Apple highlights US job creation on new webpage, touts 2M jobs across 50 states

Posted:
in General Discussion edited May 2017
Apple on Wednesday debuted a new webpage dedicated to highlighting the company's efforts toward generating jobs in the U.S., including the creation of two million jobs broken down by state, operating segment and more.




Apple's new Job Creation webpage is for the most part a basic informational web asset similar in spirit to other Apple.com pages touting the company's public projects. Like pages dedicated to the environment and privacy, the job creation site offers facts and figures about Apple's endeavors in the area.
The numbers tell the story. Apple is one of the biggest job creators in the United States, responsible for two million jobs in all 50 states. Last year, we spent over $50 billion with more than 9,000 U.S. suppliers and manufacturers. Since we launched the App Store in 2008, U.S. developers have earned over $16 billion in App Store sales worldwide. And we're just getting started.
There are now 80,000 Apple employees living and working in the U.S., up 1,500 percent since the launch of iMac in 1998, the company says. Apple notes its expansion is nationwide, with a 28 fold increase in jobs created outside of California since 2000. Broken down further, Apple says there are 29 cities with 250 or more employees and 44 states with at least one Apple Store (not counting the Washington, D.C., outlet).

An interactive section just below the large "2,000,000" number breaks down jobs by state. Each state gets a card bearing information on Apple's impact to their respective workforces. For example, the cards include numbers reflecting Apple employees, jobs related to the App Store ecosystem, number of Apple partner suppliers --with facility breakdowns -- and retail store count. In addition, Apple lists three apps created by people or companies from each state.

A separate section puts a face to hard numbers by profiling a few employees -- none from California -- who work at Apple's various facilities.




With the webpage, Apple is sending a clear message that the production and distribution of its devices, device components and manufacturing materials in some way affect domestic job creation. Hammering the point home, Apple notes some 450,000 jobs were created through U.S.-based suppliers, 90,000 of which were added within the past year.

Again, Apple inserts a special section profiling a few plant workers from companies like 3M, Caterpillar and Lapmaster.
We work with manufacturing locations in 38 states and more than 9,000 suppliers in all 50 states. And every one of our core products -- iPhone, iPad, Mac, Apple Watch, and Apple TV -- contains parts or materials from the U.S. or is made with equipment from U.S.-based suppliers.
The app economy is far and away the largest contributor to Apple's two million job figure, with 1.53 million jobs created and supported by the firm's various App Stores. The webpage illustrates developer distribution with a map graphic. Unsurprisingly, California sees the biggest benefit with 370,800 jobs created by Apple's app economy, while New York comes in second with 120,000 jobs.

Finally, a list of "key U.S. investment projects" is provided, including Apple's campus in Austin, Texas, a global command center in Mesa, Ariz., and data centers in Maiden, N.C., Prineville, Ore., and Reno, Nev.

The webpage launch follows Apple CEO Tim Cook's interview with CNBC's Jim Cramer. During the one-on-one talk, Cook spoke briefly about Apple's impact on the U.S. economy, especially as it pertains to jobs. He also announced a new $1 billion U.S. fund expected to generate jobs by investing in advanced manufacturing. The first target beneficiary will be announced later this month.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 26
    bloggerblogbloggerblog Posts: 2,004member
    How easy is it to get a job if you know how to develop iOS apps?
    Very easy!
  • Reply 2 of 26
    seafoxseafox Posts: 90member
    2 Million jobs! (Apple taking credit for 1.5M jobs they don't contribute to the payroll for)
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 3 of 26
    croprcropr Posts: 1,041member
    How easy is it to get a job if you know how to develop iOS apps?
    Very easy!
    How easy is it to have a profitable business developing iOS apps?  Sadly enough very hard as I has experienced.  An app costs on average 50K to develop.  With 30% cut Apple takes, this means 70K revenue to be break even.  90% of the apps on the app store don't reach that level.  I agree with 80K employees and the 450K suppliers jobs, but one has to take the 1.5M with a big bag of salt.
  • Reply 4 of 26
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 5,138member
    seafox said:
    2 Million jobs! (Apple taking credit for 1.5M jobs they don't contribute to the payroll for)
    Those opportunities were created by Apple. Its like car manufacturers don't directly pay for jobs for those that work in parts factories, but the opportunity was created by them so essentially, the car manufacturer created that job. If the car manufacturer decided to move away that job would also go away as it wouldn't be necessary anymore. 

    So yes, Apple created those jobs. If Apple shut down the AppStore today, millions of jobs would be lost. 
    dewmeradarthekatwatto_cobrabigmike
  • Reply 5 of 26
    rogifan_newrogifan_new Posts: 4,297member
    macxpress said:
    seafox said:
    2 Million jobs! (Apple taking credit for 1.5M jobs they don't contribute to the payroll for)
    Those opportunities were created by Apple. Its like car manufacturers don't directly pay for jobs for those that work in parts factories, but the opportunity was created by them so essentially, the car manufacturer created that job. If the car manufacturer decided to move away that job would also go away as it wouldn't be necessary anymore. 

    So yes, Apple created those jobs. If Apple shut down the AppStore today, millions of jobs would be lost. 
    2M people are making a living developing apps for iOS? And these people wouldn't have jobs if not for the iOS App Store? Seriously?!?
  • Reply 6 of 26
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 1,430member
    What? So the future of our economy is in high tech and not coal mining? 
    radarthekat
  • Reply 7 of 26
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 22,828member
    How easy is it to get a job if you know how to develop iOS apps?
    Very easy!
    How hard is it to make a living developing iOS apps? Apparently very hard. 

    (Same holds true for apps on other platforms so not dissing on Apple. It is what it is.)

    EDIT: This former Apple software engineer has a less-rosy take on the state of the little app developer.
    http://mattgemmell.com/damage/
    edited May 2017
  • Reply 8 of 26
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 5,138member
    macxpress said:
    seafox said:
    2 Million jobs! (Apple taking credit for 1.5M jobs they don't contribute to the payroll for)
    Those opportunities were created by Apple. Its like car manufacturers don't directly pay for jobs for those that work in parts factories, but the opportunity was created by them so essentially, the car manufacturer created that job. If the car manufacturer decided to move away that job would also go away as it wouldn't be necessary anymore. 

    So yes, Apple created those jobs. If Apple shut down the AppStore today, millions of jobs would be lost. 
    2M people are making a living developing apps for iOS? And these people wouldn't have jobs if not for the iOS App Store? Seriously?!?
    A job doesn't have to make a living...some people have more than 1 job. Think Rog...think! You've never heard of someone doing a side job to make a little extra money, or someone having more than 1 job? 
    edited May 2017 randominternetpersonStrangeDayswatto_cobraSpamSandwich
  • Reply 9 of 26
    dewmedewme Posts: 3,533member
    Good to see Apple trying to dispel some off the myths and FUD from the zero sum game players like politicians, trade unions, and corporate executives. Too many people get fixated on a notion that the job market is somehow a fixed sized pie. It's not. Apple (and other innovators) make the pie larger and create job opportunities that did not previously exist. Yes, they also reallocated jobs and relocated jobs within the pie. The real challenge then becomes whether to focus on creating a workforce that is adaptable to the dynamics of the real job market as it exists, which requires constant lifelong learning, retraining, and mobility - or to inject artificial and state control over the dynamics of the job market to match the entrenched desires of a workforce that cannot or will not adapt. Neither approach is universally right or wrong. It should be the responsibility of government and corporate leaders to develop a cooperative and hands-on strategy that recognizes workforce dynamics but is also empathetic to workers and families desiring a decent lifestyle. Doing nothing and letting the market influences alone drive the outcomes has never been an adequate or humane approach. Sustaining the fixed sized pie narrative, i.e., the pessimistic perspective, simply creates animosity and conflict between those most affected by workforce dynamics, the workers, while the leaders of government and industry get a free painless ride and live luxuriously and insulated well above the fray. 
    randominternetperson
  • Reply 10 of 26
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,336moderator
    macxpress said:
    seafox said:
    2 Million jobs! (Apple taking credit for 1.5M jobs they don't contribute to the payroll for)
    Those opportunities were created by Apple. Its like car manufacturers don't directly pay for jobs for those that work in parts factories, but the opportunity was created by them so essentially, the car manufacturer created that job. If the car manufacturer decided to move away that job would also go away as it wouldn't be necessary anymore. 

    So yes, Apple created those jobs. If Apple shut down the AppStore today, millions of jobs would be lost. 
    2M people are making a living developing apps for iOS? And these people wouldn't have jobs if not for the iOS App Store? Seriously?!?
    Wrong way to characterize this.  Nobody is claiming those folks wouldn't have jobs. It's merely a claim that Apple happens to be the proximate cause of those jobs.  That's credit worthy of claiming.  My company, which I started in 2000 with five other cofounders, just recently climbed to 100 employees.  Should I not have a sense of pride in the work I did to design the SaaS software upon which the company was founded?  I wouldn't claim that the talented employees wouldn't otherwise have work, but that fact doesn't take away from the fact that our collective innovation and efforts created 100 additional jobs for the economy.  
    edited May 2017 gatorguyStrangeDaysSpamSandwich
  • Reply 11 of 26
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 5,138member
    gatorguy said:
    How easy is it to get a job if you know how to develop iOS apps?
    Very easy!
    How hard is it to make a living developing iOS apps? Apparently very hard. 

    (Same holds true for apps on other platforms so not dissing on Apple. It is what it is.)

    EDIT: This former Apple software engineer has a less-rosy take on the state of the little app developer.
    http://mattgemmell.com/damage/
    Sorry, but this just seems like someone who is butt-hurt from Apple. I disagree with his thinking. Apple has created opportunities for developers, even small ones that have never been possible before. Apple doesn't set the price, the developer does. Where else can you build and app and have the opportunity to have it on millions of devices? If you're a small developer you're always going to be the small fish in a big pond, no matter what platform you're developing for. If I'm a two person team developing an app for Windows I'm a minnow in an ocean of large fish. 

    If a developer doesn't like what they're getting into with an app on the App Store, then they can always leave. Nobody forces them to keep going. Yes, they may be out some money, but its an investment on any platform. Nothing is a guarantee. 
  • Reply 12 of 26
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,336moderator
    cropr said:
    How easy is it to get a job if you know how to develop iOS apps?
    Very easy!
    How easy is it to have a profitable business developing iOS apps?  Sadly enough very hard as I has experienced.  An app costs on average 50K to develop.  With 30% cut Apple takes, this means 70K revenue to be break even.  90% of the apps on the app store don't reach that level.  I agree with 80K employees and the 450K suppliers jobs, but one has to take the 1.5M with a big bag of salt.
    I think there are many apps that are free, but are available in support of some profitable enterprise, like an app provided by your bank to securely access and manage accounts.  Those app developer jobs are justified by something other than any direct profit from selling an app.  And I'd imagine there are hundreds of thousands of such developers.  Including every iOS developer who works for Facebook, for example. 
    randominternetpersonStrangeDaysSpamSandwich
  • Reply 13 of 26
    carnegiecarnegie Posts: 943member
    macxpress said:
    seafox said:
    2 Million jobs! (Apple taking credit for 1.5M jobs they don't contribute to the payroll for)
    Those opportunities were created by Apple. Its like car manufacturers don't directly pay for jobs for those that work in parts factories, but the opportunity was created by them so essentially, the car manufacturer created that job. If the car manufacturer decided to move away that job would also go away as it wouldn't be necessary anymore. 

    So yes, Apple created those jobs. If Apple shut down the AppStore today, millions of jobs would be lost. 
    2M people are making a living developing apps for iOS? And these people wouldn't have jobs if not for the iOS App Store? Seriously?!?
    Yeah, you're right, that's definitely not what the report (which Apple gets its number from) means.

    Here's the report.

    The app economy jobs which it estimates (and that term should probably be emphasized in this case) fall into three categories (emphasis in original):

    • An IT-related job that uses App Economy skills—the ability to develop, maintain, or support mobile applications. We will call this a “core” app economy job. Core app economy jobs include app developers; software engineers whose work requires knowledge of mobile applications; security engineers who help keep mobile apps safe from being hacked; and help desk workers who support use of mobile apps. 
    • A non-IT job (such as sales, marketing, nance, human resources, or administrative staff) that supports core app economy jobs in the same enterprise. We will call this an “indirect” app economy job. 
    • A job in the local economy that is supported either by the goods and services purchased by the enterprise, or by the income flowing to core and indirect app economy workers. These “spillover” jobs include local professional services such as bank tellers, law of ces, and building managers; telecom, electric, and cable installers and maintainers; education, recreation, lodging, and restaurant jobs; and all the other necessary services. We use a conservative estimate of the indirect and spillover effects, as discussed in the Appendix.


    In previous versions of the report it offered a number for the first category - core app economy jobs. The last report I saw estimated those to be 550,000 of the 1.66 million total app economy jobs which it estimated. I don't see a breakout for that first category in this latest update. But given an updated total of 1.73 million we might guess that it would be around 600,000, maybe a little less.

    Further, the estimate of 1.53 million for iOS related jobs (which includes all three categories) doesn't mean that those jobs solely relate to (or are supported by) iOS. There's considerable overlap between iOS and Android in the estimates. Android related jobs are estimated to be 1.35 million. With a total of 1.73 million, obviously most of the jobs are estimated to be related to both Android and iOS .

    edited May 2017
  • Reply 14 of 26
    rogifan_newrogifan_new Posts: 4,297member
    macxpress said:
    seafox said:
    2 Million jobs! (Apple taking credit for 1.5M jobs they don't contribute to the payroll for)
    Those opportunities were created by Apple. Its like car manufacturers don't directly pay for jobs for those that work in parts factories, but the opportunity was created by them so essentially, the car manufacturer created that job. If the car manufacturer decided to move away that job would also go away as it wouldn't be necessary anymore. 

    So yes, Apple created those jobs. If Apple shut down the AppStore today, millions of jobs would be lost. 
    2M people are making a living developing apps for iOS? And these people wouldn't have jobs if not for the iOS App Store? Seriously?!?
    Wrong way to characterize this.  Nope body is claiming those folks wouldn't have jobs. It's mere.y a claim that Apple happens to be the proximate cause of those jobs.  That's credit worthy of claiming.  My company, which I started in 2000 with five other cofounders, just recently climbed to 100 employees.  Should I not have a sense of pride in the work I did to design the SaaS software upon which the company was founded?  I wouldn't claim that the talented employees wouldn't otherwise have work, but that fact doesn't take away from the fact that our collective innovation and efforts created 100 additional jobs for the economy.  
    Sounds like the politicians who claim tax cuts pay for themselves because of economic growth. But it's mostly fuzzy math and rosy projections. I'm not saying the internet and mobile technology/devices haven't created jobs. Of course they have. I just think it's a lot more difficult to put a number on it and attribute it to a specific company. I doubt Apple wants people to dig into the of some study that derives these numbers. They just want people seeing a headline somewhere that says Apple has created 2M jobs in the United States. It's good PR.
  • Reply 15 of 26
    cropr said:
    How easy is it to get a job if you know how to develop iOS apps?
    Very easy!
    How easy is it to have a profitable business developing iOS apps?  Sadly enough very hard as I has experienced.  An app costs on average 50K to develop.  With 30% cut Apple takes, this means 70K revenue to be break even.  90% of the apps on the app store don't reach that level.  I agree with 80K employees and the 450K suppliers jobs, but one has to take the 1.5M with a big bag of salt.
    I think there are many apps that are free, but are available in support of some profitable enterprise, like an app provided by your bank to securely access and manage accounts.  Those app developer jobs are justified by something other than any direct profit from selling an app.  And I'd imagine there are hundreds of thousands of such developers.  Including every iOS developer who works for Facebook, for example. 

    Exactly.  I would wager that there are three main categories of iOS apps.  In order of importance they are: 1. those apps you describe, 2. games, 3. everything else.  Think about the apps you use every day.  I expect that most of them are just the iOS front end to something that you do (or could) access via the Web or on your non-Apple devices.
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 16 of 26
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,156member
    macxpress said:
    gatorguy said:
    How easy is it to get a job if you know how to develop iOS apps?
    Very easy!
    How hard is it to make a living developing iOS apps? Apparently very hard. 

    (Same holds true for apps on other platforms so not dissing on Apple. It is what it is.)

    EDIT: This former Apple software engineer has a less-rosy take on the state of the little app developer.
    http://mattgemmell.com/damage/
    Sorry, but this just seems like someone who is butt-hurt from Apple. I disagree with his thinking. Apple has created opportunities for developers, even small ones that have never been possible before. Apple doesn't set the price, the developer does. Where else can you build and app and have the opportunity to have it on millions of devices? If you're a small developer you're always going to be the small fish in a big pond, no matter what platform you're developing for. If I'm a two person team developing an app for Windows I'm a minnow in an ocean of large fish. 

    If a developer doesn't like what they're getting into with an app on the App Store, then they can always leave. Nobody forces them to keep going. Yes, they may be out some money, but its an investment on any platform. Nothing is a guarantee. 
    I'm a software guy but I've also launched retail products which got stocked on shelves nationally. What guys like Gemmell leave out when complaining about Apple's 30%, is what it costs to distribute a product in retail. You have to work with distributors who say they'll do a lot but usually don't, but who get a cut about the same as Apple's. It's not much different. And you'd better believe distributors don't help you market your product, that's on you. 
    macxpress
  • Reply 17 of 26
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,156member

    macxpress said:
    seafox said:
    2 Million jobs! (Apple taking credit for 1.5M jobs they don't contribute to the payroll for)
    Those opportunities were created by Apple. Its like car manufacturers don't directly pay for jobs for those that work in parts factories, but the opportunity was created by them so essentially, the car manufacturer created that job. If the car manufacturer decided to move away that job would also go away as it wouldn't be necessary anymore. 

    So yes, Apple created those jobs. If Apple shut down the AppStore today, millions of jobs would be lost. 
    2M people are making a living developing apps for iOS? And these people wouldn't have jobs if not for the iOS App Store? Seriously?!?
    Wrong way to characterize this.  Nope body is claiming those folks wouldn't have jobs. It's mere.y a claim that Apple happens to be the proximate cause of those jobs.  That's credit worthy of claiming.  My company, which I started in 2000 with five other cofounders, just recently climbed to 100 employees.  Should I not have a sense of pride in the work I did to design the SaaS software upon which the company was founded?  I wouldn't claim that the talented employees wouldn't otherwise have work, but that fact doesn't take away from the fact that our collective innovation and efforts created 100 additional jobs for the economy.  
    Sounds like the politicians who claim tax cuts pay for themselves because of economic growth. But it's mostly fuzzy math and rosy projections. I'm not saying the internet and mobile technology/devices haven't created jobs. Of course they have. I just think it's a lot more difficult to put a number on it and attribute it to a specific company. I doubt Apple wants people to dig into the of some study that derives these numbers. They just want people seeing a headline somewhere that says Apple has created 2M jobs in the United States. It's good PR.
    Rogifan, the anti-fan. Must find a way to discredit positive Apple news and spin the narrative of nefarious mustache-twirlers deep within Apple...
    macxpress
  • Reply 18 of 26
    boltsfan17boltsfan17 Posts: 2,247member
    macxpress said:
    seafox said:
    2 Million jobs! (Apple taking credit for 1.5M jobs they don't contribute to the payroll for)
    Those opportunities were created by Apple. Its like car manufacturers don't directly pay for jobs for those that work in parts factories, but the opportunity was created by them so essentially, the car manufacturer created that job. If the car manufacturer decided to move away that job would also go away as it wouldn't be necessary anymore. 

    So yes, Apple created those jobs. If Apple shut down the AppStore today, millions of jobs would be lost. 
    2M people are making a living developing apps for iOS? And these people wouldn't have jobs if not for the iOS App Store? Seriously?!?
    Wrong way to characterize this.  Nope body is claiming those folks wouldn't have jobs. It's mere.y a claim that Apple happens to be the proximate cause of those jobs.  That's credit worthy of claiming.  My company, which I started in 2000 with five other cofounders, just recently climbed to 100 employees.  Should I not have a sense of pride in the work I did to design the SaaS software upon which the company was founded?  I wouldn't claim that the talented employees wouldn't otherwise have work, but that fact doesn't take away from the fact that our collective innovation and efforts created 100 additional jobs for the economy.  
    Sounds like the politicians who claim tax cuts pay for themselves because of economic growth. But it's mostly fuzzy math and rosy projections. I'm not saying the internet and mobile technology/devices haven't created jobs. Of course they have. I just think it's a lot more difficult to put a number on it and attribute it to a specific company. I doubt Apple wants people to dig into the of some study that derives these numbers. They just want people seeing a headline somewhere that says Apple has created 2M jobs in the United States. It's good PR.
    I agree. At the bottom of the page on Apple's website, the 1.5 million figure is based on research done by Dr. Michael Mandel. I looked up his work and the numbers are a bit flawed. While Apple does create a lot of jobs, the 1.5 million figure isn't entirely accurate. 
  • Reply 19 of 26
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 5,138member
    macxpress said:
    gatorguy said:
    How easy is it to get a job if you know how to develop iOS apps?
    Very easy!
    How hard is it to make a living developing iOS apps? Apparently very hard. 

    (Same holds true for apps on other platforms so not dissing on Apple. It is what it is.)

    EDIT: This former Apple software engineer has a less-rosy take on the state of the little app developer.
    http://mattgemmell.com/damage/
    Sorry, but this just seems like someone who is butt-hurt from Apple. I disagree with his thinking. Apple has created opportunities for developers, even small ones that have never been possible before. Apple doesn't set the price, the developer does. Where else can you build and app and have the opportunity to have it on millions of devices? If you're a small developer you're always going to be the small fish in a big pond, no matter what platform you're developing for. If I'm a two person team developing an app for Windows I'm a minnow in an ocean of large fish. 

    If a developer doesn't like what they're getting into with an app on the App Store, then they can always leave. Nobody forces them to keep going. Yes, they may be out some money, but its an investment on any platform. Nothing is a guarantee. 
    I'm a software guy but I've also launched retail products which got stocked on shelves nationally. What guys like Gemmell leave out when complaining about Apple's 30%, is what it costs to distribute a product in retail. You have to work with distributors who say they'll do a lot but usually don't, but who get a cut about the same as Apple's. It's not much different. And you'd better believe distributors don't help you market your product, that's on you. 
    Totally agree! I'm sorry some developers work their ass off and don't make a lot and others do. Its the way the world works. Not everyone can be equally successful. You make a very good point about the other part of the App Store that isn't mentioned. Its not free for Apple to run the store and those costs shouldn't be totally on Apple, especially when Apple does a lot if not most of the backend work for the developer so they don't have to worry about it. 
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 20 of 26
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 22,828member
    macxpress said:
    macxpress said:
    gatorguy said:
    How easy is it to get a job if you know how to develop iOS apps?
    Very easy!
    How hard is it to make a living developing iOS apps? Apparently very hard. 

    (Same holds true for apps on other platforms so not dissing on Apple. It is what it is.)

    EDIT: This former Apple software engineer has a less-rosy take on the state of the little app developer.
    http://mattgemmell.com/damage/
    Sorry, but this just seems like someone who is butt-hurt from Apple. I disagree with his thinking. Apple has created opportunities for developers, even small ones that have never been possible before. Apple doesn't set the price, the developer does. Where else can you build and app and have the opportunity to have it on millions of devices? If you're a small developer you're always going to be the small fish in a big pond, no matter what platform you're developing for. If I'm a two person team developing an app for Windows I'm a minnow in an ocean of large fish. 

    If a developer doesn't like what they're getting into with an app on the App Store, then they can always leave. Nobody forces them to keep going. Yes, they may be out some money, but its an investment on any platform. Nothing is a guarantee. 
    I'm a software guy but I've also launched retail products which got stocked on shelves nationally. What guys like Gemmell leave out when complaining about Apple's 30%, is what it costs to distribute a product in retail. You have to work with distributors who say they'll do a lot but usually don't, but who get a cut about the same as Apple's. It's not much different. And you'd better believe distributors don't help you market your product, that's on you. 
    Totally agree! I'm sorry some developers work their ass off and don't make a lot and others do. Its the way the world works. Not everyone can be equally successful. You make a very good point about the other part of the App Store that isn't mentioned. Its not free for Apple to run the store and those costs shouldn't be totally on Apple, especially when Apple does a lot if not most of the backend work for the developer so they don't have to worry about it. 
    Honest question: What do you suppose it costs Apple to host one more app in the App Store? Personally I'd guess a few cents, but maybe a dollar or two at the most. Not a major game, but something run-of-the-mill.  Is there a source somewhere that purports to show how much it costs Apple to run the entire thing? 
    edited May 2017 rogifan_new
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