illegal to offer preferential tax treatment to one company over another. If this is the case then the EU can ask that Ireland demand the money from Apple. 

    However, the EU has to prove that the Ireland has not given the same deal to other multinationals. Ireland says this is the same deal everyone gets. 

    The U.S. and the EU have been negotiating how to revise the corporate tax system to fit into the new global economy we're entering. This, as Lew stated, threatens to undermine the very revision that our two economic powers have been hashing out for some time. To take this action at this late hour shows contempt by the EU for agreements we have been trying to finalize for a while now. It's just an asshole move. Still nobody can identify one European company that was harmed by this tax deal, or one Euro company whose ability to compete was undermined due to this arrangement... And as Sog pointed out no proof other companies could not get such a deal.
    How would anyone on a tech forum know if any company suffered? People can theorise but no one has proof unless they have a source of confidential financial information. But that is a false herring as it doesn't matter if any company suffered or not if the rules were broken.
    So you want to cast aspersions that Apple engaged in anti-competitive behavior yet have zero proof that anybody suffered any damages. Don't you think other companies would have been crying foul? Or they suffered severe harm yet just kept to themselves? WTF?!
    h2p
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