Samsung Galaxy fire blamed in evacuation of Southwest flight

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Comments

  • Reply 61 of 101
    gilly33gilly33 Posts: 286member
    lkrupp said:
    We recently read about a battery test that showed the iPhone had the worst battery life. Of course many real world users disputed that but it’s starting to look like the race to get better battery life caused Samsung to cut corners, push engineering over the edge. Will this be the issue that makes Samsung Jump The Shark? 
    Some reports suggest they were racing to beat Apple October reveal of iPhone 7. They are so bent on beating Apple they released a device not ready for the public. Shame on them. 
    calilolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 62 of 101
    calicali Posts: 3,495member
    tzeshan said:
    sog35 said:
    This is friken RIDICULOUS.

    All Samsung phones need to be confiscated from all flights. PERIOD.

    They need to be collected and stored in an air tight/fire proof safe for the entire flight.


    These phones are as dangerous as dynamite. 
    Why the HELL is the govt not doing anything?
    Many people don't know Android phones are much superior to iPhones.  Google Android phones are capable of doing multi-tasking even in the background.  They think if Android phones are not in use then there is no danger of overheating.  Apparently Samsung proved the government and the media are idiots.  
    Many people don't know Twist-Up is superior to 7-Up, Dr. Salt is superior to Dr. Pepper, Froot Hoops is superior to Froot Loops and fools gold is superior to gold.
    edited October 2016 lolliverSpamSandwich
  • Reply 63 of 101
    brakkenbrakken Posts: 687member
    No, Mr Galaxy, I expect you to.... DIE!!!!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 64 of 101
    tzeshantzeshan Posts: 2,008member
    tzeshan said:
    sog35 said:
    This is friken RIDICULOUS.

    All Samsung phones need to be confiscated from all flights. PERIOD.

    They need to be collected and stored in an air tight/fire proof safe for the entire flight.


    These phones are as dangerous as dynamite. 
    Why the HELL is the govt not doing anything?
    Many people don't know Android phones are much superior to iPhones.  Google Android phones are capable of doing multi-tasking even in the background.  They think if Android phones are not in use then there is no danger of overheating.  Apparently Samsung proved the government and the media are idiots.  
    Android is NOT superior to iOS even with background multi tasking. And the phone in question was powered off. If android is actually running in the background when a phone is powered down, then I will admit that android is truly superior, in that it can run without a power source. And if the OS is still running utilizing the battery when a phone is powered down, it is a massive OS design flaw. It would mean the only way really to shut phone down would be to fully exhaust the battery. So much for saving the battery on an Android phone when it is powered down. The OS is still running anyway and performing multiple tasks draining the battery so that when it is powered up, half the battery life is gone. 

    Fast charging lithium batteries is fraught with risk anyhow. It was even a problem for Boeing's 787.  

    Android much superior to iOS. LOL. That's a good one. 
    I am just sarcastic .  Because I heard many Fandroids bragging this.  This guy could be just turning off his Note 7.  Power off is not the same as shut off.  
    palomine
  • Reply 65 of 101
    boredumb said:
    NY1822 said:
    Other articles online are stating this was a replacement phone, deemed to be safe by Samsung.
    There are plenty of perfectly safe replacement phones...
    at the Apple Store.

    He agrees.

    He has already replaced it with an iPhone 7.

    Replacement Samsung Galaxy Note 7 phone catches fire on Southwest plane
    edited October 2016 SpamSandwich
  • Reply 66 of 101
    lolliverlolliver Posts: 351member
    matrix077 said:
    boredumb said:
    NY1822 said:
    Other articles online are stating this was a replacement phone, deemed to be safe by Samsung.
    There are plenty of perfectly safe replacement phones...
    at the Apple Store.

    He agrees.

    He has already replaced it with an iPhone 7.

    Replacement Samsung Galaxy Note 7 phone catches fire on Southwest plane
    Seems it takes something pretty drastic like this to get people to swap from such terrible Samsung phones. Had someone at work today complaining that their Samsung phone is now useless after having it about a year. When I said 1-2 years for a phone like that isn't bad their response was "Yeah but I had my iPhone 4 for over 3 years when I got the Samsung and there was still nothing wrong with the iPhone". When I pointed out that was because it was made by Apple and not Samsung they got angry and defensive. They are going to go buy themselves a new Samsung.... :(
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 67 of 101
    lolliver said:
    Had someone at work today complaining that their Samsung phone is now useless after having it about a year. When I said 1-2 years for a phone like that isn't bad their response was "Yeah but I had my iPhone 4 for over 3 years when I got the Samsung and there was still nothing wrong with the iPhone". When I pointed out that was because it was made by Apple and not Samsung they got angry and defensive. They are going to go buy themselves a new Samsung.... :( 

    Ha. Like my ex-girlfriend who always complained iPhone was too expensive and she will never use one but in 4 years she replaced her Galaxy phone 3 times. 3 phones bought new. In that period my wife iPhone 4 was still going strong. (she's even reluctant to replace it with iPhone 6 eventually) 
    pscooter63lollivercaliwatto_cobrakudu
  • Reply 68 of 101
    metrixmetrix Posts: 253member
    mpirate said:
    If confirmed as a REPLACEMENT Note 7, which appears to be the case, this could be REAL bad for Samsung. 
    I predicted this on day 1 of recall!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 69 of 101
    Jes Sayin'...
    watto_cobraSpamSandwichkudu
  • Reply 70 of 101
    jfc1138jfc1138 Posts: 3,090member
    tzeshan said:
    tzeshan said:
    sog35 said:
    This is friken RIDICULOUS.

    All Samsung phones need to be confiscated from all flights. PERIOD.

    They need to be collected and stored in an air tight/fire proof safe for the entire flight.


    These phones are as dangerous as dynamite. 
    Why the HELL is the govt not doing anything?
    Many people don't know Android phones are much superior to iPhones.  Google Android phones are capable of doing multi-tasking even in the background.  They think if Android phones are not in use then there is no danger of overheating.  Apparently Samsung proved the government and the media are idiots.  
    Android is NOT superior to iOS even with background multi tasking. And the phone in question was powered off. If android is actually running in the background when a phone is powered down, then I will admit that android is truly superior, in that it can run without a power source. And if the OS is still running utilizing the battery when a phone is powered down, it is a massive OS design flaw. It would mean the only way really to shut phone down would be to fully exhaust the battery. So much for saving the battery on an Android phone when it is powered down. The OS is still running anyway and performing multiple tasks draining the battery so that when it is powered up, half the battery life is gone. 

    Fast charging lithium batteries is fraught with risk anyhow. It was even a problem for Boeing's 787.  

    Android much superior to iOS. LOL. That's a good one. 
    I am just sarcastic .  Because I heard many Fandroids bragging this.  This guy could be just turning off his Note 7.  Power off is not the same as shut off.  
    Now there's something that should be repeated on the planes for emphasis! Power off is NOT the same as just turning off the screen. 
    edited October 2016 watto_cobrapscooter63netmage
  • Reply 71 of 101
    Soli said:
    NY1822 said:
    Other articles online are stating this was a replacement phone, deemed to be safe by Samsung.
    Even if it was, if the airline still had a stated policy of Galaxy phones being turned off and unplugged, then the passenger could be held responsible by Southwest and the other passengers.


    Exactly! I don't want to hear what Misty Whitaker has to say. I want to hear what the owner of the phone has to say. He/ She should be held responsible as far as this incident is concerned.

    Samsung should be held accountable on a wider scale later for the recall/ replacement based on whether this was a "safe" phone or not. Conflicting stories right now about this.

    edited October 2016
  • Reply 72 of 101
    A very serious, honest question, with absolutely no intention of casting any aspersions. I am merely bringing up the (vague) likelihood of pathological behavior. Is it foolish to worry, given all the attention this is getting, that someone -- and we know the extent of anti-Apple virulence out there -- might be tempted to tamper with an iPhone to make waves? If so, how could Apple possibly protect against something like that?


    1. Apple would ask for the device to see what went wrong and would find out that it was tampered with.

    2. It would still be a one-off incident. The person doing it would tamper 1 phone or even 2, but not so many that it would be as widespread as Samsung's Note problem. Not unless the person was the CEO of Samsung!

    watto_cobranetmage
  • Reply 73 of 101
    A very serious, honest question, with absolutely no intention of casting any aspersions. I am merely bringing up the (vague) likelihood of pathological behavior. Is it foolish to worry, given all the attention this is getting, that someone -- and we know the extent of anti-Apple virulence out there -- might be tempted to tamper with an iPhone to make waves? If so, how could Apple possibly protect against something like that?
    Sadly, the simple, but unacceptable, tradeoff would be to have a Govt. Regulation that bans taking any phone, computer or electronic device (regardless of brand) on any public transportation or viaduct (e.g., Golden Gate Bridge), public building, etc.

    edited October 2016
  • Reply 74 of 101
    A very serious, honest question, with absolutely no intention of casting any aspersions. I am merely bringing up the (vague) likelihood of pathological behavior. Is it foolish to worry, given all the attention this is getting, that someone -- and we know the extent of anti-Apple virulence out there -- might be tempted to tamper with an iPhone to make waves? If so, how could Apple possibly protect against something like that?


    1. Apple would ask for the device to see what went wrong and would find out that it was tampered with.

    2. It would still be a one-off incident. The person doing it would tamper 1 phone or even 2, but not so many that it would be as widespread as Samsung's Note problem. Not unless the person was the CEO of Samsung!


    1. If it exploded and brought down an airplane carrying thousands of gallons of jet fuel -- it might be a bit difficult to provide the device to Apple for analysis.

    2. Why would it be a one-off incident -- it could be the weapon of choice -- what if terrorists use a  phone instead of a belt full of explosives?

    The scary thing, on planes, is that you don't need any dynamite, etc. -- an exploding phone is just the fuse...


    edited October 2016
  • Reply 75 of 101
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 2,492member
    An onboard fire that injures of kills people will bring some draconian rules that will likely apply to a lot of electronics. Unlike the "no cell phone usage" that used to apply, you'd have an actual data point that the devices interfere with the safety of flight. There was exactly *zero* evidence that the cell phone radios could interfere with avionics, yet there were rules prohibiting their use for claimed "interference with the safety of the flight."

    The NTSB would like to prohibit all batteries on aircraft. In fact, shipments of LiOH batteries were classified as hazmat, yet you can have them in checked bags and onboard. Trace an onboard fire to a cell phone known to be defective, that was not in compliance with an airline policy...that then kills a few people... No computers, cell phone (or apple watches?) allowed on airlines even in checked bags? Yikes.

    Nevermind the liability to Samesung.
  • Reply 76 of 101
    eightzero said:
    An onboard fire that injures of kills people will bring some draconian rules that will likely apply to a lot of electronics. Unlike the "no cell phone usage" that used to apply, you'd have an actual data point that the devices interfere with the safety of flight. There was exactly *zero* evidence that the cell phone radios could interfere with avionics, yet there were rules prohibiting their use for claimed "interference with the safety of the flight."

    The NTSB would like to prohibit all batteries on aircraft. In fact, shipments of LiOH batteries were classified as hazmat, yet you can have them in checked bags and onboard. Trace an onboard fire to a cell phone known to be defective, that was not in compliance with an airline policy...that then kills a few people... No computers, cell phone (or apple watches?) allowed on airlines even in checked bags? Yikes.

    Nevermind the liability to Samesung.
    "No computers, cell phone (or apple watches?) allowed on airlines even in checked bags? Yikes."

    Yes, that certainly could happen -- not only for airlines, but for busses, trains, etc.

    But, there's an opportunity here...

  • Reply 77 of 101
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 31,412member
    eightzero said:
    An onboard fire that injures of kills people will bring some draconian rules that will likely apply to a lot of electronics. Unlike the "no cell phone usage" that used to apply, you'd have an actual data point that the devices interfere with the safety of flight. There was exactly *zero* evidence that the cell phone radios could interfere with avionics, yet there were rules prohibiting their use for claimed "interference with the safety of the flight."

    The NTSB would like to prohibit all batteries on aircraft. In fact, shipments of LiOH batteries were classified as hazmat, yet you can have them in checked bags and onboard. Trace an onboard fire to a cell phone known to be defective, that was not in compliance with an airline policy...that then kills a few people... No computers, cell phone (or apple watches?) allowed on airlines even in checked bags? Yikes.

    Nevermind the liability to Samesung.
    "No computers, cell phone (or apple watches?) allowed on airlines even in checked bags? Yikes."

    Yes, that certainly could happen -- not only for airlines, but for busses, trains, etc.

    But, there's an opportunity here...

    Bring on the handcranked computers, iPads, iPhones and Watches. :smile: 
    edited October 2016
  • Reply 78 of 101
    eightzero said:
    An onboard fire that injures of kills people will bring some draconian rules that will likely apply to a lot of electronics. Unlike the "no cell phone usage" that used to apply, you'd have an actual data point that the devices interfere with the safety of flight. There was exactly *zero* evidence that the cell phone radios could interfere with avionics, yet there were rules prohibiting their use for claimed "interference with the safety of the flight."

    The NTSB would like to prohibit all batteries on aircraft. In fact, shipments of LiOH batteries were classified as hazmat, yet you can have them in checked bags and onboard. Trace an onboard fire to a cell phone known to be defective, that was not in compliance with an airline policy...that then kills a few people... No computers, cell phone (or apple watches?) allowed on airlines even in checked bags? Yikes.

    Nevermind the liability to Samesung.
    "No computers, cell phone (or apple watches?) allowed on airlines even in checked bags? Yikes."

    Yes, that certainly could happen -- not only for airlines, but for busses, trains, etc.

    But, there's an opportunity here...

    Bring on the handcranked computers, iPads, iPhones and Watches. smile 
    Well...

    You have a long flight during which, you need to do some work on your iPad and/or stay in touch with your iPhone.

    But the FAA has banned bringing any tablet or phone on to any public airlines!

    What if the airlines provided  iPhones and iPads (pre-approved) for use during flight?

    When you make your flight reservation, you also reserve an iPad and/or iPhone.
    • before you leave for the airport, you prepare by synching your iDevices (encrypted, of course) to the airline's cloud (provided by Apple or IBM)
    • After passing security, you go to check-in -- where you are issued the iDevices you reserved (These iDevices have been secured, then never leave the secure area at either end of the flight)
    • While waiting to board, you can, optionally, synch the airline iDevices with your Cloud data  (full or partial)
    • or, you can access your Cloud data, as needed during the flight
    • any work you do is stored on the Cloud
    • on landing, you can wipe your synched apps/data from the iDevices
    • if you forget, no matter your apps/data are encrypted and will be removed by the airline in preparation for the next user

    Then on to the hotel, rinse and repeat.

    Not much more difficult than using a computer in a library.

    edited October 2016 kudu
  • Reply 79 of 101
    sog35 said:
    eightzero said:
    An onboard fire that injures of kills people will bring some draconian rules that will likely apply to a lot of electronics. Unlike the "no cell phone usage" that used to apply, you'd have an actual data point that the devices interfere with the safety of flight. There was exactly *zero* evidence that the cell phone radios could interfere with avionics, yet there were rules prohibiting their use for claimed "interference with the safety of the flight."

    The NTSB would like to prohibit all batteries on aircraft. In fact, shipments of LiOH batteries were classified as hazmat, yet you can have them in checked bags and onboard. Trace an onboard fire to a cell phone known to be defective, that was not in compliance with an airline policy...that then kills a few people... No computers, cell phone (or apple watches?) allowed on airlines even in checked bags? Yikes.

    Nevermind the liability to Samesung.
    "No computers, cell phone (or apple watches?) allowed on airlines even in checked bags? Yikes."

    Yes, that certainly could happen -- not only for airlines, but for busses, trains, etc.

    But, there's an opportunity here...

    not going to happen

    Most people who make these laws own iPhones
    All it takes is one incident (or attempt) to bring down a plane -- that can be traced to a modified electronic device brought on board by a customer.  Not just iPhones but any phone, tablet, computer or watch.

    Sadly, I suspect it will happen (or be attempted), and we will need to adjust our lives to prepare for the ensuing regulations.

  • Reply 80 of 101
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 2,492member
    sog35 said:
    eightzero said:
    An onboard fire that injures of kills people will bring some draconian rules that will likely apply to a lot of electronics. Unlike the "no cell phone usage" that used to apply, you'd have an actual data point that the devices interfere with the safety of flight. There was exactly *zero* evidence that the cell phone radios could interfere with avionics, yet there were rules prohibiting their use for claimed "interference with the safety of the flight."

    The NTSB would like to prohibit all batteries on aircraft. In fact, shipments of LiOH batteries were classified as hazmat, yet you can have them in checked bags and onboard. Trace an onboard fire to a cell phone known to be defective, that was not in compliance with an airline policy...that then kills a few people... No computers, cell phone (or apple watches?) allowed on airlines even in checked bags? Yikes.

    Nevermind the liability to Samesung.
    "No computers, cell phone (or apple watches?) allowed on airlines even in checked bags? Yikes."

    Yes, that certainly could happen -- not only for airlines, but for busses, trains, etc.

    But, there's an opportunity here...

    not going to happen

    Most people who make these laws own iPhones
    All it takes is one incident (or attempt) to bring down a plane -- that can be traced to a modified electronic device brought on board by a customer.  Not just iPhones but any phone, tablet, computer or watch.

    Sadly, I suspect it will happen (or be attempted), and we will need to adjust our lives to prepare for the ensuing regulations.

    Most people that make these laws fly on their own airplanes.

    Fun game: next time you see someone with a Note 7 on your flight, tell the flight crew there's a person on the flight with an explosive device. Tape the hilarity on your iPhone. Post video online. Profit.

    WTF with these signs in the airport that say "see something? Say something!" Sure sure.
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